The success of Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland has left Hollywood utterly convinced that revisiting classic fairytales which are now in the public domain is the key to striking gold at the box office.  As a result of this trend, yet another cinematic takeoff of Snow White is being shopped around for studio consideration.

This new Snow White project is titled Snow White and the Huntsman.  It features an expanded role for the Huntsman (the fellow the Evil Queen ordered to murder Miss White), who – according to Heat Vision – ends up “chained together [with Snow White] for part of the movie as they make their escape.” The Huntsman will reportedly be more of a mentor figure to Snow White, who will still eventually fall in love with Prince Charming.

Alice in Wonderland producer Joe Roth is one of the forces behind this new take on Snow White, which should not to be confused with director Brett Ratner’s more straightforward adaptation, The Brothers Grimm: Snow White or Walt Disney Picture’s upcoming Snow and the Seven – which, if you can believe it, involves the famous princess being trained by Shaolin monks to do battle against evil forces threatening Hong Kong (…).

The Huntsman script was written by Evan Daugherty, who also penned a draft of the screenplay for the upcoming Masters of the Universe movie.  Attached to direct is one Rupert Saunders, a commercial director best know for helming advertisements for the Halo games.

Mia Wasikowska in 'Alice in Wonderland.'

Snow White is not the only classic literary character whose face will soon grace the big screen once more.  Disney currently has a new take on Cinderella in the works, along with its Sleeping Beauty-inspired Maleficent project and a movie based around Peter Pan‘s Tinkerbell.  That is not to mention the numerous Wizard of Oz-inspired films in the works or Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters. 😛

Filmmaking is an expensive business and studios generally consider it safer to invest in a project based off an already-established property, rather than take a risk on something for which there is no guaranteed market.  Features like Inception have already demonstrated pretty handily that brand recognition need not always be the case for a film to succeed at the box office – so when is Hollywood going to take that hint?

Source: THR