‘Delivery Man’ Interview: Vince Vaughn on Keeping it Real

Published 11 months ago by

518016751 3 857 572 Delivery Man Interview: Vince Vaughn on Keeping it Real

Vince Vaughn’s last few situation comedies (The Internship, The Watch) weren’t big box office draws, but his next feature Delivery Man -  more of a drama driven storyline with comedic undertones – aims to change this. Written and directed by Ken Scott, Delivery Man is based on the French-Canadian film Starbuck which was released in 2011.

Delivery Man feels like a return to Vaughn’s 2006 hit, The Break-Up, which successfully blended comedy with heartfelt emotional scenes thanks to strong performances and believable relationships. Delivery Man does the same with Vaughn doing what he does best, playing the quintessential everyman.

 

Vaughn plays David Wozniak, a man who finds himself in the unusual life-changing situation of being the genetic father of 533 children thanks to a clerical error at a fertility clinic. Caught between a rock and hard place in life, Wozniak finds himself in a legal battle to keep his identity secret but uses the opportunity to find a new purpose. Screen Rant chatted with Vaughn about the his role in the story where he tells us how he related to the desperation his character goes through.

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So let’s talk about sperm! Tell us about Dave, what kind of character is he?

Vince Vaughn: I think Dave is a guy who is a very genuine guy who has a big capacity to care about people and who loves life, likes to laugh. He likes to have fun. I think he’s a guy who a lot of us in life… people will tell you ‘you need to be better at this’ or ‘you need to be good at this’, ‘you should be more this way’…. Maybe when you’re younger you sign up for that where you’re trying to be things to all people and at some point hopefully, you start to be a little easier on yourself and just start to accept who you are.

David is in a desperate place in his life, have you ever felt that kind of desperation, perhaps early on in your career?

I think we’ve all felt that way. You can feel very alone or very hurt. Or very isolated or the weight of decisions that you’ve made hasn’t gone well. That’s how we grow up. That’s how you learn. You have to go through those experiences and I think that’s one of the nice things in the film is from a young person’s point of view, you feel so isolated. One is in a job they really don’t want to be in. And the girl’s in a relationship where she’s not being respected and not in a good environment. You can feel very alone in that when you’re younger and there’s something in that connection when you realize you’re not the only one experiencing these things and it’s nice to have people to talk to and to share those things with and be vulnerable with. And I think as a parent, it kinda deals with the hopes you have for your kids and the fears and wanting to help them avoid lessons that ultimately they have to go through.

This film is based on the French Canadian film, Starbuck, how did the script land in your hands?

Steven Spielberg and Stacey Snider from Dreamworks came to me. They always have very good taste in films. I had seen the film and thought it was charming. I was not interested in just taking the concept and doing something with it but the writer/director is the same writer/director and I talked to him. He’s a very passionate filmmaker. He’s very passionate about the story. He said: “You know I made this for this audience. I’m passionate about that, but I’m very passionate about telling this story for this audience.” And I think when you see the movie, you can tell what a truthful place he works from and what a focused place he works from. So you’re always lucky as an actor if you can find a director who’s that talented. I’m working with him again actually now, with Tom Wilkinson and Dave Franco on a script from Steve Conrad who wrote The Pursuit of Happyness. (The film is called ‘Business Trip’).

So, what’s happening with Dodgeball? Is there going to be a sequel?

I don’t know, I’ve heard some talk about it but we will see.

Would you like there to be one?

Could be, yeah, that was a fun movie.

And you’ve got Anchorman 2 coming out later in the year, what can we expect from this movie?

It’s going to be fun. I haven’t seen it yet. Wes Mantooth, the character I play might pop up in it. For sure.

Do you feel any pressure to please your fans? That movie was such a cult hit.

Oh those guys do a good job. I’m just showing up and having some fun with them for a little bit of time.

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Next up, we can see Vaughn in the long overdue sequel Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues. As for Dodgeball 2, we’ll have to wait and see..

A DreamWorks Pictures and Reliance Entertainment presentation, the film is written for the screen and directed by Ken Scott, based on “Starbuck,” the original screenplay written by Ken Scott and Martin Petit, and also stars Chris Pratt and Cobie Smulders. “Delivery Man” is produced by André Rouleau and executive produced by Ray Angelic, Scott Mednick and Mark Sourian.

Delivery Man hits theaters on November 22, 2013

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  1. I heard from the director that it’s a “shot for shot” remake of his original Starbuck film.

    • Shot for shot.. but replacing the talented Patrick Huard with the hack Vince Vaughn.

      It’s really a shame that it is such a hard sell for sub-titled films in The States.

  2. Is that a joke about Vince’s Psycho movie?

  3. Vince Vaughn… the living, breathing interpretation of the Krusty the Clown joke in the ‘Radioactive Man’ episode…

    “But look at my range…”

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