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Toy Story Is Unforgivingly Dark When You Try And Explain The Mythology

Everyone loves Toy Story, but some of the mythology seems super dark when you start to think about it. Many people have now grown up with the franchise and are still enjoying the franchise well into adulthood, but a little thought about the mythology and things can get quite twisted.

Many Toy Story fan theories have surfaced over the years, such as Wheezy being the true villain, Toy Story 3 being an allegory of the Holocaust, and Sid becoming a garbage man in order to save toys.Those are only the beginning, too. Other theories discussed in depth on Reddit include whether Andy's mom was Jessie's original owner, and Toy Story 3 being about the Illuminati.

Related: Pixar Can (And Should) Be Better Under Pete Docter

Some theories are too wacky to ever make sense, but some really get you thinking, including this recent tweet from @stiggib3 on Twitter, whose daughter turned the concept of toys coming to life on its head:

Initial reading might provoke a reaction of "gross," but let's think about this for a moment. Theoretically, the girl has a point. Andy doesn't know that his toys come alive when he leaves the room, so logic dictates that if he doesn't know they're alive, he won't know when they die. So, taken at that level, yes, Andy could carry on unwittingly playing with a corpse. Except looking back at the story so far, we can see just how smart and adaptable these toys are. In Toy Story, they manage to get Woody over to Sid's house, and Buzz and Woody together manage to drive RC back to Andy's car. In Toy Story 2, the toys leave the house and navigate a busy street to get to Al's Toy Barn, and in Toy Story 3 they not only break out of Sunnyside Day Nursery, but they also escape a furnace. If a toy died, would the other toys not group together to ensure that the deceased toy was taken care of, either burying it or at the very least hiding it out of sight so Andy didn't continue to play with it?

As it happens, another theory might debunk the corpse theory altogether. Many fans believe that the toys are actually immortal, therefore Andy would not ever be potentially playing with a corpse because the only way a toy can be gone forever, is if it's completely destroyed. The theory is backed up by the ages of some of the toys, in particular, Woody, Jessie, and Bullseye, who were 1950s toys. This theory would mean the toys watch their owners grow up, then get passed onto a new owner, like Andy handing his toys to Bonnie in Toy Story 3. The only dangers presented in any of the 3 movies are being lost, forgotten, or completely destroyed. Even being taken apart and reconstructed into a monstrosity by Sid didn't actually kill any toys, and we see Woody broken and fixed in Toy Story 2 like he was as good as new.

While this isn't necessarily the best thing for the toys (living the same life over and over again), it saves us the thought of our favorite toys dying, so it's the theory we're going with for now.

Next: 16 Things You Never Knew About Toy Story

Source: @stiggib3

Key Release Dates
  • Toy Story 4 (2019) release date: Jun 21, 2019
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