It’s hard to come up with much of anything new to say about Snow White and the Huntsman that hasn’t already been pointed out or discussed ad nauseum, at this point. Fortunately, we don’t have to: the film’s raw behind-the-scenes footage (or B-roll, if you will) and several clips from the final product, speak for themselves.

The behind-the-scenes material showcases the cast and crew of Snow White and the Huntsman working on location around the English countryside – along with scenes shot on the impressively-constructed set piece that is the fortress castle of Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron). Once again, if you didn’t know any better, you might think this was B-roll footage for a Ridley Scott production like Kingdom of Heaven or Robin Hood – given the sheer scale of the proceedings used to convincingly create a filthy Medieval setting.

Many of the scenes shown in the Snow White and the Huntsman B-roll footage are featured in finished form above – including, the previously-released final (?) encounter between Snow (Kristen Stewart) and her malicious step-mother (Theron).

We also get a better look at the film’s different interpretations of the Snow White fairy tale’s supporting players, such as the eponymous Huntsman (Chris Hemsworth), who begins as a lost soul with little purpose to his life; the prince (Sam Claflin), upgraded from a nice, handsome guy to a badass bowman; and the famous dwarfs, who are presented as much more wild-looking and threatening figures than is customary (with beloved character actors like Bob Hoskins, Ian McShane and Toby Jones filling out the parts). It also continues to look more and more likely that Theron’s performance as the evil queen could end up stealing the movie.

As for Stewart as the famous fairy tale princess: she doesn’t look to offer much competition for Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games when it comes to landing the title of “Best Young Heroine of 2012.” Much like Lily Collins in this spring’s Snow White retelling, Mirror Mirror, the Twlight actress appears to do an overall competent job, so as to not detract from everything else.

As mentioned before, there’s little more to be said about Snow White and the Huntsman until we see the actual film. What has been shown, however, has made a good impression and suggests this movie could be a great example of how to properly update a recycled story for an age where darker and grittier fare reigns triumphant – without sacrificing the substance of the original mythology. That quality will become all the more coveted in the future, as the trend of Hollywood reboots and remakes continues to thrive.

Snow White and the Huntsman opens in theaters around the U.S. on June 1st, 2012.

Source: Universal [via Collider]