Ryan Reynolds Calls ‘Green Lantern’ the New Star Wars [Updated]

Published 3 years ago by , Updated September 18th, 2012 at 8:13 am,

green lantern movie Ryan Reynolds Calls Green Lantern the New Star Wars [Updated]

Green Lantern is just two months away from its release date, and the studios are scrambling to make its CGI as convincing as it is bright green. Nine million additional dollars later, and people are still wondering if Hal Jordan’s mask will finally look like something real instead of something made in MS Paint.

Recently, star Ryan Reynolds and director Martin Campbell (Casino Royale) talked about the size, scope, and style of Green Lantern, calling it the new Star Wars, and Reynolds’ character – Hal Jordan – the Han Solo/Indiana Jones of the modern era.

When Hero Complex asked Reynolds what convinced hgim to sign on for Green Lantern, he said:

“I wandered through the art department, and that’s what sold me, seeing this universe that’s created and the scale of it all. They’re taking the Green Lantern canon from the comics and they’re extending it out into this new medium. Our goal is to make the first superhero who really goes on a Star Wars kind of epic journey, and this mythology goes back a lot further than Star Wars.”

Reynolds then discussed fans’ concern with the seemingly overly humorous tone of the first Green Lantern trailer:

“Tone was the biggest concern going in and then it almost became a contagion, and it became the concern of everyone and with me just harping on it. And now I feel that it’s the most exciting discovery as we kept going. No, it’s not dark like Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies, but it isn’t very light like you saw some of the [1980s] Superman movies get. The character is somewhere in the middle. He’s a classic male. Han Solo, who was witty but not really funny, was one of the touchstones.”

I don’t know; I think Han Solo was pretty hilarious.

Ryan Reynolds continued:

“It’s about courage versus fearlessness and the power of willpower and the need for sacrifice and service. This is not a comedy film but like Han Solo or […] Indiana Jones, there are moments where you smile and the hero can trades lines with anybody.”

Hero Complex then talked to Martin Campbell about what made him want to take on DC Comics’ most science-fiction-based superhero, to which he said:

“This was a chance to do some things I’ve never done before. We have a story that is very human and very much about human emotions, but what’s within that story takes us off-world and into some alien settings that are extraordinary.”

It’s debatable whether or not Green Lantern is Star Wars: The New Class (yeah, that’s right, that’s a Saved by the Bell reference right there), but it couldn’t hurt if that ended up being the case. And any time Ryan Reynolds emulates even a little bit of what made Han Solo and Indiana Jones so special, we, the fans, can only benefit from it.

That said, one of the reasons the original Star Wars trilogy – and the Indiana Jones films that came out prior to 1990 – were so incredibly successful as opposed to their later prequels (and sequel), was that they were so lived-in and real. All the effects were practical and physical and dirty and awesome – not fuzzy and glowing and semi-ethereal. Visually-speaking, Green Lantern seems to have more in common with Attack of the Clones (CG suits and all) than The Empire Strikes Back.

The good news, in my opinion, is that Green Lantern is looking better and better with every new trailer and image release. Not just visually, but also in terms of content. While, personally, it’s not the film I’m looking forward to most this summer, it’s definitely near the top, and I can promise you I’ll be there opening night – at midnight. And, you know, probably wearing all of my Green Lantern rings, too.

UPDATE: Well, if Green Lantern is the new Star Wars, then I guess these guys are the new Jedi Knights. Take a look at hi-res banner featuring some of the fan-favorite aliens from the Green Latern Corps!

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greenlanternmoviebanner Ryan Reynolds Calls Green Lantern the New Star Wars [Updated]

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Green Lantern, starring Reynolds, Mark Strong, Blake Lively, Michael Clarke Duncan, Peter Sarsgaard, and Geoffrey Rush, hits theaters June 17th, 2011.

Source: Hero Complex

TAGS: green lantern

53 Comments

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  1. Of course Reynolds would say something like that, he’s the star of the film!

    • lol yup

  2. This one, has finally started to get the excitement going for it, looking forward to it, As far as comparing it to the original star wars, thats a bit of a stretch for me. I will say this it does seem to have the grand scope that Star Wars managed to capture as far as Sci Fi goes.
    We have alot of great looking movies hitting the screen in the next few months and its nice to see most of them look like they are not going to disappoint.

    • But the question now becomes…..will it be Star Wars: A New Hope (the original) good or Star Wars: The Phantom Menace bad?

  3. Oh no he didn’t…. Nothing can ever be the new Star Wars. It is cool to get some inspiration from Star Wars but you can not replace that classic. It is good that they are targeting that type of success. There is nothing wrong with confidence. Han Solo…ok

  4. *laughs* I guess my comparisons to Episode I weren’t that far off.

  5. I’ll be there, too, holding my breath in anticipation!

  6. What I like about all the CBmovies coming out this year is that they are all so different in tone, character, location and time. It keeps them from being all lumped into one sub-genre of comic book movies. IMO

  7. how presumptuous. reynolds thinks he’s harrison ford. lol. like when justin bieber claimed to be the new kurt cobain…

    • Reynolds is an incredibly talented actor, I would put him on the same level as Harrison Ford was back when he was making good movies….if not better.

      • Agreed.

  8. Ben you made a little error at the end of the article. You said the movie releases on June 17th, 2001, instead of 2011

    • Thanks for catching that, Devin – fixed.

      Vic

  9. No problem Vic

  10. The new star wars was Phantom Menance and that sucked.

    Glad you guts caught that date airer.

  11. This movie will ROCK so hard!!!

  12. Looks better and better after each trailer. Looks like the movie has some substance to go along with it’s style.

  13. I think Ryan Reynolds just stepped on the sci-fi third rail. Nobody compares a Hal Jordan to Han Solo in the press and gets geek support.

    Which Han Solo is he talking about anyway?
    a) the slightly menacing, self-preservationist pirate from ANH
    b) the suave, swashbuckling, self sacrificing provocateur of ESB
    c) the rotund, just for laughs goof-ball from ROTJ

    I think RR just shot himself in the foot and should fire his publicist.

    • So he couldnt be a little of a, b, and c?

    • Wait — Han Solo was fat in Return of the Jedi?

      • I didn’t understand that particular word choice either…may we ALL be that version of rotund throughout our lives.

    • I’d go with B. That actually describes early Hal Jordan fairly well.

  14. When Hero Complex asked Reynolds what convinced hgim to sign on for Green Lantern, he said:
    Didnt you mean him?

  15. I know that Ryan Reynolds has to sell the film, since he’s under contract, but come on.

    This sounds almost as phony as when teeny-bopper groups, whether it’s N’Sync, or New Kids on the Block or the likes of Justin Bieber, name-dropping their favorite artists, who almost always are legends in the R&B — such as Marvin Gaye or Aretha Franklin.

    That’s great that they listen to them, but their music is NOTHING like their music.

    Same here. Sure, while Green Lantern may end up being the best movie ever, the best creation since sliced bread, I have my doubts. And Reynolds tries to argue that the movie is reminiscent of Star Wars?

    Again, I know he’s promoting the movie, but he did put out that comparison and I think it’ll encourage more scoffing and eye-rolling than anything else.

    Star Wars ended up being more than the sum of its parts. Many movies and other forms of entertainment used the same themes — before and after Star Wars, but few — if any — reached the level of Star Wars. The success of Star Wars can be attributed to many factors, as is the case with almost anything that becomes a cultural phenomenon, and timing is one of the big factors.

    Green Lantern may have the same thematic elements as the Star Wars movies and take notes from the Star Wars playbook, but will they all come together in the same way? Highly doubtful.

    I could go on and on, but it’s not worth it and ultimately, Reynolds is basically full of it. I say that as politely as I can. :)

  16. Lol I hope his acting isn’t as over the top.

    :)

    One day it would be great to read that an actor is mildly pleased with his new film.

  17. Well, after just hearing the news that Superman will be denouncing his American citizenship, I think I will be taking a pass on all things DC. GL included.

    • What ARE you talking about???

      • Check some news sites. Superman is denouncing his American Citizenship in an upcoming Action Comic (#900).

        http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/04/27/superman-renounces-us-citizenship/

        • Did you go on to read why he does that?! It’s because he doesn’t want his actions (good and bad) to be misconstrued as the actions of the American government or the country as a whole. He did it to keep other countries from declaring war on the U.S. because of him.

          • Thumbs up, Brian. I’m glad that not everyone here is a knee-jerk patriot regurgitating the nonsense that oft falls from the mouths of politicians, and sci-fi characters such as Anakin Skywalker: If you’re not with me, then you’re my enemy…

            • Why is it that 9 times of 10 online the word “patriot” is prefaced with “knee-jerk”?

              Vic

  18. What’s the deal with Supes Nautius?

  19. Clearly, Evil Space Pirate Jeff is the REAL modern-day Han Solo.

  20. I don’t know if maybe there are some quotes missing here, but Reynolds saying that “Green Lantern” will be “the first superhero who really goes on a Star Wars kind of epic journey” is, in my opinion, not the same thing as “calling it the new ‘Star Wars’”. Somebody’s intentionally trying to get the fans riled up over something that, at least in this article, is never said.

    • Well said, Gene.

      I readily spotted that, but it’s not at all surprising that there are people responding as if he said that Green Lantern is a Star Wars for 2011.

      But, having said that, he is obviously riding Star Wars’ coattails in order to pitch his movie. Just by making those comparisons, he is going to open himself up to criticism — he must have known that when he said what he said.

      And, ultimately, while he may think he’s just name-dropping in order to promote Green Lantern (just as Aaron Eckhart did by comparing Battle: LA to Dark Knight Rises in terms of feel/atmosphere), by choosing such a classic watermark in sci-fi as his selling point, by NOT saying it’s on par with Star Wars, his claim is rather meaningless.

      Also, his claim that they set out to make the first superhero who goes on a Star Wars kind of epic journey is debatable. And, also, that in itself says nothing of how good the movie will be. Just as Yoda says: “Try not. Do, or do not. There is no try.” :)

      • He also mentioned Indiana Jones. I think he was just grabbing for a comparison to how he envisions his character, and wanted an example that people would recognize. If he compared himself to Mal Reynolds from “Firefly”, how many people – everyday people, I mean, not us here – would have had any idea what he was talking about? I disagree that using “Star Wars” as an example is the same thing as riding it’s coattails. It’s just using a frame of reference that the widest audience will understand. Besides, what kind of PR would it be if he came out of the gate saying, “This ain’t no ‘Star Wars’”? I imagine everybody that makes a movie hopes that it will be the next “Star Wars”, just like every band would love to be the next Beatles and every TV show would love to be the next “Seinfeld”. Nothing wrong with a little optimism! Besides, if we don’t all hope for a new “Star Wars” someday, why bother going to the movies at all? What if George Lucas thought, “This ain’t no ‘Star Trek’”, and decided it wasn’t worth pursuing?

        • It is possible, I spoke too strongly because I have not read or seen his entire interview. He’s touching on cultural touchpoints in movies by citing Indiana Jones and Han Solo.

          While he may not be explicitly riding their coattails as I said before, he’s still using them in order to pitch his movie by using characters familiar to many.

          Anyway, my main point is: In doing so, it does create a certain set of expectations, whether he intends it or not.

          As I did try to say, I do understand why he did it, but it still rings sort of false and phony to me, in the same way those corporate making-of features are just 20 minutes of actors and others attached to a project gushing about how they had the best time of their lives on set, and how so-and-so director or actor is such a genius, etc. etc. I understand not everyone sees it the same way, nor do they have to, but that is my feeling on promotional junk from actors and others. IN GENERAL, I would just like more honesty, but corporations are about as honesty as scummy car salesmen or mechanics.

          • Michael,
            I understand what you’re saying about the phoniness of it all. I take any use of the word “genius” with a big grain of salt. And I agree that most of the making-of stuff is over-complimentary back-slapping. But I suppose that’s the point of “promotion”. There’s not much point in saying negative stuff about something you’re invested in. (See how well that worked out for Sean Connery when he bashed “League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” while it was still in production.) I do think that you can over-hype something, which this article (in my opinion) falsely accuses Reynolds of doing.

            I agree with your suggestion that there’s now a “certain set of expectations” that might be problematic. But where I disagree is regarding the source of those expectations. Reynolds isn’t raving about the movie in his quotes here. He talks about how excited he is to be in it (would we want an actor who said “Comics are stupid, but the money’s great!”), and how he’d compare his characterization to that of Han Solo or Indiana Jones. Martin Campbell says that the settings are “extraordinary”. None of that seems out of bounds to me. Yet the article is titled “Ryan Reynolds Calls ‘Green Lantern’ the New Star Wars”. The new expectations here are being set by the author, not Ryan Reynolds. And the author didn’t back up his claim here at all, at least not in my opinion.

            (As far as the “making-of” stuff – I much prefer to see a documentary or hear a commentary on an older film, when the people involved are much more comfotable saying things like “Boy, that was a stupid idea”, or “My co-star was a jackass”. I think you get much more candor after the film has had it’s day at the box office!)

  21. Wow I had no idea Superman finally woke up to the truth about our corrupt government.

    Awesome!

    • Cool. I give another thumbs-up to someone who’s not some knee-jerk patriot accepting hook, line and sinker what those in this society who truly run things (the corporations, the military industrial complex and the rich and wealthy) feed us.

      I’m sure there will be many who go off on “How Dare They Do That to AMERICA?!?” rants and boycott Superman for being a traitor, a communist, an illegal alien and such.

      • I think you guys are taking this too far in the other direction.

        To be pro-American, does not mean you have to support current politics.

        Superman has been an American and has fought for “truth, justice, and the American way”. He was seen as a patriotic super hero.

        Now… he just got watered down. Like the writers are trying to appease the world.

        By the way, it’s ok to be proud of your country. Even in hard times.

        • No it’s not, it’s uncool to be proud of your country! It’s cooler to just say you’re against it no matter what the situation is! And even cooler to continue living there while you’re complaining! Get with the times man!

        • Nautius…

          I read the entire story, and Superman does not DEnounce his American citizenship OR America, itself. He REnounces his citizenship (or states he is going to do so) precisely because he does not want America to be blamed for any of his actions. In this case, the action was not even anything bad, explicitly OR implicitly. He stood there in the middle of the potential battlefield and did nothing against either side, including when the pro-government gatherees began throwing Molotov cocktails at him (granted, they could not actually hurt him that way, BUT he didn’t even give them a disapproving look, much less react in any other way obviously open to him).

          He also admitted to the official chastising him in that excerpt you saw that he HAD made a mistake assuming that the Iranian government would simply view him as acting on his own; THEN, he gave the line that apparently angers you.

          Here’s the thing: Superman upset so many people (read some of the absolutely assinine comments posted on that comicsalliance.com page after the article) by doing EXACTLY WHAT WE ALL EXPECT HIM TO DO…supporting a questioning group’s right to demand better from its government WITHOUT interfering in their affairs OR those of the very government they’re questioning/protesting. On top of that, he tries, as always (as much as he is able in any given situation), to satisfy everyone by making sure the U.S. government knows he will not cause them such political difficulties again. He does what he’s always done–he takes care of the problem.

          Isn’t THAT attitude what makes America the hope of so many around the world? Yes.

  22. I read the link Brian and took it as more of Superman distancing himself basically to stay out of the political theater, but its virtually the same thing more or less. This works both ways for Superman (in the comics).now he doesn’t have to follow the direction of our false wars and bs enemies.

  23. Seems more like the next “Ice Pirates” than “STARWARS”

  24. He did not say the Green Lantern was the new Stars Wars. He said their goal was to make the first super hero go on a Star Wars epic journey and the mythology goes back further than Stars Wars. If you are a fan of the comics it was 1st published in the 40′s which puts in space about 30 years before the first Stars Wars movie which was filmed in the 70′s.

    • Yeah the first Green Lantern comics came out in the forty’s, but the Green Lantern did not go into space at all. The ring’s origin was magical and came from Earth. It wasn’t until the 60′s (I think) that Green Lantern was revamped and started taking place in space. Still before Star Wars though.

  25. There’s no way this will be the new Star Wars, well, maybe the new new Star Wars, as in Episodes 1-3, but no way as good as Episodes 4-6…

  26. I think starting out going to Oa, and including the entire G.L. corps, was starting out too broad,but we’ll see. I’m ok with the star wars analogy. R.R. was just attempting to be descriptive and was reaching for an example. He was portraying a larger than life hero in the movie, and those H.F. characters were probably a big influence on him. As for that Superman news that spilled over in to this article, I think that the fact they’re publishing that story says that comic books and superhero characters have edged too far into reality.

  27. I can see where RR is coming from comparing Hal Jordan to Han Solo, that’s the same thing that I’ve said on here months ago and he is right about the similarities. Han Solo’s cockyness, swhashbuckling pilot and adventurous persona is what I’ve always gotten from Hal Jordan and by no means am I an expert on either character but the two do resemble each other a lot in some aspects. Han Solo makes cocky remarks and ends up being funny at times in certain situations while being quite serious. The same similarity with Indiana Jones but neither of those characters are tongue in cheek, one-liner types or ever really “TRIED” to be funny. The problem with RR’s Hal Jordan so far, is that it seems as though he comes off as “trying” to be funny. Whether he IS funny or not is not the point, the point is that Hal Jordan was never a one-liner quoter or cracked jokes, that’s the Flash’s job. Although I have read some Green Lantern comics in the past, I was never a fan and I’m still not. However, I do hope this movie does well and I’d like to see the sequels based off of the other major earth born Lanterns.

  28. one thing i feel strange ab the movie is tat y the aliens cn speak eng

    • Arnold…

      The ring acts as a universal translator. We just hear it in English because it’s an American film.

      If the film were to be made by a French studio (or be about a French hero), everyone, humans and aliens alike, would be speaking French. Same with German, Dutch, Spanish, etc…

  29. The poster makes the movie look like a bad cartoon with a masked human head floating around in it.
    As for this movie being the next Star Wars……come on…really???
    The movie must be really bad for them to be making comparisons like that.

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