If CW’s decision to end development of their Wonder Woman series, Amazon, is any indication of the quality of the script, then network president Mark Pedowitz just prevented us all from wasting a lot of time – and them money.

Diana Themyscira has been laid off by Warner Bros. Television. Still, there’s a chance she might return for another go.

While speaking to the Hollywood Reporter at the Television Critics Association on Wednesday, CW’s head broke the news that the most recent take on the Amazonian from Young Avengers creator Allan Heinberg and Heroes producer Aron Eli Coleite will not be filming a pilot.

“We did not go forward with it.”

So Amazon is dead. With development having started at a time when DC was still figuring out its own version of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, as well as CW’s Arrow still coming into its own – which subsequently helped create a platform for the network to (potentially) launch Flash with Grant Gustin (Glee) – is anyone really surprised? After all, we already have a Princess Diana with Gal Gadot, who is set to appear with a Ben Affleck Batman in the Man of Steel sequel Batman vs. Superman.

However, Pedowitz still gives hope that Diana could appear on the small screen:

“It all depends on the script. We were very careful with ‘Arrow,’ and we’re being very careful with ‘Flash.’ These are iconic characters, so we’re going to be very careful with ‘Wonder Woman.’ You only get one shot before you get bit.”

As careful as they may be, it’s highly unlikely that anything live-action Wonder Woman – no matter what it’s named – will make it to the small screen before Batman vs. Superman in 2015, or Justice League whenever that comes out.  The overwhelming “warm” reception many fans gave Gal Gadot upon hearing she had been cast as the theatrical form likely didn’t help things, either.

As confident as Warner Bros., Zack Snyder and David S. Goyer may be with their pick, they’re not going to risk potentially impacting a billion-dollar DC universe for any television attempt. It could also be possible that, even if Heinberg and Coleite’s script was actually good, maybe a few phone calls from the top helped make the decision to “not go forward with it.” Again, because of the potential impact.

With the fall television season generally at a 65% cancellation rate for new shows, a live-action attempt at Wonder Woman on network TV doesn’t exactly instill confidence – especially since NBC’s attempt didn’t go quite as planned, and especially since she would be all alone, with no tether to Arrow’s established audience.

Statistics, reasoning and explanations aside: Is anyone really surprised?

Keep an eye on Screen Rant for any news regarding a potential Wonder Woman series – or movie (which will more than likely happen first).

Source: Hollywood Reporter