Legendary Entertainment’s Dracula Untold – a film that marks the beginning of Universal’s rebooted Shared Monsters Movie Universe – releases in theaters in the U.S. today, and earlier this week we learned the studio’s television division is developing a TV series based on the Myst computer game series. Today, we have a fresh report that reveals another one of Legendary TV’s in-development projects – a reboot of the cult 1960s sci-fi TV series, Lost in Space.

The original Lost in Space TV show aired from 1965-68 and followed the Robinsons, a family of space explorers – living in the then distant future of 1997 – who set out to establish a human colony on another planet after Earth becomes overpopulated, but wind up way off-course thanks to interference from a spy-turned accidental stowaway. A critically-derided movie adaptation of the property was released in 1998 and over the years since then, there have been a couple of failed attempts to revive the Lost in Space brand (including a TV show reboot pilot that John Woo was recruited to direct in the early 2000s).

Deadline is reporting that Legendary is now pushing to resurrect Lost in Space for the 21st century, with Kevin Burns (who owns the rights to the original series) onboard as an executive producer for Synthesis Entertainment, and Dracula Untold screenwriters Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless onboard to script the pilot. That makes Lost in Space the latest instance of Legendary reuniting with a past collaborator (or, in this case, collaborators), with the studio having also hired Godzilla writer Max Borenstein to pen both the Godzilla sequel and the upcoming King Kong origins film Skull Island, and re-teamed with Guillermo del Toro for next year’s haunted house feature Crimson Peak and the upcoming Pacific Rim 2.

dracula untold luke evans poster Lost in Space TV Show Reboot in the Works by Dracula Untold Writers


Dracula Untold is the first produced script from Sazama and Sharpless, though the duo also have the mythological adventure Gods of Egypt arriving in early 2016. So far the overall critical reception for Dracula Untold has fallen on the mixed-to-weak side (read our review), with its screenwriters getting points for having put together a decent, if unremarkable, genre film story. Certain writers are better fits for television than big screen entertainment (and vice versa), so we’ll just have to wait and see which is the case for the Lost in Space reboot team.

It would be nice if the series turned out well; not necessarily because it’s Lost in Space, mind, but because there’s a bit of a dearth of great space adventure TV series on the air right now. After all, until further notice Star Trek is going to remain alive on the big screen only; meanwhile, the developing reboots of properties such as Babylon 5 and Batlestar Galactica are intended for theatrical release, unlike Lost in Space.

We’ll keep you up to speed on the Lost in Space TV show reboot’s development.

Source: Deadline