Snowpiercer is a movie adaptation of the dystopian sci-fi graphic novel “Le Transperceneige,” by Jacob Lob and Jean-Marc Rochette. The film takes place on a post-apocalyptic Earth, where humanity has made a failed attempt to reverse the effects of global warming; instead, they’ve brought on the next Ice Age and left the planet largely uninhabitable – save for aboard the Snowpiercer, a train powered by a perpetual-motion engine (where the surviving humans reside).

Chris Evans (Captain America) plays one of the train’s passengers, who resides with the other lower-class individuals in the cramped and unsanitary rear cars of the Snowpiercer; meanwhile, the more privileged passengers – whose ranks include Tilda Swinton – live in comparative luxury, in the comfortable and well-kept portions of the train. A revolution begins to take shape, led by Evans – but will it change anything?

Snowpiercer is the English-language debut for Korean filmmaker Joon-ho Bong (The Host), who co-wrote the script alongside Kelly Masterson (Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead). The supporting cast includes John Hurt (Immortals), Octavia Spencer (The Help), Ed Harris (Pain & Gain), Jamie Bell (The Adventures of Tintin) and Alison Pill (The Newsroom).

chris evans snowpiercer Snowpiercer Trailer: Chris Evans Leads a Rebellion on a Futuristic Train


The Snowpiercer international trailer suggests that Bong and his production team have created an impressively bleak and grimy version of the future, as populated by a very talented cast of character actors and actresses. It’s difficult to gauge what Swinton is saying – due to the trailer’s editing and her accent in the film – but she appears to be a worthy menacing and diabolical opponent for Evans and his fellow under-priviledged civilians. Similarly, the Wilford “character” could make for a good variation on the usual Big Brother archetype.

Problem is, Snowpiercer arrives at a time when there’s an over-abundance of thinly-veiled futuristic sci-fi parables about social inequality on the market (see: Elysium, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, etc.). Hopefully, Bong will prove to be an effective storyteller – even while making the jump to English – and bring something new to the ongoing “discussion,” in the process.

Snowpiercer doesn’t have an official U.S. theatrical release date yet, but is expected to arrive before 2013 draws to a close.

Source: CJ Entertainment International