Ever since he adapted his stage play A Few Good Men into a screenplay for the 1992 military courtroom blockbuster starring Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson, Aaron Sorkin has become one of the most prominent voices in Hollywood drama. Whether it’s been through his TV creations The West Wing or The Newsroom, or his scripts for Steve Jobs or The Social Networkwhich earned him a Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar – Sorkin has earned his keep as one of the most dependable writers in Hollywood.

And while his TV comedy Sports Night or screenplay adaptation for the baseball-themed Sabermetrics film Moneyball seemed to take Sorkin the most out of his comfort zone, the filmmaker is intent on stretching his creative talents even further when he soon meets with the two most dominant forces in comics. Speaking with Comic Book at CinemaCon, Sorkin, in what should come as a big surprise to many, says that he’s being courted by both DC and Marvel:

“I happen to have meetings coming up with both DC and Marvel. I have to go into these meetings and tell them as respectfully as I can that I’ve never read a comic book. It’s not that I don’t like them. It’s just that I’ve never been exposed to one. So, I’m hoping that somewhere in their library is a comic book character that I’m gonna love and I’m gonna wanna go back and start reading from the first issue on.”

Spider Man and the US Flag in Homecoming Marvel & DC Are Meeting With Aaron Sorkin


Sorkin didn’t get specific about whether the discussions with DC or Marvel involves work somehow with their comic book libraries, or if his involvement would be tied to the DCEU or MCU. As a heralded scripter of film and television dialogue, and given the increasing output from both the DCEU and MCU in both venues, the latter seems to make the most sense.

Whether it be Warner Bros. with DC, or Disney, Columbia or Fox with Marvel, studios are all too aware the danger of material becoming too stale, especially if their productions lean too heavy on visual effects. Bringing a character-oriented screenwriter like Sorkin on-board to help translate stories from the character-oriented medium of comic books could make for a unique package.

Now, of course, if Sorkin pitches ideas like Bruce Wayne meeting with a president named Bartlet in the West Wing of the White House, or Peter Parker ditching his camera to go shoot video for a television newsroom, then DC and Marvel may have to quickly reconsider their ideas of adding the scribe to the mix.

Next: Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer #2 Breakdown

Source: Comic Book