As is now the typical response by studios behind the various television series on the receiving end of the proverbial network axe, the makers of The Killing are reportedly interested in staving off the show’s death by shopping it around to numerous other television networks.

Last week, AMC made the announcement that it would not be seeking a third season of the once critically acclaimed murder mystery, after the second season failed to garner sufficient enough ratings to warrant the series’ continuation.

Of course, it likely won’t be long before the name Netflix pops up as a potential contender for the series, as the streaming content provider is now seemingly obliged to feign some interest in every serialized drama that has been given its walking papers in the past few years. It’s worth noting however, that even though Netflix has been briefly associated with the resurrections of recently canceled programs like Terra Nova and The River, the only show it’s actually had enough interest in is Arrested Development – a series last seen on television in 2006.

Besides wondering what network a dark, character-driven drama such as The Killing might be able to call home, selling the show may be too much of a problem for any legitimate interest to arise. As fans will note, executive producer Vena Sud and AMC underwent a maelstrom of criticism after season 1 ended with the main character, Det. Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) being served up yet another red herring, instead of the answer to the mystery nearly every viewer believed they had been promised. Following that debacle – which resulted in AMC head of original programming Joel Stillerman issuing a statement about how the network and the show may have better managed fans’ expectations – The Killing never quite seemed to recover.

That kind of baggage almost certainly led to the poor ratings performance of The Killing in season 2. The April premiere saw its ratings down a whopping 33 percent from the year before, with just 1.8 million viewers tuning in. Unfortunately for the series, those numbers continued to decline until the season finale, which garnered only 1.4 million viewers. Additionally, with the series wrapping up its central mystery of who killed Rosie Larsen, AMC took the declining numbers as a sign the series had reached its end.

Despite all that, the studio that produces The Killing still believes in the series enough to begin shopping it around. In a statement released shortly after AMC’s announcement that it was canceling the series, Fox Television Studios had this to say:

“Fox Television Studios is extremely proud of The Killing, the extraordinary writing staff and crew, and what we believe is one of the best casts on television. We will proceed to try to find another home for the show.”

If The Killing does find a new home, chances are, it will not resemble the program it once was – and that is likely a good thing. With the Larsen murder solved, the series would be forced to essentially recast nearly every character, with the exception of Det. Linden and her partner Det. Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman). Kinnaman addressed the need for a fresh start to the series soon after the second season wrapped up by saying:

“I feel like Linden and Holder [are] just [getting] started. I imagine that there would be a new case, and that Linden’s obsessive nature is not going to keep her away from police work for too long. It’s like the first season [of a show], where it [would] be original material and not based on the Danish [series] anymore.”

As it stands, many of the deviations made by The Killing from its source material – the Danish series Forbrydelsen – have been some of the most criticized aspects of the show. If The Killing were to continue, perhaps what it would need is a more direct translation of the original series.

Screen Rant will keep you updated on any progress made to land The Killing at another network.

Source: EW, TVLine