Friday nights used to be the graveyard for television programs. If you were scheduled to air on Friday night, you were doomed.

Though that might still generally be the case, modern times are changing perspectives on how ratings are looked at by the advertisers. Now-a-days, ratings are considered by many to be the live viewing plus 7 days to be a growing statistic, and if you really think about it, it might even go longer.

But ads have a certain amount of relevant, useful time to their message. So for now, we’re sticking to 7 days. With that said, it’s interesting to see that of the top 5 shows in the top of the DVR tables, 3 of them are Friday night shows.

1- Smallville on the CW (1.3) (44%)
2- Dollhouse on Fox (1.4) (40%)
3- Fringe on Fox (3.0) (36%)
4- Castle on ABC (2.9) (32%)
5- Numb3rs on CBS (2.1) (31%)

Smallville, Dollhouse and Numb3rs are the Friday night shows from that list. Those numbers in parenthesis represent the household rating after 7-day DVR viewings have been added in and the percentage increase of viewers by DVR in those 7 days.

Now that looks like a great increase for both Smallville and Dollhouse, but we need to stay grounded in this new bit of exciting information. These numbers are 40-44% of already small numbers.

For example, Dollhouse’s live viewing came in at a 1.0 and increased to a 1.4 rating after adding DVR viewings.  Smallville jumped to a 1.3 rating.

(Eh?  A 1.0 represents 1% of all estimated households watching television. In 2008, total households were estimated at 112,800,000 households.)

That would guesstimate out to Smallville having roughly 1.5 million, and Dollhouse – 1.6 million viewers.

Looking at the numbers, admittedly we’re pretty prepared to watch Dollhouse be let go by Fox, and the scary aspect is that Dollhouse has better numbers than Smallville!

Even though numerically, the numbers tell all, The CW seems to have a different take on how well their shows perform. Their hits, though setting ratings records in their own books, still don’t really scratch the surface of the other shows. But they seem to accept that and move on.

This can’t be bad news for Smallville at all…  but don’t ask me to hold my breath!  Advertisers have a funny way of looking at things and pressuring the programming.

Footnote: These numbers were NOT TOTAL VIEWERS. They referenced the 18-49 demographic of viewers, one of the desirable spending demographics that watch television.

Source:  TV By The Numbers