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10 Most Memorable Quotes From Fight Club

Fight Club was the movie that defined a generation of young men. It might not be a pretty one, but its tale of repressed rage, corporate monotony, homoerotic overtones, insomnia, nihilism, anarchism versus consumerism, and splicing porno frames into family-friendly movies struck a chord with audiences across the world. David Fincher’s oddball, yet relatively faithful adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk’s darkly comic novel might not have been a huge box office success when it was first released, but it has certainly gained a massive cult following in the years since. So, here are the 10 Most Memorable Quotes From Fight Club.

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10 “First, you’ve gotta know – not fear, know – that someday, you’re gonna die.”

According to Tyler Durden, this is the key to living life to the full. If you’re afraid of death, then you won’t really experience life. You won’t do anything risky or dangerous or life-threatening or exhilarating if your main priority is not dying. When Tyler gets the Narrator to know, and not fear, that he is going to die one day, he starts setting up his ring of anarchism and rallying an army against the advertising industry. This isn’t necessarily the way to fully experience life, but it’s a start: “First, you’ve gotta know – not fear, know – that someday, you’re gonna die.”

9 “When you have insomnia, you’re never really asleep...and you’re never really awake.”

As with most of his film’s subjects, David Fincher does a fantastic job of depicting and framing insomnia in Fight Club. It’s partly down to Edward Norton’s impeccable performance, but a lot of it is in the camera angles chosen by Fincher’s regular cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth and editing and color-grading choices made by his editor James Haygood. It’s simply a strong command of the magic of the movies. And the horrors of experiencing insomnia are summed up beautifully in one single line of voiceover narration: “When you have insomnia, you’re never really asleep...and you’re never really awake.” That’s pretty much it in a nutshell. It’s a nightmare.

8 “I am Jack’s complete lack of surprise.”

The fact that Edward Norton’s Narrator character continually uses the phrase “I am Jack’s...” has led some people to think that Jack is the character’s name. In fact, screenwriter Jim Uhls called him “Jack” in the script. But it’s like Benicio del Toro’s character “DJ” from The Last Jedi. The character doesn’t actually have a name, but they need a placeholder name for scripts and call sheets, otherwise production would get very confusing. The phrase simply refers to the average man. He got it from a magazine. It’s just that the Narrator takes it one step further with dark twists on it, like “I am Jack’s wasted life,” and “I am Jack’s smirking revenge.”

7 “A condom is the glass slipper of our generation.”

A lot of love from Fight Club fans is directed at Tyler Durden and the Narrator, but Marla Singer is a great character, too. Helena Bonham Carter plays her every whim perfectly, like when she calls and says she’s finished off a bottle of sleeping pills and adds, “This isn’t a real suicide thing. This is probably one of those cry-for-help things.” She’s always so blasé.

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And her explanation of why Cinderella stories are dead is one for the ages: “A condom is the glass slipper of our generation. You slip one on when you meet a stranger. You dance all night, and then you throw it away. The condom, I mean, not the stranger.”

6 “You are not special. You are not a beautiful or unique snowflake. You are the same decaying organic matter as everything else.”

There’s nothing particularly cool or noble about humanity. We’re actually the worst thing in the world, since we evolved into this beautiful, natural world and we’re destroying it, piece by piece. Tyler Durden knows this and he uses it to give his foot soldiers, the Space Monkeys, some real discipline. He lines them up and tells them, “Listen up, maggots! You are not special. You are not a beautiful or unique snowflake. You are the same decaying organic matter as everything else. We are the all-singing, all-dancing crap of the world.” It’s something every human being needs to be told.

5 “In Tyler we trusted.”

There’s a sort of sly, double-edged message to the Narrator’s claim when he says, “Tyler built himself an army. Why was Tyler Durden building an army? To what purpose? For what greater good? In Tyler we trusted.” Tyler’s whole ethos is to go against what the corporations are telling us and go against what the government is telling us, but in doing so, he tells a bunch of people what they should be thinking and they continue to be mindless drones following what someone is telling them – they just swapped ads for Tyler Durden. The Narrator blindly follows Tyler – and trusts in him – without knowing his plan. Later in the movie, he realizes that Tyler is him, and he doesn’t know the purpose of his own army.

4 “The first rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club.”

The rule’s so nice, they named it twice. Many people have tried to analyze exactly why Tyler Durden felt the need to make the first two rules of Fight Club the same. Simply put, it’s because he wanted to really implant the idea in these guys’ heads that Fight Club is a very secretive organization. Don’t talk about it. Seriously, don’t talk about it. If he says it twice, it has more impact: “The first rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club.”

3 “You met me at a very strange time in my life.”

This line should be included in every movie with a romantic subplot. Movies usually focus on the most interesting part of their lead character’s life, whether that is the time they became a superhero or the time they were pursued by a serial killer or the time they developed a split personality and rallied an army of Gen-Xers against the system.

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Usually, during this time, due to the three-act structure and time constraints and audience quadrants, the character will also fall in love, and all the other stuff that goes on gets in the way of it. The Narrator explains this to Marla in one sentence: “You met me at a very strange time in my life.”

2 “The things you own end up owning you.”

Many viewers think that the message of Fight Club is anti-consumerist. They think it’s a movie that critiques all the systems that are in place, like banks and corporations and products. But Tyler Durden is clearly posed as the villain. Everything he does is framed as the wrong thing to do, and at the end of the movie, as all the banks’ headquarters burn to the ground, there’s not a sense of hope, but rather a sense of dread. Still, early on in the movie, Tyler makes a very strong point about IKEA culture: “The things you own end up owning you.”

1 “Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy s**t we don’t need.”

This Tyler Durden monologue is simply iconic: “Man, I see in Fight Club the strongest and smartest men who’ve ever lived. I see all this potential, and I see it squandered. G**damn it, an entire generation pumping gas, waiting tables; slaves with white collars. Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy s**t we don’t need. We’re the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our great war is a spiritual war. Our great depression is our lives. We’ve all been raised on television to believe that one day we’d all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars, but we won’t. And we’re slowly learning that fact. And we’re very, very p****d off.”

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