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The Last Jedi's Novelization Teased Solo's Falcon Twist - And We Figured It Out

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Spoilers for Solo: A Star Wars Story.

The novelization for Star Wars: The Last Jedi actually teased a major plot twist in Solo: A Star Wars Story: that L3-37 becomes the Millennium Falcon. Jason Fry's novelization was teased as an "expanded edition;" one of Del Rey's Associate Editors teased that it included "expanded scenes, alternate scenes, and even brand new stuff you ain't ever seen before." That "brand new stuff" actually included an amusing teaser for Solo.

Solo: A Star Wars Story introduces viewers to Lando's cantankerous droid, L3-37. Something of a droid libertarian, L3 was viewed by Lando as one of the best navigators he knows. The destruction of L3's body on Kessel left Han's team without a navigator, and they desperately needed one in order to navigate the Maw. They're left little choice but to install L3's brain into the Millennium Falcon itself.

Related: Solo: A Star Wars Story Reshoots: What's Lord & Miller And What's Ron Howard?

There's a sense in which this was quite a sad end for L3-37, who had just believed she'd discovered her destiny after liberating Kessel. Within moments of achieving this, she's shot down and then loses her body, becoming one of three ship's computers in the Falcon. Shocking it may be, but it was nevertheless signposted quite a while ago.

Foreshadowing L3-37's Plot Twist

The Last Jedi novelization called out Han's childhood on Corellia, but that wasn't the only clue to Solo: A Star Wars Story in the book, with a key passage discussing the Falcon's droid brain:

"The Falcon responded sulkily, then launched into a diatribe about its inadequate sensor rectennae, power feeds to the dish that remained misaligned more than three decades after the incident that had knocked them out of place, and Chewbacca's obviously deliberate refusal to prioritize repairs the way the freighter thought made sense.

When the Falcon mentioned something about barely being able to detect the back end of a bantha at high noon, E2-D2 suppressed an electronic sigh. The Falcon has always been cantankerous, its three droid brains quarreling endlessly unless forced to work together. Still, R2-D2 usually for along with the ship well enough. For one thing, none of the brains could stand C-3PO; for another, one of them had a fondness for both romantic gossip and dirty jokes, both of which R2-D2 has learned to provide in large quantities."

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This, along with careful analysis of what pre-release interviews, came together to create the theory that one of the Falcon's three droid brains was actually L3-37.

Read More: Breaking Down Solo: A Star Wars Story's Villain Plots

Lucasfilm established the real nature of the Millennium Falcon's computer shortly before the theatrical release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, in the DK reference book Star Wars: Absolutely Everything You Need To Know; it stated that it consists of three droid brains, cannibalized from an R3-series Astromech, a V5-transport droid, and a Slicer droid. While L3 is a self-modified droid, presumably at her core she's the Slicer droid. It's certainly believable that Lando originally picked her up as a Slicer, and that L3's desire for self-improvement ultimately led her to become a navigator. Approached about this on Twitter, novelization author Jason Fry expressed amusement in a simple tweet, implying this was very much intentional.

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But this raises another curious question; where do the other two droid brains come from? Had one or both of them already been installed by the time of Solo: A Star Wars Story, were they also part of L3, or would they be added throughout Han's smuggling career? Given the amount of setup for future spinoffs in Solo, it wouldn't be surprising for Lucasfilm to come back to this well.

Next: Solo's Sabacc Game Just Changed Star Wars History

Key Release Dates
  • Star Wars 9 / Star Wars: Episode IX (2019) release date: Dec 20, 2019
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