In July of last year we reported on the fact that Inglourious Basterds writer/director Quentin Tarantino is planning on some day doing a Western of some sort. It’s a genre he’s a big fan of and even tipped his hat to a couple of times on-screen (Spaghetti Westerns in Kill Bill Vol.2, and he appeared in a small role as a cowboy in the Japanese film Sukiyaki Western Django as seen in the above header).

However, with the amount of ideas Tarantino has in his head for movies – from a remake of Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! to a third Kill Bill – it’s hard to think that we’ll see a Tarantino take on the Western genre anytime soon.

However, in an update to the possibility, Tarantino recently spoke to NY Daily News about doing a Western and revealed some interesting info about what he has in mind for it. As a huge fan of the man, my immediate thoughts on what a QT Western would be like is within the framework of a regular Western but littered with references to previous movies within the genre and with the violence played up for (black) comedy.

But Tarantino has something different in mind – instead of it being a Western per se, it would be “A Southern.” What’s that, I hear you ask? I’ll let Tarantino explain:

“I’d like to do a Western. But rather than set it in Texas, have it in slavery times. With that subject that everybody is afraid to deal with. Let’s shine that light on ourselves. You could do a ponderous history lesson of slaves escaping on the Underground Railroad. Or, you could make a movie that would be exciting. Do it as an adventure. A spaghetti Western that takes place during that time. And I would call it ‘A Southern.'”

The word “controversy” immediately comes to mind. A loose take on the Western genre involving telling the tale of slaves in the South of the US? And not only that but make it an “adventure” of sorts? As the guys over at Cinemablend cleverly point out, I’m sure Spike Lee will have a field day calling Tarantino out on THAT one (FYI, Lee has had a problem with QT using the “N” word too much in his movies for years).

However, you have to hand it to QT for coming up with an original way to do a Western than the million and one other ways we’ve seen in the last century. And I’m sure along with the hook of a new take on the genre we’ll get the trademark witty dialogue we’ve come to expect from Tarantino’s work. I’m very intrigued to see what becomes of this project, although with Inglourious Basterds taking 10 years to hit screens I’m not gonna’ hold my breath for a Western from the director within the next few years.

Do you like what Tarantino has in mind for his Western? Do you think the “Southern” slave idea would cause a lot of controversy?

Source: NY Daily News