A few months back, Screen Rant reported that Robert Patrick (the liquid metal T-1000 from Terminator 2) was being eyed by Terminator Salvation director McG for a possible role in the sequel to Salvation, which has already been green-lit.

Well now Robert Patrick has responded to the rumors, saying that he is ready and willing to jump back into the Terminator universe.

For those wondering just how a much-older Robert Patrick would fit into the new continuum being established by Terminator Salvation, here’s a quick recap of McG’s vision for his character:

“I like the idea in a prospective next picture that you meet Robert Patrick the way he looks today, and he’s a scientist that’s working on improving cell replication so we can stay healthier and we can cure juvenile diabetes and all these things that once again sound like good ideas — and once again live as an idealized expression of ourselves. So imagine seeing a sixty-year-old Robert Patrick and knowing, ‘Holy shit! That’s gonna be the T-1000 – who comes back perfect, lean and the whole thing.’ I haven’t concluded that, but Robert and I had dinner the other night and talked about it…”

That’s… actually a very clever way to handle it: well-intentioned scientist unintentionally creates the ultimate killing machine for Skynet. It works well on a variety of levels (man engineering his own destruction, etc.).

However, I’m not guy who has to be sold on the idea. So how does Robert Patrick feel about McG’s proposed storyline for the origin of his T-1000 character?

“Yeah, he talked to me about it,” said Patrick. “I’m interested. I was listening to him tell me about it. I had no idea that he thought about that. I love McG. He’s a great guy. I’ve worked with him before, had a great experience working with him both times… And I certainly can’t think of anybody to tackle T4 other than him right now. I think he’s got the energy for it and the passion for it. I know he’s a fan of the movies. I think he’ll do a fantastic job. I’m interested to see what Christian Bale does with John Connor. I’m interested to see the whole setting for that…

“…so we’ll see what happens. The sci-fi genre, and specifically that character, is something I’m very proud of. It’s what broke me out big to the world. And it’s a character that I’ve lived with ever since, and I kind of carry it with me everywhere I go, for good or bad. So it’s obviously something that’s very dear to me and real special to me. That was a real special time. That franchise means a lot to me. All of those people were great people to work with. I love ‘em all – Jim Cameron and Arnold and Linda and Eddie. It was a real, real special time in my life.”

Based on that quote we know that Robert Patrick still has a warm spot in his heart for the Terminator franchise, and that he is at least interested in the storyline that McG is pitching.

Man, I really hope this happens. The T-1000 is, to this day, one of my top five scariest villains of all time. I was only ten when my parents took me to see Terminator 2; the notion of a killing machine that was nearly indestructible and could morph into anyone, even your closest friend, was enough to make me paranoid for months and months after. I would love to feel that chill run down my spine again.

More to the point though: it’s been hinted that the Terminator Salvation franchise will chronicle the events that occurred after Judgment Day, leading up to the time-traveling plotlines of T1 and T2. The T-1000’s origin is certainly a part of that story, and if this franchise is going to be done right, there can be no loose ends left untied. It’s hard for me to see how they would tie those ends off without Robert Patrick at least making an appearance (after all, the T-1000 had to copy that face from somewhere!).

What do you think? Do you think that future installments of the Terminator Salvation franchise need to have Robert Patrick present in order to deal with the T-1000 origin? Or is it a corner you feel the filmmakers can get away with cutting?

Terminator Salvation hits theaters on May 22, 2009.

Source: Fear.Net via IESB