Somebody over at The Halcyon Co. should’ve been listening when Linda Hamilton’s Sarah Connor told us that the future isn’t certain in Terminator 2. Just a few months ago, a sequel to Terminator Salvation was all but guaranteed; then came the lawsuits between Halcyon (owner of the Terminator franchise rights) and Pacificor, the hedge-fund that sponsored Halcyon’s purchase of the Terminator rights.

Now, it seems that The Halcyon Co. (headed by Derek Anderson and Victor Kubicek) is so far in the red – between Terminator Salvation‘s underwhelming returns at the box office, the venture capital needed to buy the franchise rights and alleged manipulations by Pacificor to ensure Halcyon’s financial ruin – that the company is reportedly looking to sell off the Terminator rights to make a buck.

If you want to read details of The Halcyon Co.’s financial quagmire, go here. If you want to know about the convoluted history of the Terminator franchise rights, go here.

When word of this Halcyon/Pacificor legal battle emerged back in August, we here at Screen Rant wondered what kind of effect the legal fallout would have on Terminator 5, which Salvation director McG was already prepping. Now that this new report has surfaced, it seems that Sarah Connor’s prophetic words of “No Fate” are coming to pass; until the rights to the Terminator franchise are secure in SOMEBODY’s hands, whatever time-traveling, future-warring plans there may have been should be considered wiped clean off the slate.

I for one am indifferent about all this: after I heard McG’s plans for Terminator 5 (hint: abandoning the future war storyline and returning to the present), I was like “I could live happily without that film EVER being made.” So, if the franchise rights DO get pushed out into the open market, I just pray that whoever snags them has a better plan in mind than Halcyon and McG did. I was NOT a fan of Terminator Salvation and was fearful that the franchise was well on the way to having whatever past greatness it had strangled out of it.

What do you think of these latest developments in the war over the Terminator franchise? Do you see an opportunity here, or should this franchise put set back on the shelf until (inevitably, if current trends are any indication) it’s time for a remake/reboot of Cameron’s vision?

Source: Film Junk