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Grimm: 5 Fairy Tales It Adapted Very Well (And 5 That Could Have Been Better)

Grimm was a supernatural procedural show with mystery cases based on fairy tales and legends. We look at the series' best and worst adaptations.

In 2011, NBC would air the series premiere of Grimm, a show that had been mismarketed as being purely horror prior to its release. Tackling gruesome topics with a lighthearted and comedic approach, the fact that Grimm valued humor above all else surprised critics and fans alike, and the show took a while to find its footing.

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Grimm spanned six seasons, concluding its time on the air in 2017. This series was definitely at its best when it kept things on the comic side, but as the seasons went on, the fantasy series strived to become something bigger. As has been a hard lesson for many TV series, Grimm would prove that bigger is not always better, and some questionable decisions led to the show's cancellation.

Perhaps the most memorable aspect of Grimm was its unique take on classic Brothers Grimm fairy tales. The show always presented an unforgettable twist on well-known stories, and its iconic monsters — better known as Wesen in the series — were definitely impressive.

Let's take a look at 5 fairy tales this series adapted very well and 5 that probably could have been better.

10 WELL DONE — EL CUCUY

As Grimm began to mature into a well-respected show, it started fleshing out the legends from which it would derive storylines. The series strayed away from classic fairy tales and began to put its spin on lesser-known stories such as La Llorona, Krampus, and the El Cucuy.

An El Cucuy is a monster that originates from an ancient Spanish legend. The bears many similarities to that of the bogeyman, and Grimm's take on it was equal parts eerie and thrilling.

9 COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER — LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD

The series premiere of Grimm didn't directly follow the age-old tale of Little Red Riding Hood, but the episode became infamous for shedding gruesome light on the story. Grimm's pilot presents multiple homicide victims who all happen to be women who were wearing a red item of clothing.

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Ultimately, it's revealed that a Wesen is murdering these women, and while this episode suffers from the same problems that most early-season episodes of Grimm did, the pilot does serve to introduce some of the most prominent relationships on the show.

8 WELL DONE — BRIAR ROSE

Nick and Juliette served as Grimm's main romantic relationship for the better part of the series. They were a beloved couple, and actors Bitsie Tulloch and David Giuntoli were actually dating behind the scenes, which added to the onscreen chemistry between their characters.

In the Season 1 finale titled "Woman In Black," Juliette is cursed by Adalind, falling into a coma as a result. This leads to Grimm's version of Briar Rose (or Sleeping Beauty) in Season 2 when Nick attempts to wake Juliette with a kiss.

7  COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER — THE SANDMAN

"Mr. Sandman" was the fifteenth episode of Grimm's second season. As the title would suggest, the Wesen that Nick and his friends battle in this episode was a Sandman-like creature. The opening quote for this episode — "'now we've got eyes, eyes, a beautiful pair of children's eyes,' he whispered" — would suggest that this might be a promising adaptation of a classic fairy tale, but Grimm would ultimately fall short in this one.

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"Mr. Sandman" gets a little too weird very quickly, and strays significantly from the original Sandman lore. The Wesen that is supposed to resemble the Sandman is called Jinnamuru Xunte and bears similarities to a fly, which is more gross than eerie.

6 WELL DONE — RAPUNZEL

The seventh episode of Grimm's first season was titled "Let Your Hair Down" and was the series' adaptation of Rapunzel. This ended up being an interesting, ultimately well-done episode, despite taking place in the first season, when Grimm was still finding its footing.

"Let Your Hair Down" follows Nick as he investigates a long-abandoned missing persons case when he and Hank find the victim — a troubled young girl — in the woods.

5  COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER — KRAMPUS

Before the legend of Krampus was really acknowledged in mainstream media, Grimm took a swing at adapting the twisted anti-Santa in the Season 3 episode "Twelve Days Of Krampus." Nick and Hank investigate the murders of some teenagers and discover that the killer is a Wesen that has taken to wearing a Santa suit.

This was a good attempt at adapting Krampus, but if Grimm had delved deeper into the lore, it would have been a lot better.

4  WELL DONE — LA LLORONA

It's impressive that Grimm was one of the first TV series to breathe life into these foreign legends that were rather obscure at the time. The episode "La Llorona" aired in 2012, far before this legend was given attention by outlets as popular as the Conjuring franchise.

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In this episode, Nick investigates a series of child abductions and discovers that it's the work of La Llorona. Additionally, Juliette is put in the spotlight in this episode, as she is able to translate the Hispanic legend.

3 COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER —  THE CHUPACABRA

"Chupacabra" was the eighth episode in Grimm's fourth season, and was the series' attempt to bring to life an infamous, dark legend. However, Grimm's version of the bloodsucking Chupacabra ended up being a swing and a miss. Due to the nature of this legend, it's a notoriously hard one to adapt onscreen, but the attempt was there.

2  WELL DONE — THE PIED PIPER

The legend of the Pied Piper is one of the more disturbing ones, and Grimm doesn't hold back in its adaptation. The Season 1 episode "Danse Macabre" revolved around a Wesen that resembled the Pied Piper. Nick and Hank became involved after some incidents at the local high school.

Grimm unravels a tangled web of a storyline in this episode and executes it in an impressive way.

1  COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER — THE THREE LITTLE PIGS

"The Three Bad Wolves" was the sixth episode of Grimm's first season and opened with the following quote derived from the Brothers Grimm's The Three Little Pigs: "'Little pig, little pig, let me come in,' said the wolf to the pig. 'Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin,' said the pig to the wolf."

As the beginning of this episode would suggest, Grimm's stab at The Three Little Pigs was a little questionable and completely riddled with the rather corny writing that was so prevalent in the series' early seasons.

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