Tron Legacy to Have Five Full IMAX Sequences

Published 4 years ago by

tron legacy teaser trailer screening arg Tron Legacy to Have Five Full IMAX Sequences

For those of you who were excited when news hit that the upcoming Disney sequel, Tron Legacy, would be getting a 3D IMAX release, you’ll probably be interested in the following news: the movie will feature five sequences shot in full HD IMAX aspect ratio, a la The Dark Knight.

Peter Sciretta from /Film and Alex Billington from First Showing recently got a chance to get some info from Tron Legacy director, Joseph Kosinski, after the disappointing special worldwide Tron Legacy event that was held this past weekend. After Peter told Kosinski how great it was to see the trailer in IMAX filling up most of the screen, the director revealed that five of the sequences in the actual movie will follow suit.

The sequences will be shot with IMAX cameras and presented in the expanded 1.7:1 aspect ratio as opposed to the usual 2.35:1 widescreen ratio you get when stretching pictures shot with regular cameras to IMAX size. If you’ve ever forked over your hard-earned cash to see a movie in IMAX, you’ll know that most of the time the whole screen isn’t filled with picture and instead you get the big black bars at the top and bottom. Although you’ll still be getting that with the Tron sequel, for the five sequences in question almost all of the screen will be filled with glorious 3D HD IMAX images.

If you’ve never seen a movie in IMAX then all that may not sound like much, but when you actually see the visuals, you’ll surely notice the difference. And since Kosinski says the sequences are action ones, I take it they won’t be moments where characters are just standing around talking…

Tron Legacy new image 570x323 Tron Legacy to Have Five Full IMAX Sequences

If this IMAX aspect ratio talks sounds a bit familiar that’s because The Dark Knight did a very similar thing back in 2008: Even though the whole movie wasn’t shot for “true IMAX,” certain scenes were filmed using IMAX cameras, resulting in more of an immersive experience at the movie theater.

In order to help anyone out who needs it, Peter over at /Film has kindly provided an image to illustrate the difference between the “true IMAX” and normal aspect ratios. Admittedly, Peter says, it’s not exact but it gives you a good idea. You can head over to /Film to take a look.

Remember the WHOLE of Tron Legacy in IMAX won’t be shown in the larger 1.7:1 aspect ratio, just five special sequences shot with IMAX cameras. But nonetheless, if you’re inclined to pay that bit extra to get a more immersive experience, it’s good to know we’ll be getting something extra special.

tron legacy trailer video Tron Legacy to Have Five Full IMAX Sequences

I wouldn’t normally go see a movie in IMAX but the fact that certain sequences are going to be shown in “true IMAX” is enough incentive for me to pay that bit extra to catch it in that format. As a pre-release bonus of sorts, /Film was also told that we’ll be getting an IMAX trailer online to show the difference between IMAX and the normal format.

Are you glad that we’ll be getting some special sequences in full IMAX? Or does it not make a difference to you?

Tron Legacy is released in 3D IMAX and regular theaters on December 17th, 2010.

Source: /Film

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13 Comments

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  1. What a load of hoo-haw. This is as much IMAX as Panavision is Cinerama. IMAX is 70mm, the screen isn't in your lap and there is no Screen Door effect, this should be labeled something like “Not IMAX, but a remarkable simulation!”.

  2. Faux-IMAX ;-)

    It's good they are trying to add value to the experience. You have to give them that but I'm not sure it's an “A” for effort. More like a “B+” which is acceptable if the story is entertaining. Given that I haven't been so jaded by the technology in just two years since the “Dark Knight” and the fact that its been so long since “TRON” and because they bothered to get Jeff back, the effort passes muster to spend a few extra dollars. They can't count on repeat viewings though. It would have to rate five star for that…

  3. I must say, I am spoiled in that my earliest and most frequent IMAX experiences have been on the giant OmniMAX screen in the Reuben H. Fleet in San Diego, so I even got to see “This is Showscan” by Doug Trumbull on that huge hemisphere. Seeing “Star Trek” on one of these Digital IMAX screens and realizing that it was basically two 2K projectors in an Over/Under arrangement with the screen moved forward two rows to make it seem bigger, and that the moving mosaic was something I had to get used to, I just felt cheated…and spoiled.

  4. Ah… That explains it you have pursued a refined aesthetic sensibility. That is many times a rare opportunity. Careful you don't take it for granted. Hey check this for some perspective… :-)

    http://www.snopes.com/science/stats/populate.asp

  5. What a load of hoo-haw. This is as much IMAX as Panavision is Cinerama. IMAX is 70mm, the screen isn't in your lap and there is no Screen Door effect, this should be labeled something like “Not IMAX, but a remarkable simulation!”.

  6. Faux-IMAX ;-)

    It's good they are trying to add value to the experience. You have to give them that but I'm not sure it's an “A” for effort. More like a “B+” which is acceptable if the story is entertaining. Given that I haven't been so jaded by the technology in just two years since the “Dark Knight” and the fact that its been so long since “TRON” and because they bothered to get Jeff back, the effort passes muster to spend a few extra dollars. They can't count on repeat viewings though. It would have to rate five star for that…

  7. I must say, I am spoiled in that my earliest and most frequent IMAX experiences have been on the giant OmniMAX screen in the Reuben H. Fleet in San Diego, so I even got to see “This is Showscan” by Doug Trumbull on that huge hemisphere. Seeing “Star Trek” on one of these Digital IMAX screens and realizing that it was basically two 2K projectors in an Over/Under arrangement with the screen moved forward two rows to make it seem bigger, and that the moving mosaic was something I had to get used to, I just felt cheated…and spoiled.

  8. Ah… That explains it you have pursued a refined aesthetic sensibility. That is many times a rare opportunity. Careful you don't take it for granted. Hey check this for some perspective… :-)

    http://www.snopes.com/science/stats/populate.asp

  9. Nothing in Tron is being shot with IMAX cameras! If you read the /Film report, Kosinski has made it clear he's shooting the entire film with digital cameras, and the the IMAX version of the film will simply have select scenes with a taller aspect ratio.

  10. “IMAX HD” or “HD IMAX” is a loaded phrase. IMAX invented an HD 1570 system, that ran at 48fps, not 24. It is still used in the Disney Soarin’ California rides. The special Tron scenes will fill the 1.43:1 screen found at original 1570 film based installations. The “digital IMAX” screens are at 2:1, and the image will be cropped on those digital IMAX screens, and regular 35mm venues.

  11. Went today for my third IMax3d experience, I was so disappointed with the 2d experience I saw, I asked management for a refund and got it. Avatar and Hubble 3d blew my mind, not this though. The trailers for Green Hornet and Thor looked good with the IMax 3d glasses, so hopefully they will be movies filmed in Imax3D.
    Theaters shouldn’t be able to list and charge for a movie as IMax 3D if it wasn’t filmed in it.
    Rantoff
    Rich

  12. My first experience to IMAX was Tron Legacy…and it blew me away…yes I noticed the scenes that were not IMAX, but when the scenes that were part of the experience showed up I was awed… That is just me…my expectations were not jaded from other movies or IMAX specials…but it did ensure that if a movie I REALLY want to see is in IMAX format then I will spend the extra money and time to go see it…

  13. it annoys me that they’re going to release the film with changing aspect ratios. Everyone’s tv is 16:9, and the best parts of the film are filmed in 16:9, so why not release the film in general as a 16:9 film? What is the point of having a 2.35:1 AR in this day and age? I find the “so it’s not confused with TV” to be extremely antequated.

    I hope more directors cop on that 16:9 is the future (and past) of AR (as seen in every tv today, proper 3D and IMAX) and use it as a standard :)

    I’ll never understand paying for a 50″ TV and using maybe 35″ with some films….

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