[Update: New details on exactly what’s being changed in the film]

Splice, the new film about genetic splicing gone wrong by Vincenzo Natali (Cube) is something sci-fi/horror fans have been looking forward to for sometime. The film’s reception at Sundance was a bit mixed – although, those that dug it really dug it.

The thing about film festivals is that they’re primarily attended by those who are film buffs in the truest sense; what goes over well at those festivals isn’t necessarily representative of the general movie going public.

Case in point: Splice. The film was picked up by Warner Bros. –  a move spearheaded by producer Joel “The Matrix” Silver – and was recently given a prime summer release date. However, in order for the movie to play better (according to Silver and WB’s standards) Splice is going to have to be…well, spliced.

Fangoria got a chance to speak with Natali about the changes being made to the film, and this is what the director had to say:

You’re going to see a slightly nipped-and-tucked version…it’s just going to be cosmetic…There are also a few things I’m changing after seeing the film with an audience. I believe what will come out of it will be a new and improved cut, but in essence, it’ll be the same film.”

For the full quote from Natali, you’ll have to hop over to Fangoria.

“Oh my god this ending was terrible… Oh my god this ending was terrible…”

Truthfully, I get nervous whenever I hear this kind of thing about alterations being made to a finished film, as it can really go either way. Then again, a recent case study like Paranormal Activity – which had alternate endings and recut scenes tailored for its theatrical release – demonstrates that a few changes made for the benefit of a wider audience aren’t always bad (Paranormal Activity’s original ending sucked).

Update: There’s been some question as to whether an alternate ending is the change being made to Splice. For those who are wondering, a brief quote from our friends at /Film:

What changes will [Natali] make? I made my own enquiries and confirmed that the only tweaks will come in “tightening up the ending”. Note: that’s tightening up, not overthrowing and replacing. The only question remains how many minutes are we calling the ending here? The last five? Ten? Twenty?

Time, along with unrated director’s cut DVD’s will determine if the changes being made to Splice are ultimately bad or good. I’m just happy to see the film getting a theatrical run.

Speaking of which, Splice will be in theaters on June 4, 2010.

Source: Fangoria

Update Source: /Film