Shia LaBeouf recently shared his opinion on the potential of Transformers 3 with the Huffington Post and his outlook is good. Then again, it can’t get much worse than Transformers 2, right? According to LaBeouf, Transformers 3 will go back to what made the first one more widely appreciated – humanity.

In other Transformers 3 news, the production has added The Kennedy Space Center in Florida to its wide array of filming locations. The shoot will take eight days in September at the same facility Bay used to shoot some scenes in Armageddon. But this news takes a backseat to LaBeouf’s comments.

Michael Bay has been a human dartboard for criticism. The fans are entitled to their opinions, but no filmmaker can ever get used to the sound of an actor bashing his film. Around this time last year, Megan Fox openly badmouthed the director for focusing on special effects rather than the acting. With Shia’s harsh words regarding Transformers 2, it may be time for Bay to re-think his approach.

Mind you, LaBeouf is a bit more diplomatic with his choice of words and he doesn’t exactly go out on a limb. It seems common knowledge Transformers 2 was not a film worthy of its $836 million worldwide box office. Blame its faults on whatever you want, but LaBeouf has his own theory:

“When I saw the second movie I wasn’t impressed with what we did…We got lost. We tried to get bigger. It’s what happens to sequels. It’s like, how do you top the first one? You’ve got to go bigger. Mike went so big that it became too big, and I think you lost the anchor of the movie…You lost a bit of the relationships. Unless you have those relationships, then the movie doesn’t matter. Then it’s just a bunch of robots fighting each other.”

Many directors allow the actors to provide insight on the plot and character arcs of the film. Maybe it’s time Michael Bay started taking some notes. The problem is, even though LaBeouf seems confident Transformers 3 will be better overall, his next comment just seems contradictory.

“There’s going to be a lot of death, human death. This time, they’re targeting humans…It’s going to be the craziest action movie ever made, or we failed.”

It’s got to be one or the other. Is the action bigger and crazier or is there more humanity and heart? Honestly, it is impossible to believe the two can coexist in a Michael Bay film. But according to fans in 2009, the movies are interesting because of robots, not actors. Let’s just see what happens when human lives are truly at stake in Transformers 3.

The additional news of Bay’s intention to film at The Kennedy Space Center is not simply passing fact. I checked the schedule and a shuttle launch is scheduled for mid-September. Maybe I’m stretching here, but Bay could be setting up to film the NASA launch. The approach would be similar to his own Armageddon, using real footage of shuttle launches to mimic the film’s team taking off. According to Space.com, the space shuttle Discovery is set to launch on September 16th.

Could he be planning on duplicating his strategy from Armageddon? Or does he simply want the massive hangars to house a few Transformers?

Bay has an uncanny ability to talk major government forces into heeding his every request. Throughout his career the cooperation from the armed forces and NASA has been unprecedented. It also makes his films more believable and engaging, while commercializing the technology America has used to fight the “evildoers.”

Transformers 3 continues to look like a good movie. Every piece of bad news, like the return of the “twins” gets shot down. The actors seem to be more optimistic. Set photos show signs reading “Robots Go Home,” which may prove an interesting dynamic between mankind and the robots. Either Bay and Co. will learn from their own mistakes or they will compound them.

What do you think of LaBeouf’s comments? Do they give the film any merit or are you still skeptical? What could they be filming at the Kennedy Space Center? Deliberate and discuss in the comments section below.

Source: CF News 13 via Collider, Huffington Post via /Film, Space.com