In Hollywood, you don’t always get to hear straight talk, but that’s just what reporters heard from Shia LaBeouf this past weekend at the Cannes Film Festival.

While at Cannes promoting Wall Street 2, LaBeouf took some time to address fan criticism over Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull and why he believes he “dropped the ball” on the Indiana Jones legacy.

From the L.A. Times:

“I feel like I dropped the ball on the legacy that people loved and cherished…You get to monkey-swinging and things like that and you can blame it on the writer and you can blame it on Steven [Spielberg, who directed]. But the actor’s job is to make it come alive and make it work, and I couldn’t do it. So that’s my fault. Simple.”

LaBeouf also said that star Harrison Ford “wasn’t happy with it either” and that it’s important for those involved in the film to admit that they didn’t do their best work in order to regain credibility with the audience.

“I think the audience is pretty intelligent. I think they know when you’ve made — . And I think if you don’t acknowledge it, then why do they trust you the next time you’re promoting a movie.”

Interestingly, while LaBeouf was more than willing to accept personal blame for some of the film’s faults, he didn’t let Steven Spielberg off the hook either (humorously predicting that he would “get a call” from Spielberg over his comments).

“I’ll probably get a call. But he needs to hear this. I love him. I love Steven. I have a relationship with Steven that supersedes our business work. And believe me, I talk to him often enough to know that I’m not out of line. And I would never disrespect the man. I think he’s a genius, and he’s given me my whole life. He’s done so much great work that there’s no need for him to feel vulnerable about one film. But when you drop the ball you drop the ball.”

I admire LaBeouf for his candor and for accepting personal responsibility for his flaws, but I don’t know if it’s the smartest career move for him to criticize some of his highest-grossing films. After all, it was only last week that LaBeouf had similar criticisms of Transformers 2. Granted, LaBeouf is much more diplomatic in his criticism than some of his co-stars (such as the recently axed Megan Fox), but if he keeps up the Monday morning quarterback routine, it could burn some bridges in Hollywood.

Not that it matters, but I actually enjoyed Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Though it makes me an oddity among film fans (Screen Rant’s Kofi Outlaw put Indy 4 on his list of “Movies that Geeks Pretend Don’t Exist”), I think the movie is on the same par as Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom: fun and watchable, but not the best in the series.

Of course, that’s beside the point. The real question is, what do you think of LaBeouf’s comments? Do you agree with him or do you think he’s better off keeping his opinions to himself?

Source: L.A. Times