The six years that passed between Rush Hour 2 and 3 weakened the box office for the latter (global gross dropped from $347 million to $258 million), and general critical consensus pegged Rush Hour 3 as one sequel too many for the international buddy-cop franchise. Series staple Chris Tucker emerges from semi-retirement this fall with The Silver Linings Playbook, and it seems the Rush Hour property is likewise getting back in the game before costar Jackie Chan hangs up his action hero hat.

Read on to learn what franchise producer Arthur Sarkissian (CBS’ Vegas) has in mind for Rush Hour 4, with Tucker reprising his role as a big-mouthed American cop (Carter) who teams up with Chan’s disciplined Chinese martial artist/officer (Lee).

Sarkissian offered Crave Online the following Rush Hour 4 update:

 “I’m trying to do it closer to how I did Rush Hour 1, more down to earth, more gritty, introduce two new characters and make it real the way the first one was. I personally was not happy with the third one. I thought 1 and 2 were very good. I think 3 got out of hand a little bit. It’s not a matter of just bringing them back to do another segment of that or a sequel to it by putting them in another city and having them bicker. I don’t want that. I want something new.”

rush hour 4 developing Rush Hour 4 Will Take the Fast Five Approach


Rush Hour franchise director Brett Ratner is not what you would call a fan-favorite (more like a glorified punching bag), and Sarkissian didn’t seem all that enthused about his return for a fourth installment either, saying “If he wants to do it he’s more than welcome to do it but he’s got to do it in the right way.” That would be as follows:

“One of the things that surprised me and actually excited me was how they did Fast Five. They kept the characters, they took them and they put them in a whole different world. They put them in the world of a heist movie and it worked. I think that was brilliant [because] if you’re not careful, what happens is you just keep repeating yourself. There’s not much you can do.”

Sarkissian offered no explicit insight as to how Rush Hour 4 could follow Fast Five and rejuvenate the flailing franchise, beyond a generalization about the importance of “creativity and energy and good thought and a little bit of hard work.” It’s also worth noting that F5 arrived hot on the heels of Fast & Furious, which revitalized that high-thrills series in the aftermath of the underperforming Tokyo Drift.

Rush Hour 4, by comparison, cannot stray so far from the beaten path if it wants to convince the pre-established fanbase that the film is a continuation of what they loved from previous installments. Sarkissian agrees with that idea, saying:

“Absolutely not, because you will have the characters, it will be the two of them. They’ve got to be in a world where it’s not just fighting with one another.”

We’ll keep you updated on Rush Hour 4 as the story develops.

Source: Crave Online