Screen Rant Focus: Twilight

Published 6 years ago by , Updated September 12th, 2013 at 10:40 pm,

With the books’ underlying themes of adolescent awkwardness and the struggle with sexual tension, Meyer had tapped into a powerful vein that young girls everywhere (as well as stifled housewives, still age eighteen in their heads,) could sink their teeth into. Combine that fan base with the always-thirsty sect of goth vampire-worshipers, and it’s easy to see just what kind of crowd would, well, crowd the halls of Comic-con, or the lobbies of bookstores everywhere, whenever Meyer pays a visit.

The fan base has grown to such massive size (mostly coordinated by the Internet) that they’ve been given their own monikers such as “Twilighters,” or (my personal favorite,) “Twihards.” The fan cults take things to the usual extremes: hammering Meyers with overly analytical questions like, “How do the Vampires resist when Bella is on her period? ” Or citing the series as the sole reason why they didn’t commit suicide. (A pretty flimsy reason to live, if you ask me). Thankfully for her, Meyer has a pillow made of money to rest her weary head on every night that the fan-mania leaves her drained.

Bloody Good Future

However, things are not all love in the Twilight universe. A quick glance at the customer reviews over at Amazon reveal two distinct camps of thought about the series: those who are obsessed with it, vs. those looking sideways at the those obsessed it, wondering just what the hell might be wrong with them. (As a graduate student studying creative writing myself, I can tell you that, technically speaking, Meyer’s craft has room for vast improvement – a fact even the author herself seems to be aware of.) Said Meyer about fan reaction to the first chapter of Breaking Dawn that she posted online:

”There were a lot of people,” says Meyer, laughing and throwing her hands up in the air, ”who said, ‘This isn’t the real first chapter, the writing is so bad!”

I’ll second that opinion.

However bad the writing may or may not be, it will make little difference come August 2nd, when Breaking Dawn hits shelves nationwide. Fans of the books are already invested so deeply in the Twilight universe that Meyer could write “all work and no play” for 200 pages and still turn a profit from the pre-sold copies of Breaking Dawn, which has been No. 1 on Amazon for weeks now.

Robert Pattinson (Edward Cullen) from Twilight

But movies, as they say, are a whole different animal. Actor Robert Pattinson (Harry Potter 4) found this out first-hand, when fans hit the Web in mass protest of his casting as Edward, Bella’s bloodsucking beau.

”I stopped reading after I saw the signatures saying ‘Please, anyone else,”’ Pattinson says, laughing.

Still, the scene at Comic-Con seems to suggest that many of the early wrinkles amongst fans have smoothed out since the film has edged closer to release; it’s almost assured that the film will be another solid payday for Meyer, and help push sales of the Twilight series even further through the roof than they already are.

twilight movie cast Screen Rant Focus: Twilight

As for Meyer herself? She is set to do a four-city tour for Breaking Dawn, before directing her focus to other upcoming projects, which include an adult romance/sci-fi book called The Host, (which sold for $600,000 at auction, and already has two sequels in the works); a ghost story called Summer House; and, for all those ‘Twihards’ out there: Midnight Sun, a retelling of Twilight from Edward’s vampiric point of view. Don’t count this lady out as a one-hit wonder. She just might be the next Anne Rice, reaping all that comes along with that title.

Are you a Twilight fan? Will you be camped outside bookstores and movie theaters trying to be the first to suck up all that Meyer’s vampire universe has bled? Or do you have yet to feed on her body of work? Let us know what you think.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

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TAGS: Comic-Con 2014, twilight

21 Comments

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  1. “However bad the writing, however…”

    This made me laugh. Sorry if it wasn’t intentional

  2. It certainly ain’t good. And “opening pageS”?? What is it, in 20-point type or something? What a gyp.

    And what the HELL is going on with Robert Pattinson’s hair??

    Let the onslaught begin…

  3. First off…It’s Stephenie Meyer (minus the “S”).

    Secondly, don’t diss it unless you read it. You too WILL get sucked into her incredible writing.

    MTR

  4. @ MTR

    Total romanticized crapola of the worst kind..Like I said before I tried to read one of the books twice…and I HATE to start a book that I don’t finish….but I had to toss it aside as it was unmitigated garbage!! IMO :)

  5. MTR, thanks, the article has been corrected.

    Vic

  6. and before the fangirls and “boys” start…I find her writing to be overly wordy in that she over uses adjectives and adverbs to make her dialogue seem more deep that it actually is…Poor Ed the tragic hero caught in the existential and “timeless” struggle that is basically a metaphor for teen angst and teen sexual fustration. Will he make her “Vampire” or won’t he…Cripers even the quote Meyer uses at the beginning of the book is from Genesis and represents how “choice” should be individualistic…WOW that’s real deep…Over simplified teeny-bopper romantic stuff… Now that’s a screen rant ;)

  7. to MTR

    MTR, first, let me apologize for the name mistake. I really pushed this article so that it could go up today. Second, I read half of Twilight, as I try to stay on top of all the latest trends in pop literature. I don’t think Mrs. Meyer is a TERRIBLE writer, just that she, like Rowling did, could stand to improve her craft. Her success speaks for itself, and should put the opinion of myself and others who echo it in the minority perspective we clearly hold. Enjoy Breaking Dawn, and the film.

  8. Isn’t this just a “Lost Boys” inspired Buffy the Vampire Slayer revision more or less based on a book yeah ok. Uuhmm

    Turning off “Notify me of followup comments. ;-)

  9. The book is incredible u just cant judge it before you even finish it. jeez ppl…. It’s an AMAZING book

    ppl who don’t get sucked into the story is just to dumb to understand it.

    and what’s up with the rival abotu HARRY POTTER and twilight fans going against eachother that’s stupid…it’s just a book
    DONT start a WAR over something like moving the movie DATE!!!

  10. oh and haha

    BELLA GETS PREGNANT!!!!!
    with a VAMPIRE/MORTAL BABY!!!
    SHE ALSO BECOMES A VAMPIRE.
    ALICE AND JASPER LEAVES>>>FOR A WHILE…
    SPOILER haha

  11. I agree, Ms. Meyer isn’t a perfect writer, but she has obviously managed to create a fictional world that attracted millions of readers. We have to give her some credit for that. How many writers can generate such sustained interest and sales figures? Not too many, if you ask me. I also don’t think that her aspirations include a Nobel prize in literature, so we can just give her a break. For a mass-market book, it’s still pretty okay.

    I have no problems with you criticizing Ms. Meyer and her literary shortcomings, but I found your comment about “stifled housewives, still age eighteen in their heads” incredibly arrogant and judgmental. I can easily accept the fact that you don’t like the Twilight series, but I don’t like your condescending attitude toward people who do. Reading and enjoying Twilight doesn’t automatically make them imbeciles.

  12. @Tamara

    I searched this entire page and nowhere do I see a comment or in the post itself a reference to “stifled housewives, still age eighteen in their heads.”

    Vic

  13. To Vic

    Open your eyes dude, look at the top of the page and you shall see clearly “stifled housewives, still age eighteen in their heads”.

    Also it’s AnnE Rice with an E!

    E.

  14. Ah, ok. I didn’t notice this was a two-page post.

    Well this is an opinion site and that was my writer’s opinion (although I probably wouldn’t have said that, myself).

    BTW, I corrected the spelling on Anne Rice.

    Vic

  15. @ Tamara:

    I concede. Truth be told, the story of a young girl falling for a young lad, with vampirism, thrown in as an innovative metaphor for sex and sexual desire, is an intriguing concept that can–no should– appeal to readers either young or adult, or any one else able to find delight in reading such a story. There are millions of examples to corroborate that claim. A housewife by no means has to be “stifled” (what does that even mean???) in order to appreciate the deep resonence–on a human level–of Bella and Edwards’ forbidden love.

    I formally apologize.

  16. LN, you wrote: “ppl who don’t get sucked into the story IS just TO dumb to understand it.” Bad usage aside, don’t you think you’re being a bit rude and presumptive? It’s as if you said, “anybody who doesn’t like these books is stupid.” Erm. . . how about matters of personal taste? Also, since Meyer has all the subtlety of a sledgehammer, I think most people who read the books “get it.” Just because they “get it” doesn’t mean they like it.

    I have read too many excellent books by too many excellent authors to have anything nice to say about Meyer’s clunky prose, her sloppy pacing (especially in the first book), her overdone detail, her melodramatic dialogue, and her shallow characterizations. By the end of Eclipse, her pacing has improved somewhat. But, IMO, her pacing is the only thing that has improved.

    Yes, in spite of Meyer’s fingernails-on-a-chalkboard prose style, I’ve read the first three novels. I did get sucked in by the story, particularly by the backstory of the Cullens, and by story of the werewolf boys of the nearby Native American tribe.

    I just wish the story had been in the hands of a more capable writer. Kofi, you make an excellent point about the forbidden love angle, as well as about the sexual metaphor. Adult women I’ve talked with about the books have said they identified with Bella, that they were taken right back to being seventeen again.

    Speaking of forbidden love, New Moon references Romeo and Juliet throughout the book. Eclipse references Wuthering Heights (it fits–Bella is as annoying a character as Cathy is–I found them both whiny and selfish).

    Books like these are snacks–Twinkies, fluffy with creme filling and easy to swallow. Nothing wrong with having a Twinkie once in awhile. Just don’t try to pass it off as tarte tropezienne.

    Respectfully,
    pr

  17. Serena- i just think that overall The Twilight saga is addictive and awesome! but thats just my opinion and u ppl r entitled 2 ur own but then again mama alwayz said ‘if u dont have anything nice to say dont say anything at all’ but i think Tamara and Kofi are at least considerately reasonable. p.s. Robert Pattinsons hair is gorgeous (sniff sniff is that jealousy i smell?)! oh and by the way how any one can read twilight and not instantly fall in love with it is a mystery to me.

    Lexy- I believe that Twilight the series and the movie are “da bomb”. I think that some guys who critisizes twilight are just jealous of Robert Pattinson (some), they probably check there wifes purse to make sure theres no edward souvenier. And of course some women would love to play Bella. Anyway…MTR & LN love ur comments and hope u keep posten.

  18. well said Bella is selfish and whiney like cathy really unlikeable and not the best person to have re-telling the story from her prospective, i was relieved for the interlude in BD to read from Jacobs point of view I dont understand how stephanie meyer managed to make the basis of the whole series of books so lacking in anything remotely likeable or redeeming in personality.
    As well as the unlikable lead there is also the problem of the language in the books all of those uncalled for ways to describe anything i read the words russet and alabaster about 50 times in the course of the series we get it the vamps are pale the shapeshifters are darker skinned it gets a tad condescending after a bit

  19. well said Bella is selfish and whiney like cathy really unlikeable and not the best person to have re-telling the story from her prospective, i was relieved for the interlude in BD to read from Jacobs point of view I dont understand how stephanie meyer managed to make the basis of the whole series of books so lacking in anything remotely likeable or redeeming in personality.
    As well as the unlikable lead there is also the problem of the language in the books all of those uncalled for ways to describe anything i read the words russet and alabaster about 50 times in the course of the series we get it the vamps are pale the shapeshifters are darker skinned it gets a tad condescending after a bit

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