When Saw 3D was released on home media with the name Saw: The Final Chapter, it was about as convincing as when the fourth Final Destination movie was called The” Final Destination i.e. not at all. Sure enough, Final Destination 5 came out just a couple of years later and brought back the tried and tested formula of a group of people escaping a terrible accident only to be picked in Rube Goldberg-esque ways because Death was having a sulk over being cheated.

The Saw franchise is undoubtedly the most successful within the niche horror subset of torture porn, evolving from the simple but effective short film made by director James Wan and writer Leigh Whannell (Insidious) back in 2003 to become an annual showcase of elaborate murder devices and then… well, the series never really evolved much beyond that.

By the time Saw 3D opened to an almost unanimous panning from critics, the franchise had pretty much run itself into the ground and has been left to lie dormant for over three years. Dormant but not dead, it seems, as Bloody Disgusting now reports that another Saw film is in “incredibly active” development at Lionsgate, according to multiple inside sources. According the report, some are favoring the idea of a remake whilst others are interested in ploughing ahead with another sequel.

While BD says that there is “nothing official on paper, nor a direction set in stone,” this is one rumor that is almost certainly true, and we’ve been expecting more news like this ever since Lionsgate Vice Chairman Michael Burns said last year that he was certain of Saw‘s eventual return. If anything, it’s surprising that it’s taken Lionsgate this long to get the series back on the road after Saw 3D made a respectable $136 million at the box office. Like the Paranormal Activity franchise, the Saw films are a big enough draw for audiences that they have made consistently decent profits with relatively low production costs.

The question of whether it should be a remake or a sequel is a tricky one, in the sense that it feels like picking the lesser of two evils. Since a remake would almost certainly mean recycling traps that everyone has already seen, it probably wouldn’t have the same audience pull as the sequels tend to. Another sequel might continue to burrow to new depths of badness, but if Lionsgate can find a screenwriter and director capable of supporting the inventive traps within the framework of a well-woven plot with interesting characters, there might still be hope for another decent Saw movie.

Tell us in the comments if you’re excited to play the game again, or if you think the Saw franchise needs to stay dead. If the former, should the next Saw movie be a remake or a sequel?

We’ll keep you updated on the next Saw movie as development continues.

Source: Bloody Disgusting