With the help of filmmaker Martin Scorsese and Boardwalk Empire creator Terence Winter, rock-legend Mick Jagger may soon add television producer to his enviable list of accomplishments.

The project – which was conceived by Jagger – chronicles the late-1970s music world through the eyes of a drug-addled record executive, as rock, disco and the burgeoning hip-hop scene began to change the landscape of the industry – seemingly ready to embrace the encroaching ‘80s.

Jagger initially approached Disney and then Paramount with the concept as a feature film, before HBO colluded with Paramount to reconfigure the project into a television pilot. That was back in 2010 when the project was set to be titled History of Music, and focus on two friends’ 40-year relationship in the music industry.

After bringing Winter on to write the pilot’s script, it appears the original concept of the show has been scaled back considerably – from a multi-decade arc to a story more focused on the end of an era, and the birth of a new one.

Like the Emmy-winning collaboration of Scorsese and Winter on Boardwalk Empire, Winter will write and executive produce, while Scorsese will likely serve as executive producer and sit in the director’s chair for the pilot episode. Jagger, meanwhile, will also be an executive producer – while undoubtedly serving as an incredible resource of first-hand knowledge for Winter and the show’s other writers to utilize.

While Scorsese may be best known for his classic films like Taxi Driver, Raging Bull and Goodfellas, or more recent favorites like The Departed, Shutter Island, and the upcoming Hugo, he’s also managed to craft some fantastic documentaries in between films – many of which, like the 2008 Rolling Stones concert documentary Shine a Light, No Direction Home: Bob Dylan in 2005, and his latest, the HBO doc, George Harrison: Living in the Material World, have focused on musicians and the music industry.

Martin Scorsese and The Rolling Stones from 'Shine a Light'

Despite the incredible wealth of knowledge on-hand for the program, HBO may be keen on the idea because, like the 1960s and Mad Men, music industry dramas are quickly becoming the show du jour – and it would be so unlike HBO to not be on the cusp of television trends.

In addition to the Scorsese/Jagger program, HBO is also looking at creating a series based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel A Visit From the Goon Squad, by Jennifer Egan, whose characters are involved in the music industry. Meanwhile, rival pay-cable network Showtime is readying its own 1970s-era recording industry series with Vinyl – which, unlike the HBO series, aims to take a multi-faceted look at the decade’s music scene by focusing on everything from record execs and stars, to drug pushers and prostitutes.

With both shows apparently shooting for exactly the same demographic, the winner might come down to which network can score the better licensing deals for the inevitably great soundtracks. With Jagger onboard at HBO, the network may not have to worry about being first out the gate.

Expect more news from Screen Rant as information on this new series develops.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter , Hollywood.com