On the off-chance you decided to read this opening paragraph before watching any of the clips featured in this article – bear in mind, these are NSFW promos for an R-Rated, male stripper dramedy titled Magic Mike. If you get busted by your boss for pulling up videos where both Channing Tatum and Matthew McConaughey (among others) shake their rear ends at the camera, wearing nothing but thongs: it’s your own fault.

Moving on…

Magic Mike is poised to become the latest in a string of successful Tatum vehicles, which began with the romantic drama The Vow and carried on through with the suprisingly popular (and acclaimed) 21 Jump Street reboot. The former reunites Tatum with director Steven Soderbergh; that pair collaborated earlier this year on Haywire (Tatum played a supporting role there) and will join forces again next year, on the pharmacological drama/thriller, The Bitter Pill.

As was previously suggested by the international Magic Mike trailer – but is fully-illustrated with the red-band promo and TV spot for the film – Soderbergh’s latest “joint” isn’t shy or bashful about showing male strippers in action. Tatum’s own experience working in that industry (prior to his movie career) helped inform the Magic Mike screenplay, which was penned by the actor’s newfound producing partner Reid Carolin. The latter also composed “additional music” for The Vow, will produce Roland Emmerich’s White House Down (starring Tatum), and is working behind-the-scenes with Tatum on the impending Peter Pan revisionist flick, Neverland.

Channing Tatum leads a brigade of male strippers in 'Magic Mike'

Judging solely by the trailers, one might walk away with the impression that Magic Mike essentially boils down to “Showgirls with men,” minus the (in)famous camp value of that film. Of course, Soderbergh’s movies are known for being marketed as conventional, in terms of both story and style – when, historically, even his mainstream efforts have a tendency to be unique on both counts (see: the Ocean’s Eleven trilogy, Contagion).

One should also consider how Soderbergh has previously likened the tone and artistic design of Magic Mike to an ensemble dramedy made by the late, great Robert Altman (MASH, The Player, Gosford Park). That gives all the more reason to expect more from Soderbergh’s new project than just a standard drama about a performer (Tatum) who is admired by his peers – and has all the fame, money, and attention he could possibly want – but is (say it with us) looking for something more.

Magic Mike opens in theaters around the U.S. on June 29th, 2012.

Source: Digital Spy