Only a few days are left until the World War Z movie adaptation open in theaters. The globe-trotting zombie action-thriller – with Brad Pitt headlining – has endured a rough journey to the big screen, due to reasons like Paramount having to cover the expenses for additional photography (in order to improve the original ending).

Pitt stars as Gerry Lane, a U.N. employee who’s enjoying some quality time with his wife (Mireille Enos) and daughters, when suddenly – and without any warning – a Zombie pandemic breaks out across the globe and threatens to destroy humanity in a matter of months. Gerry must race against the clock, in an effort to track the disease to its source and wipe it out before it’s too late – even though he risks never getting to see his family (alive) again, by doing so.

Watch an extended clip where Pitt and his family evade zombies, below:

The World War Z source material, authored by Max Brooks, is a big ol’ allegory that examines geopolitical realities and how the global social breakdown contributes to the chaos and destruction brought on by the zombpocalypse. Basically, a loyal film adaptation would’ve felt like Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion – albeit with zombies – crossed with a flashback-heavy narrative, along the lines of Interview with the Vampire or the first act of District 9.

That’s not the route taken in the World War Z script written by Matthew Michael Carnahan (The Kingdom), which instead puts the emphasis on Pitt’s efforts to save the world and protect his family. Yes, it’s a major change to the source material – and the safer option for a big-budget action film – but is the movie a success or failure, on its own terms?

So far, World War Z has earned a respectable critical reception, yet many of the reviews (positive and negative) seem to agree: director Marc Forster’s movie adaptation is really just a standard popcorn flick, as opposed to being either a blockbuster with clear socio-political undercurrents or a game-changing addition to the zombie genre.

That the film’s PG-13 Rating make the violence feel a bit toothless, is a complaint that’s also been raised a number of times already. Essentially, it sounds as though your impression of the World War Z trailer will be similar to your feelings about the movie as a whole (for better or for worse).

World War Z opens in 2D and select 3D/IMAX theaters on June 21st, 2013.

Source: Paramount Pictures