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Netflix Orders Adult Animated Series Described As Gay James Bond

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Netflix has ordered an adult animated series called Q-Force, which is described as gay James Bond. The original James Bond series, which officially kicked off with Ian Fleming’s 1953 novel Casino Royale, was a fourteen-novel series that later expanded to something of a cinematic empire, with twenty-four films to its name and a twenty-fifth on the way.

Throughout the years since Sean Connery first portrayed the super-spy known as 007 in 1962’s Dr. No, the James Bond franchise has gone through substantial highs and lows. Perhaps one of the biggest ongoing debates has been the appointment of a black James Bond - in this case, the possibility of Idris Elba taking over from current Bond, Daniel Craig. Regardless of how much momentum or support this talking point gets, however, the concept of altering Bond’s sexual orientation or gender has never been considered a plausible change for a new Bond who’s entering into a new era. As a matter of fact, the idea of an LGTBQ action hero in any capacity has received scant support, especially during this time of original streaming content and providers. Until now, that is...

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Related: Pierce Brosnan Talks Gay James Bond: 'Why Not'?

According to TV Line, Netflix has just commit to ten episodes of Q-Force, an adult-themed animated comedy about a team of LGTBQ superspies who are led by a handsome, James Bond-esque secret agent. The new series is the brainchild of Will & Grace star Sean Hayes and Brooklyn Nine-Nine producer Mike Schur. At present time, there are rumors floating around that Hayes will also voice Q-Force’s lead character, though Netflix has yet to confirm this.

Megan Mullally and Sean Hayes in Will and Grace

As a team of superspies, Q-Force are regularly underestimated by their colleagues and are constantly working to prove themselves, despite having an excellent history of getting the job done. In addition to the regular obstacles the team faces, they also deal with their own personal challenges as a part of the LGTBQ community. Although it currently doesn’t sound as if there’s a lot of room here for comedy, the series will likely be striving for that comfortable middle-ground between delivering an honest portrayal of real life LGTBQ issues and the laughs that can be found by turning a traditionally hetero-dominant genre on its head. It’s no small task, but one that Netflix and the team behind Q-Force are willing to take on.

One of the best things about the growing number of streaming platforms like Netflix is that they allow new voices, subjects and concepts to be more readily taken on. As the LGTBQ community and other minorities fight for more representation both on and off TV, it is programs such as this that will offer audiences of all sexual orientations the opportunity to see something new. Q-Force may or may not hit the right mark with viewers, but as things stand, it already wins full points for its originality and willingness to challenge a still-changing status quo.

More: 10 Best LGBTQ TV Shows

Source: TV Line

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