Director Sam Mendes’ James Bond installment, Skyfall, is actively obliterating previous franchise-high records at the overseas box office and aims to do likewise when it opens here in the States this Friday. Moreover, the critical buzz for the film is very strong, which explains why Skyfall co-writer John Logan has been recruited to script the next two 007 movies (with the first arriving in Fall 2014).

Mendes doesn’t expect to direct any future Bond flicks, but he is collaborating with Logan on a very different project: a team-up television series about famous 19th-century novel protagonists joining forces to hunt vampires.

If you read that description and thought of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (albeit, with vampires), you’re not alone. Deadline describes it as “an origin story set in the 1800s London” that unites classic literary characters in a manner that recalls Alan Moore’s LXG comic book-turned movie; furthermore, Van Helsing and Doctor Frankenstein are name-dropped as leads in Deadline‘s report. Logan wrote the pilot, with Mendes onboard to produce and possibly direct the first episode.

Interestingly, the news broke just last week that Hellboy and Pacific Rim director Gulliermo del Toro may be planning his own supernatural-themed team-up feature titled Heaven Sent, which would unite DC Comics staples like Swamp Thing, John Constantine, Deadman, and more. Comic book superhero team-up films are, of course, all the rage now after the unmitigated success of Marvel’s The Avengers, which makes it an ideal time for Mendes and Logan to get their ‘literary superheroes’ television show green-lit.

There are a handful of other classic horror literature-based projects developing right now (including, a Van Helsing reboot starring Tom Cruise) that could affect interest in Mendes and Logan’s show, in ways good and bad; similarly, memories of the lackluster LXG film might put a damper on enthusiasm for the show. Then again, the Skyfall duo have momentum on their side. Moreover, the prospect of those two bringing a concept similar to the LXG to life reads as quite enticing.

Vampire series are in no short supply right now, and that’s not going to change in the future (case in point: a TV show based on del Toro’s Strain trilogy is developing). However, as tired as some people are of the modern vampire craze, it sounds as though Mendes and Logan have a traditionalist approach to the genre in mind – as opposed to the Twilight-era portrayals of vampirism in such series as The Vampire Diaries (or the racier version in HBO’s True Blood).

Are you interested in a vampire hunter series uniting famous literary characters, as envisioned by Logan and Mendes?

Source: Deadline