Director Zack Snyder and screenwriter David S. Goyer are rebooting the Superman franchise with Man of Steel, and their approach is based on the same theory that Goyer and producer/co-writer Christopher Nolan applied to Bruce Wayne in Batman Begins: to give the superhero contemporary relevance – and endear him to a new generation while recapturing the passion of nostalgic fans yearning to be wowed as they once were – you must bring more emotional realism to the proceedings (in addition to modern filmmaking style, not as a substitute).

Hence, the general aura of anticipation and excitement surrounding the first Man of Steel screening reactions and interviews that describe the movie as a mix of Chris Nolan’s grounded comic book world-building and meditative storytelling, infused with Snyder’s approach to spectacle and sense of cinematic wonder. As the new Kal-El/Clark Kent himself (Henry Cavill) has put it, Man of Steel aims to be a healthy medium between whiz-bang fun and “something introspective, that really provokes something inside.”

You get the seriousness and thematic weightiness found in Man of Steel with the trailers and the first official television promo – which you’ve surely noticed by now contains virtually nothing in the way of new footage (sorry to say) – but the film’s (supposed) massive scale and action remain a heavily-guarded secret until the main course is served.

The same goes for specific plot details, as you can see from the latest Man of Steel synopsis below:

A YOUNG BOY LEARNS THAT HE HAS EXTRAORDINARY POWERS AND IS NOT OF THIS EARTH. AS A YOUNG MAN, HE JOURNEYS TO DISCOVER WHERE HE CAME FROM AND WHAT HE WAS SENT HERE TO DO. BUT THE HERO IN HIM MUST EMERGE IF HE IS TO SAVE THE WORLD FROM ANNIHILATION AND BECOME THE SYMBOL OF HOPE FOR ALL MANKIND.

Both Man of Steel and Star Trek Into Darkness have climbed atop the towering pile of anticipated Summer 2013 blockbusters for similar reasons, having to do with their less-is-more marketing philosophies – which is refreshing in today’s film and television-selling marketplace – and their delicate balancing act of revisiting cherished properties in a respectful manner, but including enough innovation to prevent the series from retreading over-explored territory (which has been key to the success of Trek and Star Wars Episode VII director J.J. Abrams’ moie-making career, in particular).

The latest Star Trek installment has the advantage of Abrams’ successful franchise reboot as a lead-in, which is part of the reason why that movie avoided landing on Screen Rant’s ’10 Riskiest Box Office Bets of 2013′ – and Man of Steel did not, following after director Bryan Singer’s Superman Returns left many a person grumbling that Superman cannot work in our modern world (cinematically, that is) without a proper makeover.

Nonetheless, there’s enough working in favor of Snyder’s movie to suggest it won’t also land on this year’s ‘Most Disappointing’ list – and could wind up one of the best superhero adaptations (nay, tentpoles in general) in recent memory.

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Man of Steel is directed by Zack Snyder, from a script by David S. Goyer and screen story by Goyer and Christopher Nolan. It stars Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Antje Traue, Diane Lane, Kevin Costner, Laurence Fishburne, Russell Crowe, Ayelet Zurer, Christopher Meloni, Harry Lennix and Michael Kelly.

Look for Man of Steel in 2D and select 3D/IMAX theaters on June 14th, 2013.

Source: Warner Bros.