‘Transcendence’ Writer Jack Paglen in Talks to Pen ‘Prometheus 2′

Published 1 year ago by , Updated June 18th, 2013 at 7:01 am,

Prometheus Alien Transcendence Writer Jack Paglen in Talks to Pen Prometheus 2

June 2012′s Prometheus was Ridley Scott’s return to the sci-fi universe of his original Alien and a particularly divisive summer blockbuster. The prequel (of sorts) grossed over $400 million worldwide on a budget of around $130 million, which wasn’t the massive success 20th Century Fox was hoping for, but enough to justify a sequel.

Ridley Scott’s involvement seemed beyond question – his Scott Free banner was going to be involved, even if Scott ended up producing. Considering Prometheus’ story was the subject of great debate surrounding the film, a big question was whether or not Damon Lindelof – the Lost alumnus who heavily rewrote Jon Spaihts’ original script – would be returning.

Though we’ve known for a while that Lindelof was probably not returning, now we know who might be replacing him: Jack Paglen, the screenwriter whose original sci-fi project Transcendence will be The Dark Knight Rises cinematographer Wally Pfister’s directorial debut, is in talks to pen the as-yet-untitled Prometheus sequel. While Paglen is currently “in talks” to officially join the project, The Wrap believes negotiations will “quickly lead to a deal.”

This is quite a coup for Paglen, whose script for Transcendence reached the 2012 Black List. While the plot details for that movie are being kept under wraps, hiring an up-and-coming writer with a high profile, A-list sci-fi project solidly in development is a clear sign that Fox wants this sequel to go forward.

prometheus sequel cast Transcendence Writer Jack Paglen in Talks to Pen Prometheus 2

While we thought Prometheus was pretty excellent, with a host of deep, dark themes running through it which a summer blockbuster crowd usually is not expecting (exploring the nature of evolution, the cycle of destruction and creation, the unknowable nature of God), it definitely had its detractors. Damon Lindelof received a large share of the “blame,” given the immutable fact (pointed out by legendary screenwriter William Goldman) that when Americans go to the movies, they want answers to questions, not more questions. The movie’s wide-open ending and almost perfunctory attempt to connect it to the main through-line of the original Alien series left plenty of question marks.

One thing that was almost universally agreed upon: Ridley Scott’s sure-handed direction was the high point of Prometheus. It seems hard to believe, but that film was Scott’s first foray into science fiction since 1982′s Blade Runner. Scott’s return to the genre he helped define for an entire generation was a big selling point for Prometheus and the fact that he has yet to officially sign on as director of the sequel should give fans pause.

Still, it really does all start on the page. As we’ve pointed out, the filmmakers could’ve easily streamlined the connections between Prometheus and Alien, strengthening the potential for continuing the franchise, which had devolved into a series of uninspired alien-slasher flicks. Injecting some fresh blood into this project might prove to be the best bet, and with the talent drawn to Transcendence (director Pfister, stars Johnny Depp, Morgan Freeman and Kate Mara), Paglen might be the mind needed to close some of the gaps in the narrative.

Stay tuned for more details about Prometheus 2.

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Source: The Wrap

TAGS: prometheus

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  1. “…given the immutable fact that when Americans go to the movies, they want answers to questions, not more questions.”

    Therein likes your problem. So far, only Americans seem to be hating on Prometheus for that very reason alone while I loved it and Life Of Pi because they made you think about our origins, whether or not the Ancient Alien theory could be true and the true nature of the universe.

    US audiences seem to want to see explosions on top of explosions and anything intellectual is a turn off. It’s sad and I’m in no way tarring everyone with that brush, it’s just that the vocal minority of the world seem to shout the loudest and troll/flame/insult those who don’t agree with their opinions, making those who liked a great film or hated a horrible one feel awkward and silence themselves for fear of more abuse.

    • Leaving open ended questions and leaving audiences to reflect or question our origin and place in the universe is completely different from leaving PLOTHOLES! The reason why we don’t like this movie, and the reason why it’s so liked internationally is because most foreign markets haven’t seen the original Alien movies, we(The U.S.) have. And Prometheus has so many plot holes, that it doesn’t even bother to address. Go watch Alien and Aliens. And come back and tell me if Prometheus fits in that verse, because it doesn’t. It’s not a prequel or a sequel. Ridley Scott really dropped the ball on this one.

      • I think the original alien movies are pretty well known internationally.

        • +1

      • “and the reason why it’s so liked internationally is because most foreign markets haven’t seen the original Alien movies”

        Did you just pull that nugget if information from a rather smelly place? Because as someone who has lived, traveled around the world I have yet to meet anyone between 20-40 that has not seen aliens.

        I totally agree though that Prometheus has a lot of plotholes

        • I am from Amserica and I haven’t seen any of the Alien movies including Prometheus

          • Well, no wonder… it hasn’t been released in AMSERICA yet! :P

            How old are you? The first Alien movie was released in 1979, so there’s no excuse. Go stream/download/buy it.

          • Treat yourself. Watch the first two Alien movies..they are fantastic! Later ones were not quite up to par. And watch John Carpenter’s The Thing with Kurt Russell while you are at it; that one is pretty good as well if you like horror/sci-fi films that are a cut above the rest!

      • This is what happens when people don’t travel, they assume anything outside their country is backwards, typical xenophobia…also, Alien was filmed in London, and by a British Director, so that make it quite popular in the UK and Europe..

        • It’s not xenophobia, it is called ethnocentricity.

      • @”And come back and tell me if Prometheus fits in that verse, because it doesn’t. It’s not a prequel or a sequel. Ridley Scott really dropped the ball on this one.”

        That’s like complaining that Episode 1 didn’t explain how Anakin became Darth Vader. Prometheus was left open for a sequel for a reason…to continue the story. Besides, Ridley Scott and Damon Lindeloff have even said the movie wasn’t meant to be a direct sequel to Alien.

        • I can see what you mean with your comment, but when I look at Prometheus I have serious issues with a lot that happened in the movie. That Geologist alone drives me crazy. Here’s a guy who has awesome mapping capabilities with his “pups”, and yet he’s the guy who gets lost? Are you frickin’ kidding me? Then that whole thing where he’s folded up at the hatch of the landing vehicle. That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

          I give the film a pass when it comes to all of the Christian overtones written into a science fiction film. As an atheist it made me roll my eyes a bit, but I realize a large part of the population believes in at least some aspects of the Bible. I could have done without the injection of religion into it at all.

          The sets were amazing and the cinematography was top notch. I’m hoping that Paglen didn’t sleep through any of his science classes and is also acutely aware of what a plothole is in order to expunge all of them from his script by the second draft.

          And lets not even discuss the stupidity of the two ladies running the same direction as the rolling space ship. It’s like Lindelhof was writing for five-year olds.

      • “most foreign markets haven’t seen the original Alien movies”

        Best joke of the day. Good one!

        • What’s Alien? Actually hold on, what’s a movie?

          We are still getting our heads around fire over here in blighty and don’t get me started on the wheel!!

      • Hi Appa, you are making a fair amount of bald statements there. I think you’ll find that quite a lot of the rest of the world has seen all of the Alien films and also does appreciate soem ambiguity in a story. The two things are exclusive. Ridely Scott being a director from England I’m sure a large percentage of his fans over here in the UK would agree with me on that. PS have you seen Alien 3 and Alien Resurrection or perhaps Alien verus Predator or its sewuel as you fail to mention those in “all” the films you mention…

      • I’m not from north America but I can assure you that where I live, everybody knows the Alien films…

      • You are failing to remember that Prometheus is the first of a trilogy meant to lead into the Alien series…

        Its not done yet… a couple of things clicked, and im pretty sure more would have as well

      • A “plothole” I understand people might see is what appears to be unlikely behavior of some of the characters. But, being that ‘Prometheus’ was the first of 2 (and maybe 3) movies, those behaviors may be explained down the line. If you consider that the next movie(s) may explain all of your perceived “plotholes”, you may realize there were no “plotholes” to begin with.

    • yeah only Americans only like exlplosions and nothing intellectual, but Battleship the epitomy of that type of movie did great overseas but failed in the U.S. come on man don’t be a lame.

    • I enjoyed Prometheus and I’m an American… and I’m pretty sure the rest of the world is familiar with the Alien series Appa ali Apsa (see below).

      I loved the fact that it raised more questions than it answered. That means it is it’s own thing, and only slightly connected to the Alien movies. They never promised people anything specific about how it would be connected, fans just expected it to be a prequel. I didn’t watch it with the false expectations many people had, so I got to enjoy a very good movie instead.

      • If it pleases the court, I would like to defend myself now if I may.

        Lets begin.

        @dislocated pom:
        “as someone who has lived, traveled around the world I have yet to meet anyone between 20-40 that has not seen aliens.”
        –I suppose you’ve asked everyone that you’ve met if they’ve seen the Alien movies. Everyone uh? I completely buy that.

        @Mark:
        “This is what happens when people don’t travel, they assume anything outside their country is backwards, typical xenophobia”
        –How in the hell was anything that I said xenophobic? Because I said that a series of American movies, which were primarily made for an American (or Western) audience, which made the majority of its B.O. returns here in the states, weren’t widely exposed to an international audience? Because that’s not xenophobia, that’s B.O. fact, as I will show later in this post. And just so you know, I was born and raised outside the U.S. and just recently got my U.S. citizenship.

        @Ghost:
        “That’s like complaining that Episode 1 didn’t explain how Anakin became Darth Vader”
        –My gripe with this movie isn’t that it leaves a lot of open ended question, and room for a potential sequel. It’s that it leaves a lot of plot holes which it fails to address. I think you and most people misunderstand this. Leaving questions unanswered and leaving plot holes are to completely different things. Take David and the Engineers for example, the two main villains. The viewer is not expressly told the motivations (why they are doing what they are doing) of either of these characters, yet I consider one to be an unanswered question and the other to be a plot hole. The film makers purposely did not tell the viewers why the Engineers had decided to destroy the human race, because they felt it unnecessary. Ridley Scott could have put it in, but he chose not to. The Engineers are bad and that’s all you need to know. David on the other hand is a different story, in so much as he is a main character and in truth you cannot say for what reason he did anything throughout the story. Why does he poison Holloway? Is he angry at him? Is he simply curious? Did Weylend tell him to? Is David malfunctioning? Does he know something that no one else on the ship knows? There is no empirical evidence for any conclusion. But how is this any different from not knowing the motivations of the Engineers?Well in reality they are very similar because you don’t know why David is doing anything that he does. It makes you question everything that’s going on in any scene with which he is involved in. Normally when you have no idea why a character does the things he or she does it because the story is building a mystery around that character, and will have a payoff, usually explaining why the character did those things. In Prometheus, I think they attempted a mystery but forgot to include a payoff for all the due diligence of the audience members paying attention to all David’s weird actions. It’s like they needed a character to act nefarious and creep around the Engineer ship, but failed to give a reason for many of his actions. In the end, what makes the lack of motivation for David’s character a plot hole, is that it happens too many times and each time it happens you realize you’re not sure how to feel about this character. Are you supposed to feel bad for him? Or scared of him? Is he even a villain? And the worst part is that by the end of the film you realize there aren’t going to be any explanations.

        @TheLostWinchester:
        “Best joke of the day. Good one!”
        –Read my response to Mark.

        @Xandra:
        “PS have you seen Alien 3 and Alien Resurrection or perhaps Alien verus Predator or its sewuel as you fail to mention those in “all” the films you mention…”
        –I really didn’t like Alien 3 or 4, or any of the AvP movies. I felt like they destroyed both franchises with those movies. That’s mainly why I ignore them completely. In fact I only consider Alien, Aliens, and Prometheus to be in the Alien Universe/franchise.

        @Exodus:
        “I’m not from north America but I can assure you that where I live, everybody knows the Alien films…”
        –So you’ve asked literally everyone who lives in whichever region of the world you live in? Must be pretty small.

        @FILTHpig:
        “They never promised people anything specific about how it would be connected, fans just expected it to be a prequel”
        Ridley Scott flat out stated that Prometheus exists in the same Universe as Alien. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-18298709. Not only that, but the events of Prometheus happens before those of Aliens chronologically, so it’s safe to assume they meant this to be a prequel, but since it didn’t fit well, they just didn’t confirm it as such.

        Finally:
        I want to show everyone, what I meant by Alien/Aliens being more exposed here in the sates than in foreign markets.

        Total B.O. for Alien: $104,931,801. Domestic (U.S.) earnings=$80,931,801. Internationally= $24,000,000. It made more than 3 times as much here in the states than it did abroad.

        Total B.O. for Aliens:$131,060,248. Domestic gross= $85.1 million. Internationally=$45.9 million. It made almost twice as much here in the U.S. than it did abroad.
        Total B.O. for Prometheus:$403 million. Domestic=$126,477,084. Internationally= $276,877,385. It made more than twice as much money internationally than it did domestically, suggesting that Prometheus was bigger internationally than either Alien or Aliens. Numbers don’t lie. That’s why I said that the first two Alien movies weren’t as big internationally than Prometheus. And the B.O. returns support my statement.

        Sources:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alien_(film)#Sequels
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliens_(film)
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prometheus_(2012_film)

        I rest my case. I await your replies/apologies.

        • “I said that a series of American movies, which were primarily made for an American (or Western) audience, which made the majority of its B.O. returns here in the states, weren’t widely exposed to an international audience? Because that’s not xenophobia, that’s B.O. fact, as I will show later in this post.”

          Except that every bigh blockbuster from the US is not only being shown in cinemas but is also released on DVD and is shown on TV at least once a year in pretty much every so called “civilized” country in the world. So were Alien & Aliens. I’m from Germany and not only have I seen it multiple times on TV (I was too young to see in the theater), but I also own these movie on VHS, DVD and now Blu-ray. If the only place where people could see movies would be the theater your stats would actually mean something, but since that isn’t the case, not by a long shot, you are completely wrong.

          Oh,and as for “primarily the US market”. Have a look at the latest schedule of my local theater and tell me if some of this movies look familiar to you:

          http://www.uci-kinowelt.de/Bochum_Ruhr_Park/Programm

        • David’s motivations were simple….to find a way for Weyland to become immortal. He was simply trying to find a way for Weyland to become immortal. That’s when he dscovered the last Engineer and Weyland was hoping to find a way to be immortal by asking “him” (The Engineer).

        • Then it’s a case of misunderstanding on your part.

          I never thought it would be a direct prequel, probably because Scott himself said it would only take place in the same universe and share the same “DNA”.

          Sounds to me like Scott wanted this to be it’s own thing, and I don’t blame him. I liked it very much the way it was, as far as being loosely connected to the Alien movies, and I can’t wait for the next one.

          • @TheLostWinchester:
            “in pretty much every so called “civilized” country in the world”
            –I don’t get why you put ‘civilized’ in quotations, as I never used that word. Maybe you’re trying to imply something here. Regardless of your implications, my argument still holds weight. It’s undeniable that Alien and Aliens are one of the most popular sci fi movies of all time, but it’s also true that the height of most movies’ fame is usually right during and after it is released. Alien(s) is no different, and as you can see by the B.O. returns, it was more popular here in the U.S. than abroad. Even with Blu-Ray and DVD sales, because these movies weren’t as popular abroad, you cant expect the those sales to be that much greater.

            “Oh,and as for “primarily the US market”. Have a look at the latest schedule of my local theater and tell me if some of this movies look familiar to you”
            –I was referring to the 70s and 80s when the U.S. was probably one of the only, if not, the only big B.O. draws, as demonstrated by both Alien movies. Today it’s a whole different ball game, most big blockbusters our now released abroad before here in the States because there is a larger audience abroad, and more available markets than 30 years ago.

            @Ghost:
            “David’s motivations were simple….to find a way for Weyland to become immortal”
            –And that somehow explains everything that he does? Like putting the goo in Holloway’s drink?

            @FILTHpig:
            –Lets review the definition for prequel-a literary, dramatic, or filmic work whose story precedes that of a previous work, by focusing on events that occur before the original narrative (Wikipedia). Prometheus. Does it happen before Alien? Yes. Is it in the same Universe as Alien(s)? Yes. It is a prequel, done badly.

            • Everything I’ve read that Ridley Scott has said leads me to believe he intends to make at least 1 (and maybe 2) more movie(s) and that the sum would be more of prequel to the franchise than ‘Prometheus’ alone.

    • I’m an American that loved this movie. I actually enjoyed the fact that it was about questions, not answers. The movie, for me, screamed “this is where we’re at” in space faring philosophy and religious thought. I wouldn’t change a single frame of this masterpiece.

  2. I loved Prometheus. While I’m not big on pimping out other’s websites on threads (especially on screenrant) this guy pretty much explains that there are NO plotholes: ericversus.com

    • I cant find that link.

      • http://ericversus.com/blog

        • Nothing is really explained in that article, just one persons opinion/observations and allot of assumptions being made about the people who didn’t like it… typical.

          • He originally posted on his Facebook page as a response to a YouTube video stating all the problems with the movie. Not sure why he didn’t post the video onto the site as well.

    • Yo that blog is great, pimp worthy for sure. Just for his defense of Iron Man 3 alone it’s worth reading. And he hit the perfect note with Gangster Squad.

  3. The major problem with Prometheus was that it was sold to us here in the states as being the long awaited explanation to a great many question dealing with the “Aliens universe”. What we were sold was a prequel to Alien. What we got was a prequel to the prequel we were actually expecting… what we got was half a movie!

    • That’s actually the first intelligent & legitimate complaint I’ve heard.

      • +1

    • Very true but Prometheus was always gonna be at least two movies. from the start they talked about even filming them back to back.

    • Prometheus was NEVER sold as the “prequel to Alien”.

      At NO point in time did they ever announce it as “answering all the questions” about the alien universe. Only in your imagination, or in internet forums discussing what fans of Alien and Aliens would LIKE to see.

      Scott was always perfectly clear that the film was NOT a prequel to Alien. He said it repeatedly in interviews. The ONLY comment he ever made linking the Prometheus to Alien was that it would contain “some DNA”. And that turned out to be a great pun on part of the storyline.

      The reason American audiences hated Prometheus is because they want to be spoonfed answers when they watch a movie. That’s it. There are no plotholes. If you watch the movie, having taken your Ritalin if needed, and don’t spend 2 hours texting on your iPhone about it, then you will understand everything that happens, and the questions that are posed, and how it can set up the continuation of that story.

      • The whole idea of an “Alien Universe” that this movie was supposed to be tied to seems like an invention of some fans. Whatever has been done in the comic books and novels really has no bearing on any of these movies and the films themselves have all been separate entities with the alien creatures and a few other elements as the common thread.

      • +1

      • Wow… well said!

      • Said everything I would’ve said.

    • Trilogy Prequel!!!

      Theres two more movies to tie it all together

    • Really?! If that’s the case Ridley should take much greater control of his films marketing in future. Because EVERYTHING I read leading up to the Prometheus release from himself and the writers made it clear it WASN’T a prequel – that it was a different kind of film (to Alien) that was just set in the same universe.

      • That was in response to Your Mom…should have read Mikey and Slayer’s posts first! Well said both.

  4. Let’s not have plotholes this time?

    And I’m not asking for incredibly direct finality to the film either, just one that asks grand questions and intends to leave the audience with something besides MORE QUESTIONS and CONFUSION.

    • Please name some of the plotholes, please.

    • If you have such a problem with the DNA part, then you should have walked out 5 minutes into the film when they showed a spaceship.

  5. He originally posted on his Facebook page as a response to a YouTube video stating all the problems with the movie. Not sure why he didn’t post the video onto the site as well.

  6. Thats great news. Ridley Scott is an excerlent director and Prometheus added to his cache as one of the best sci-fi creators on film at the moment.

  7. As long as they keep Damien Lindeloff away from this movie it will be just fine, that guy, along with Orci and Kurtzman are collectively ruining movies for everyone!!

    They have produced some of the most poorly written movies in years, transformers, the island, cowboys and aliens! And don’t get me started on Star Trek into Darkness!! There was literally no writing involved, it was just a massive rip off of space seed and wrath of khan!!

    There should be a political movement for not having these guys involved in movies!

    • Dude…The Island rocked. What were you expecting? Shakespeare? These movies are comic-books writ large. That’s all. Understanding that simple point; “Independence Day” was a fun romp through a comic book on the silver screen. ( ‘m not specifically referring to you, Dr. Ken, here going forward now… )
      I still don’t get all the pseudo film critics who over-expect great writing from bashing movies that are made for fun. Even the ones that dare you to think are still comic books.

      Again, this is the perfect quote:

      ” If you have such a problem with the DNA part, then you should have walked out 5 minutes into the film when they showed a spaceship.”

      http://ericversus.com/blog/49-prometheus-is-a-perfect

  8. SPOILERS

    Guy with robots that create a map: “I’m leaving,but I’m going to get lost despite the fact I created the map of this place everyone else seems to know how to use.”

    I just wanted that answer spoonfed to me, then maybe I coulda’ liked the movie.

    • Easy. It’s a 3D map of a complex stucture that is easy to misread when you are in a hurry and perhaps even panicking. When highly trained pilots manage to get lost and fly into mountainsides despite modern navigational systems, moving maps and while being monitored by air traffic control, is it so hard to believe that a mediocre scientist-for-hire joining a billionaire’s goose chase gets lost even though he had a map? Let me answer it for you: no it isn’t hard to believe, nor is it impossible.

      • He was the geologist though. He called the little map robots his boys or dogs or something, and howled with confidence, and I felt like it was implyed or stated that he desgined those little mappers, but I might have just concockted that bit in my head for some reason.

        Eithier way, he wasn’t too panicked or flustered at the time of initally leaving, and can find his way back from where he was lost to the black goo room, but not the much shorter path out that everyone else could. Again, if he was the guy who got killed by the black snake I could see it, but he was the guy who literally made the map.

        He should have had a back up for losing it, or the ship should have contacted them and told them they were lost and directed them out sooner. He told them to leave due to the dust storm, so it stands to reason he could have helped direct them out in time as well.

        • Yes, Fifield (the geologist) was flustered. He actually said that he didn’t want to be there anymore, because the place gave him the creeps.

    • I agree that was a major plot hole. The deleted scenes on the DVD explain that they lost the map and that is how they get lost. A lot of the deleted scenes address a lot of the plot holes in the movie. It is not a perfect film but I enjoyed it.

      • A “plot hole” is a mistake in a script that undeniably unravels the inner logic of the story. Just because something isn’t explained completely and you have to fill in some blanks or because you refuse to accept a plausible (if unlikely) occurence it doesn’t mean it’s a plot hole.

        • +1

  9. Prometheus is garbage, don’t take some quote from some guy saying Americans want answers and that’s the reason we didn’t like it, what a BS blanket statement. Leaving an ending open with questions with a sequel set up has been going on for years with planned franchises. Prometheus was just not a good movie

    I’m American and I hated it because it was a crap fest filled with I unlikable, stupid characters and horrible storytelling. These were probably the dumbest scientists ever to leave earth on a spaceship.

    • I’ve been told by quite a few scientists that the characters in ‘Prometheus’ act very much like the scientists that are often chosen to go on important expeditions/research opportunities (know any “dumb” people doing very important work?). Turns out the characters behaviors/actions in the movie could be quite realistic for scientists.

      And who knows, the fact that they were “dumb” may be explained down the line. In other words, they were specifically chosen for this trip because they were “dumb”.

  10. What killed it for me was the *Spoiler* “Aliens creating humans by slicing their own DNA”.. This movie is a Biologist worst nightmare. If the movie presents itself as an intelligent and comprehending flick, then why must it result to StarWar-like fantasies, and farfetched sequences that looked like it was pulled out of a Scientology notepad?
    A Biologist would ask, “Well, where did the rest of Earth’s organisms come from in this Scottverse” –PLOTHOLE.
    That’s straight up ignoring Darwin’s fundamental rules of Evolution. (Well, evolution not strictly Darwin’s rules of life, but developed upon by other Biologist through the years).

    • Remember, Scott admits he doesn’t believe in evolution& is an agnostic; the film is pretty much his commentary on both evolution and the idea of God. It’s perfectly ok for people to not believe what YOU believe

    • It’s not an original idea and it has been explored in books and other films. And if you are watching a movie with aliens and spaceships one has to assume some level of suspension of disbelief.

  11. Scott did not want to make an Alien sequel he wants to make an Ancient Aliens/ Chariots of the Gods movie. So they shoehorned both films together which became the beautiful mess that is Prometheus. Go watch Comicbook girl19′s YouTube series and she does a great job explaining what happened with this film.

    I enjoyed the film, great cast, Fastbender was brilliant as the android but it is far from perfect. Lets see how the sequel turns out.

  12. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BWnTW4rL0U

    Explains it all…..Movie had so much promise but it fell short. I don’t want to have this Americans vs. other country debate. The main point is that when you tell a story you need to have map that has an ending. If you want that ending to be blurred that is fine. But this films story map was abandoned half way throughout its telling.

  13. The main problem with Prometheus, which I think is what people are really struggling with was Character Development. There were way too many decisions made by these characters that went against who they were. The story didn’t have a good sense of who the characters were, it was more the characters were placed in the story for stuff to happen to, instead of characters we could follow through a story. Elba’s Captain had more going on than the more central characters. He had a purpose, stayed true to his characters wants and needs, internal struggles, even a strong loyalty to his crew.

    • I am big fan of most of the Alien movies and the fact the characters often do a lot of things that seem dumb to move the plot along. After along time it finally dawned on me that in Aliens Ripley forgot that the alien that killed her crew was running around the air ducts, which was exactly how they got through the barricades in Aliens.

      As for character development apart from a bit of conversation with the crew in the first movie, most of the cast in all the movies are fodder for the aliens and are not overly developed characters. The problem for me with Prometheus was the predictable stereotypical things that were done. It was a given the creatures had to get out somehow, I just think the writing was not very clever in how they did it.

  14. I think the ones who hate this movie are the ones who didn’t catch the philisophical(spell check?) aspect of the film. Sure it wasn’t as great as Alien 1 and 2, those can’t be topped at this point. We already got 2 alien films afterwards which tried to focus on gore but epically failed. A “softer” approach as a return to the series felt a lot better and is the route that needs to be continued. Keep Scott as director and IMO Damon should return for the script as he was the one with a multi-movie plan and at this point, he is the one to finish what he started

  15. I was disappointed in Prometheus #1, but still bought the DVD…gotta have the whole collection (Alien stuff, Prometheus stuff, Predator stuff, etc.). I will buy Prometheus #2 as well. But I do hope they do a little better job with it, with more clarity and plot. I generally like ridley Scott’s stuff (a decent percentage of it, anyways). Hopefully he will be sure the next one is a little more up to par of greats like Alien #1 & #2 (yes, I know Cameron did #2).

  16. Saw Prometheus, very disappointed. Perfect example of Hollywood film making by committee and “fixing” something that wasn’t broken, that being the original Alien:Engineers script which was a great read and made perfect sense.

  17. I’ve watched Prometheus 3 times now and I have to admit that the more time passes the more I have problems with it.
    The biggest problems for me are that even though Scott decided at some point that he didn’t want to make a direct prequel they still used parts of the script that was intended to be just that.
    So now even if there are 2 more films, trying to connect the dots becomes a complete mess. Even if you consider the Alien ship that the crew of Prometheus found, how do you explain that another ship on another planet crashed in the exact same way from what seems like the exact same circumstances?
    This may seem like I’m nitpicking but even if it’s only little things when you add them all up it equals one big mess.
    Also, as I’ve said before I think Damon Lindelof is receiving to much of the blame. If you watch the 3hr behind the scenes footage or read any of the interviews Scott or Lindelof gave you’ll see and hear that most of those changes were made because Scott wanted them to.
    So after all is said and done I’m at the point where I’d rather a sequel wasn’t made and this series is left alone. Maybe they can come back in 15yrs or so and reboot the whole thing. I’d rather a fresh start.

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