10 Movie Details You Definitely Missed

Intro

When a movie has audiences on the edge of their seats, or falling out of them, you’d be surprised at how much they miss. We don’t just mean mistakes or plot holes, since viewers are just as likely to overlook clever details the directors placed into the film on purpose for an extra laugh – or a mind-bending twist. Here are Screen Rant’s 10 Movie Details You Definitely Missed.

Kill Bill Vol. 1

Quentin Tarantino managed to keep the real identity of Uma Thurman’s character a secret through both Kill Bill Volume 1 and 2, referred to by Bill only as “Kiddo,” and officially credited as “The Bride.” It was only at the end of Volume 2 that the heroine’s name was revealed in full as ‘Beatrix Kiddo.’ But eagle-eyed viewers could have spoiled the surprise well ahead of time, since Kiddo’s plane ticket to Japan in the first movie shows her name in full.

Inception

Even die-hard fans of this ‘dreams within dreams’ heist movie may have missed one of Inception’s most brilliant touches. Throughout the story, the team uses a single song as a signal to wake up, with the music growing louder and deeper as it travels down through layers of dreams. Viewers may not notice that the entire movie’s score is built from the same song, slowed down to match the way it sounds while dreaming – in other words: telling audiences it’s time for them to wake up as well.

Inception

The movie’s ending has also been debated, with fans wondering if the spinning top is meant to show that the movie’s hero, Cobb, is only dreaming his happy ending. But a small detail may hold the answer: whenever Cobb is inside of a dream – where his late wife is around to wreak havoc – his wedding ring returns to his finger. When awake, it disappears. Going only by that detail, the lack of the ring in the final scene confirms it’s not an illusion.

Total Recall

Long before Inception had movie fans debating what was real and what wasn’t, this sci-fi adventure was playing the same trick. When a blue collar worker of the future pays to have thrilling memories of a top secret mission to Mars planted in his brain, his real memories return… sending him on an adventure to Mars. Fans have debated whether the film is real or all in the hero’s head – but listen closely to one Rekall lab tech who directly references the film’s final scene (insert: “blue sky on Mars” clip). Other hints can be explained away, but this easy to miss line is hard to argue.

Fast Five

Introduced as a new character in Fast & Furious: Tokyo Drift, the unshakable Han (pronounced “Honn”) – played by actor Sung Kang – would go on to become a main player in future films, referred to only by his first name. Director Justin Lin’s unofficial prequel Better Luck Tomorrow starred Kang as ‘Han Lue,’ but Fast Five revealed his full name was revealed to be ‘Han Seoul-Oh,’ a clear nod to the Star Wars saga’s infamous smuggler.

Godzilla

As serious a threat as a prehistoric alpha predator may pose, the minds behind the 2014 Godzilla reboot had plenty of fun with their opening credits. The classified reports censored to conceal everything but a cast or crew member’s name is clever, but a closer look reveals nearly every one of them to be the butt of a joke – including a nod to Bryan Cranston’s role as Breaking Bad’s ‘Walter White,’ and the monster movie that put Gareth Edwards in the director’s chair.

The Lord of the Rings

No fantasy fan will forget the moment when Boromir met his end in the Fellowship of the Ring, pierced by multiple arrows from an Uruk-Hai (pronounced “Oorook High”) bow, but it’s Aragorn who finds the best way to remember his sacrifice. Removing Boromir’s leather vambraces before sending his body on to Gondor, Aragorn goes on to sport the forearm guards for the next two films – a fact never called out or noted by any character.

Back to the Future

When Marty McFly’s time travel prevents his parents from falling in love, he’s forced to bring them together – or risk fading from existence as a result. Convincing his sheepish father means using all the futuristic tech and jargon he can muster – including music by Van Halen. Although the band wouldn’t give permission to use their name or music, lead guitarist Eddie Van Halen did. Marty’s cassette tape is labelled EDWARD Van Halen as a result, with the guitarist admitting years later that he recorded the guitar riffs himself.