After years of development, Warner Bros. has recruited yet another writer to try and get the Twilight Zone film reboot – which would not be an anthology movie like the 1983 version – off the ground. At one time, Astronaut’s Wife writer Rand Ravich was tabbed for the job, but he quickly gave way to Jason Rothenberg. After Rothenberg took his crack, the studio pursued King Arthur writer Joby Harold to do a rewrite. In 2013, one-time Heroes showrunner Aron Eli Coleite was brought in to work on the script after Oblivion director Joseph Kosinski and writer Anthony Peckham became involved.

It’s been several years now since anything was heard about Twilight Zone and its troublesome script. Now, however, there is a fresh update and it could spark renewed hope that Warner Bros. will actually get their reboot of Rod Serling’s classic series to the screen at some point in the not-too-distant future (otherwise fans will have to board a Serling-esque time machine if they want to see it).

According to Variety, Warner Bros. has found yet another new writer to take a crack at putting together a non-anthology Twilight Zone movie script, tapping Christine Lavaf to handle the task. Lavaf has only a single short film and an episode of Fringe to her official credit, but she did sell three spec pilots in 2016 including I’Human which went to FX. Lavaf also was part of the Godzilla 2 writers room.

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The Twilight Zone featured image The Twilight Zone Movie Reboot Finds a New Writer

Currently there is no director attached to The Twilight Zone. Like Joseph Kosinski, War For the Planet of the Apes director Matt Reeves was at one point reportedly set to take on the job, but he eventually moved on as well.

The previous film version of The Twilight Zone released in 1983 was an anthology-style movie with four big-name Hollywood directors – John Landis, Steven Spielberg, Joe Dante and George Miller – each doing one of the four stories. The movie was a modest success that unfortunately is best-known today for the tragic helicopter accident during shooting that claimed the lives of Vic Morrow and a pair of child actors.

Outside of the single-story format, nothing at all is known about Warner Bros.’ plans for The Twilight Zone. The original series ran from 1959 to 1964 and is considered one of the classics of early television and a pioneering effort in the arena of sci-fi/horror/general geek TV. Each episode was introduced by the cigarette-smoking Rod Serling, who also served as writer for many of the episodes, and most featured a final-act twist of the type that would one day become a signature move for M. Night Shyamalan (begging the question of why Warner Bros. has never pursued Shyamalan to write them a Twilight Zone script).

NEXT: 15 Things You Didn’t Know About the Original Twilight Zone

Source: Variety

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