Now that Breaking Bad has come to an end, some fans might be on the look-out for more stories about the complexities of manufacturing and distributing illegal narcotics. As that show proved, transporting drugs can take a lot of effort and organization, and as upcoming crime thriller movie Narco Sub is set to prove, sometimes the only way to go is underwater.

Tony Scott (Top Gun) was originally attached to direct Narco Sub, but the project was put on hold after the sad news came last summer that Scott had committed suicide. Now, over a year later, it seems that Twentieth Century Fox is once more making moves towards getting Narco Sub into production.

The Wrap reports that Doug Liman, who first made it big with the Vince Vaughn/Jon Favreau comedy Swingers in 1996 and who just finished production on action sci-fi Edge of Tomorrow, is in “early negotiations” to take the directing chair for Narco Sub. The film is being produced under Fox’s Genre Films banner by Aditya Sood and Scott Free.

As might be deduced from the name, the narco-sub is a narcotics submarine: a custom-built submersible that is used by South American cartels for the purposes of trafficking drugs between Colombia and Mexico, so that they might then be transported over land into the USA. The name of the movie offers more or less the only clue as to what it might be about, since the details are being kept tightly under wraps.

The aforementioned script was written by David Guggenheim, who also wrote crime thriller Safe House and the laughably transparent Taken rip-off Stolen, which starred Nicolas Cage as a man desperately trying to rescue his kidnapped daughter and… well, you know the story. Safe House is the better of the two movies (and is currently in line for a sequel), and was carried along well by its leads, Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. When Scott was attached to Narco Sub we speculated that Washington – a Scott regular – might end up on the posters, but it’s hard to guess with plot details so sparse.

Whether Liman gets the job or not, the casting will likely depend heavily on whether Narco Sub will be primarily about the cartel members or about the people trying to find them. If a submarine is involved then there’s potential for all sorts of things to go wrong with it, up to and including the characters getting stuck on the ocean bed with a massive shipment of cocaine, and claustrophobia can be a strong element in a thriller.

Would the combination of Guggenheim’s script and Liman’s directing be enough to get you into the theater for Narco Sub, or would you prefer to stay above water?

We’ll keep you updated on Narco Sub as the project develops.

Source: The Wrap