The fast-paced world of digital video rentals has all but been dominated by Netflix at this point. Sure, there are other ways to rent movies and television shows online – iTunes, Hulu, Amazon, even the near extinct Blockbuster – but you rarely (if ever) hear someone say, “Guess what just hit Amazon Instant Video!”

That said, there are those people who exist that wouldn’t leave Facebook if they didn’t have to. If it were possible, they’d have Facebook everything, from email to music to videogames to movies. Fortunately for those people, Warner Bros. is expanding its Facebook movie rental library with five additional films.

That library, which previously only included The Dark Knight, will now include such studio hits as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Life As We Know It, Inception and Yogi Bear.

To rent a film, just click on the above links to visit each corresponding film fan page and click the “Watch Now” button to apply your Facebook credits. You’ll have full control over each film for up to 48 hours after your purchase. If something comes up and you decide to pause the movie, you can resume watching it once you’ve logged back into Facebook.

How does one receive “Facebook credits”? Much like Nintendo Points on the Wii and Microsoft Points on Xbox Live, Facebook has its own make-believe currency to disguise the amount of money you’re syphoning out of your bank account (or credit card) to purchase said “credits.” ($1=10 credits.) All you have to do is go to the above movie pages, click “Watch Now,” insert your Zip Code, click “Pay with Facebook,” fill out your Pay Pal/debit card/credit card information, and you’re good to go. Alternatively, you can buy more credits here.

Each of the newer rentals (Inception, Life As We Know It, Yogi Bear) will cost 40 credits – that’s $4 – and the older rentals (the Harry Potters and The Dark Knight) will cost 30 credits – or $3.

Frankly, it’s a pretty terrible deal when you realize that Netflix offers many, many, many more unlimited instant streaming movies (and they aren’t mostly awful, either) for just $7.99 a month. Still, the idea that Facebook could potentially jump into the movie renting business is an intriguing one. Considering more than half of Americans are on Facebook now, the company could be a serious contender for the future king of streaming high quality full-length TV shows, movies, and other multimedia – that is, if Zuckerberg and company are actively pursuing such a thing.

No doubt, Warner Bros. will continue to add movies to its Facebook film collection in the coming weeks and months, so stay tuned.