Fox Searchlight has settled on a U.S. release date for Trance, a heist-thriller from Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours). It’s taking a spot previously reserved for parent 20th Century Fox’s female buddy comedy The Heat, which is moving back to the summer.

The Heat stars Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy as an uptight federal agent and uncouth Boston cop, who team to take down a drug lord. Bridesmaids director Paul Feig handled helmer duties, working from a script by Katie Dippold (Parks and Recreation). While the trailers haven’t been all that encouraging, The Heat stands to benefit from its new June 28th date, as counter-programming to the comic book sequel Kick-Ass 2 and Roland Emmerich thriller White House Down (which also open that day).

Trance is taking the spot vacated by The Heat on April 5th, where the competition includes Jurassic Park 3D and limited releases for Robert Redford’s The Company You Keep and The Brass Teapot featuring Alexis Bledel and Juno Temple (trivia: Bledel played a small role in Sin City, while Temple appears in this year’s sequel A Dame to Kill For). All things considered, each title occupies such different genre territory that overlap shouldn’t be much of an issue, if at all.

Here is the synopsis for Trance, followed by the new poster:

Simon (James McAvoy), a fine art auctioneer, teams up with a criminal gang to steal a Goya painting worth millions of dollars, but after suffering a blow to the head during the heist he awakens to discover he has no memory of where he hid the painting.  When physical threats and torture fail to produce answers, the gang’s leader Frank (Vincent Cassel) hires hypnotherapist Elizabeth Lamb (Rosario Dawson) to delve into the darkest recesses of Simon’s psyche.  As Elizabeth begins to unravel Simon’s broken subconscious, the line between truth, suggestion, and deceit begin to blur.


The Trance trailer makes the film look as visually-sophisticated and artistically-resonant as everything else Boyle has created to date. However, the story and content – loosely based on screenwriter Joe Ahearne’s 2001 TV movie Trance – is pulpier than his last few movies; not to mention, Boyle’s latest appears to be more of a wild thrill ride than meditative drama (127 Hours) or high-minded storytelling (Slumdog Millionaire). Mind you, that doesn’t mean it’s bad, just not obvious Oscar bait that’s ripe for a release closer to the year’s end.

Source: 20th Century Fox, Fox Searchlight Pictures