‘Kick-Ass 2′: Why Controversial Comic Book Scene Was Changed for the Movie

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Christopher Mintz Plasse as The Motherfcker in Kick Ass 2 Kick Ass 2: Why Controversial Comic Book Scene Was Changed for the Movie

The world of Kick-Ass has always been trademarked by its raunchy and violent twist on the DC/Marvel superhero universes, but readers of Mark Millar and John Romita, Jr.’s Kick-Ass 2 sequel series know that one moment in particular from the comics earned the infamous distinction of being particularly repellent and controversial

When production started on the Kick-Ass 2 movie, there was a lot of curiosity about how writer/director Jeff Wadlow would tackle that dark moment from the comics. Having seen the movie now, we were sure to ask Wadlow about the challenge of adapting  Mark Millar’s no-holds-barred source material, and why he chose to handle this particular controversial scene the way that he did in the film.

[WARNING: MAJOR KICK-ASS 2 SPOILERS FOLLOW!]

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Kick Ass 2 Controversy 570x293 Kick Ass 2: Why Controversial Comic Book Scene Was Changed for the Movie

The scene in question from the comic books occurs when Chris D’Amico (under his new guise as The Motherf*cker) attacks the suburban neighborhood of Dave Lizewski/Kick-Ass’ love interest, Katie Deauxma, massacres her father, and subjects the poor girl to a gruesome gang rape by his squad of evil thugs. In the film version, however, Katie has been replaced by Kick-Ass’ crime-fighting comrade “Night Bitch” as the prominent love interest that The Motherf*cker assaults – and instead of a violent rape, we get a violent attempted rape that peters out (no pun) when The Motherf*cker fails to… “rise to the occasion.”

It was an interesting reversal of Millar and Romita Jr.’s comic and a scene that played well with audiences (at least judging from the theater I was in). When talking to Christopher Mintz-Plasse and writer/director Jeff Wadlow, I had to pick their brains about why it was necessary to change the controversial rape scene – and then, why it was changed to the comedic moment we got in the film:

Christopher Mintz-Plasse: I love really, really dark things like if there’s a rape scene it’s gotta be a dark movie it can’t be—I just didn’t think it would fit for this movie cause you’re watching it and it’s so colorful and fun and violent and you’re laughing, you’re getting excited and I don’t think a rape scene fits that vibe. In the comic—Jeff sets it right—in the comic they are not real people so you can put a rape in there and you’re not like feeling emotion towards it it’s just people on a piece of paper. But in a movie when you have real tangible people playing these parts it gets deep and it gets heavier on a bigger scale. I just don’t think a rape scene was needed. You know in the movie “Irreversible”—have you ever seen that?

I have – not that I particularly like to recall that I have. If you’ve seen the movie, you’ll know why; if you haven’t seen it, read about it HERE.

Christopher Mintz-Plasse: How crazy is that [movie]? But that movie CAN have a rape scene cause it’s so fucking twisted and dark; a movie like ‘Kick-Ass 2′… I just don’t think a rape scene was needed.

Kick Ass 2 Comic Book Rape Scene Kick Ass 2: Why Controversial Comic Book Scene Was Changed for the Movie

Wadlow was quick to highlight the vast differences between the comic book and movie mediums, and why what works in one, may not work in the other:

Jeff Wadlow: Well Mark is very smart about writing comic books and he understands that to get people’s attention you gotta push boundaries but that’s a very different medium than the film medium. He said early on, ‘we all know the movies that adapt to comics slavishly and don’t make any changes and are so beholden to the material that the movie suffers as a result.’ And I don’t need to name any names I’m sure you know which ones I’m thinking of. He said, ‘don’t make that movie, if you gotta change stuff, change it to make the best movie you could make.’

I understand what Mark was going for in that scene. I felt as a filmmaker – because I’m dealing with real people, not drawings of people – the audience didn’t need to be taken that far to experience the same kind of feeling. And also Chris, as far as the three leads go, Chris Mintz-Plasse, his characterization of Chris D’Amico is probably the most different from Chris in the comic. When you compare Dave in the comic to Aaron’s Dave or Chloe’s Mindy, [Chris] has probably moved the character the furthest away from the source material. So I wanted to create a scene there that was true to what Mark is trying to do in the comic, but also acknowledge that our Chris is slightly different than Chris in the comic and the audience doesn’t need to be taken that far to have the same emotional response.

The change in approach that the filmmakers were clear to distinguish early on, as Mintz-Plasse told us in an interview a year before Kick-Ass 2‘s release that the rape scene would indeed be getting an alteration: “The rape scene is not in it. There’s a version of it but there’s no rape. Thank God.”

Kick Ass 2 Motherf er Poster Kick Ass 2: Why Controversial Comic Book Scene Was Changed for the Movie

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It’s certainly understandable why the task of crafting a film that appeals to the masses (even as a violent, swear word-filled fantasy) would stop short of the rape line. The scene – as depicted in the comics – is truly something heinous, and the resonance amongst a filmgoing crowd watching a real live woman being gang-raped would definitely set a new standard for cinematic controversy – especially a movie that already has a sixteen-year-old girl cursing like a drunk sailor.

Are you happy that the rape scene was changed for the film? Or were you hoping that the filmmakers went the whole nine yards with Millar’s controversial source material?

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Kick-Ass 2 is now in theaters (and comic book store shelves) everywhere.

Be sure to check out our additional coverage of the film.

‘Kick-Ass 2′ Comic Book Artwork is property of Marvel Comics

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TAGS: kick ass, kick ass 2

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  1. I haven’t seen the movie or read the comic book, so this is just a general comment about rape scenes in general. It sounds to me like this scene is still an act of sexual violence and humiliation against a character, even if they didn’t go all the way and have actual penetration. So, if you think your movie is about being “so colorful and fun and violent and you’re laughing,” then even this tiptoeing up to the line of penetrative rape is going to be going too far for a lot of viewers. This is still going to make a lot of viewers uncomfortable. It’s still triggering. It’s still a rape scene. Pretending like it’s not is just being clueless, in my opinion.

    • Trust me, the only one humiliated is The Motherf**ker. It would be horrendous if it wasn’t for Christopher Mintz-Plasse’s careful balance of evil villain and hilarious stupidity. At times, he is bad and at others, he’s just an incompetent, immature young man. I wasn’t sure why the director and producers said Chris was so great in Kick-Ass 1, but he really sold it in this film.

      • But all it turned to was a stupid masturbation joke. Kick-Ass has a better quality of humour to draw from than that. This film doesn’t need class necessarily, but it was certainly below the belt. See what I did there ;)

        • It wasn’t a masturbation joke. The masturbation was an attempt to avoid the erectile dysfunction joke. I thought it was much funnier than the ‘sick stick.’

  2. Im with buster, even the scene implimented in its place while better still sounds uncomfortable. Especially involving someone so odd and not frightening as mintz-platz or w/e his name
    Is. Whats almost as bad as gang rape? Using a gang rape as a platform for a poor “cant get it up” joke.

    • Have to agree with yourself and Buster although I have to admit that the most uncomfortable rape scene I’ve seen in cinema was at the start of Baise Moi.

      Thing is, Baise Moi used it in context with the tale of two women who use it to get revenge against all men while the use of it (or the implied use in the movie version) in Kick-Ass 2 is purely there because it seems Millar just couldn’t help himself.

      The guy has written some good stories and some absolute garbage and even if you like the Kick-Ass comic books, you have to admit that the gang rape part is an example of his absolute garbage.

      Then again, I was uncomfortable during the consensual sex scene in the first movie because again, it just seemed to be there for the hell of it rather than actually having a point to it.

    • Sure, because then the near-gang rape of a female character is treated as merely the set-up for a punchline. It’s the equivalent of “Knock, knock, who’s there?” It’s really a plot device that ought to be handled with more thoughtfulness than that if you’re going to use it all in a film that’s supposed to be summer fun.

      • I feel like you’re forgetting the important part.
        It was in the comic. To remove it completely might have bothered of a lot of the fan-base, considering many knew exactly what was coming. They may not wish to see it, but they expect it, and removing it completely diverges from the storyline too much.
        I think they did a masterful job of keeping it within the bounds of acceptable, while not removing a key “darkness” from the film that is a dark comic book adaptation.

        • I did say up top I haven’t seen the film or read the comic book. I’m just commenting on the notion that the filmmakers dealt with what they obviously perceived to be the tonal problem of inserting a rape scene into a film of this nature by not cutting the scene altogether but rather by including the scene and substituting a joke for penetration. It’s sounds to me like it’s still a rape scene and thus it sounds to me like the tonal problem is still going to exist for viewers who are sensitive to scenes of sexual violence.

          But, again, I concede that I’m going on the filmmakers’ statements here.

  3. hell yes millar crossed the line with that in the books i stopped reading there cause he was just trying to get a rise out of his readers there is o reason for the rape n the book and millar knows that he was just going for shock value it gave nothing back to the story and it was sick so yes iam glad that its changed for the movie

    • I disagree actually. Whilst Millar WAS going for shock, definitely, it fit the story completely. The Kick-Ass series exists to suggest what would happen if someone in the real world decided to become a superhero.

      What do you think would really happen if someone became a supervillain? I think, as sick as it is, they would definitely go around massacring children and raping people. It is exactly what someone who is pure evil would do.

      • in honesty its millar going all out to shock his readers and one thing most supervillains even in real life wouldnt say “lets see what evil dick tastes like” its garbage line and scene written by a guy who was trying to one up his previous work to make it more “SHOCKING”.

        • Well obviously the dialogue is going to be heightened because it’s a comic book. He’s taking the work where it logically would go if a real life supervillain exists. To suggest that any depiction of rape in fiction is designed solely to shock is to underestimate the talents of writers.

          • You’re right. Any depiction of rape in fiction isn’t. But all of Mark Millar’s are. I say ALL because he’s included rape in all but two or three of his comics, for a total of over 25 instances. They’re over-the-top, sensationalized, and incredibly misogynistic/anti-female. He’s said that “rape is no different than decapitation.” Anyone who seriously believes that has never known a rape victim in their life.

            If he thinks rape is such a great plot device, why don’t his main male characters get raped more? Why is it always women? If he really wanted to make readers uncomfortable with a villain’s actions, he’d pull some Deliverance.

  4. Well I don’t agree with even the attempted rape scene, but at least it’s not the actual rape scene. Rape is pure evil and anybody that enjoys watching a rape scene —well no comment on that. As far as the movie irreversible goes haven’t seen it and don’t want to either.

    • I want to watch it, not because of the scene hinted at in this article but because the movie has always seemed to be one of those great, little known pieces.

      Trying to get my hands on Tokyo Gore Police and Grave Encounters 2 because the first movies in those series were better than a lot of big time Hollywood productions of the past 5 years.

    • Agreed. If anyone is going to miss that scene they should spend some time in prison and get back to us. The 2009 extended version of The Last House on the Left had such a such a scene and I had to leave the room. Strangely my wife, who rented it, was able to sit though it.

    • It’s funny to say this when the entertainment industry is drenched in the blood of dead characters.

  5. I remember thinking “well that wasn’t needed at all” when I first read that scene. I mean, attacking the neighborhood and all was in line with what the character had become, but the rape was clearly thrown in for shock. I’m glad they at least partially removed it for the movie. Though it sucks we don’t get the rumble in Times Square at the end, at least from what I’ve seen in the trailers.

    • They merely substitute the location. The fight is still in place.

    • lol So people aren’t capable of rape no matter how evil they are and it’s only for shock value. What kind of world are living in?

  6. So we’re willing to show insane amounts of physical violence and gore and play it off as funny as well sometimes, but when it come to sexual violence we’re suddenly subversive eh?

    • Yeah, CM-P’s characterization of “fun and violent” as opposed to using the framing of, say, “fun and action-packed” is sort of tin-eared. The PG-13 rating really has broken down a bit in terms of the amount of violence and mayhem that are allowed as long as you don’t show the consequences of the violence and mayhem. I mean, I loved FURIOUS 6, but there’s a couple sequences of mass death in there that seemed problematic in terms of how little weight they’re given in the narrative.

    • Cody, I posted the exact same thing before I saw your comment. It seems fairly hypocritical to me.

      • Yeah I actually loved the violence(not knocking it, its what kickass is about) just saying its hypocritical, as well especially when its what happens in the book and otherwise….what was the point in motherf*cker going to her house with his minions(killing several cops).
        Later we see her in a hospital bed not looking terribly bad(as compared to colonel star/stripes) and she just gets better for the final battle.
        Im not saying you need an extended rap’e scene(I think its only implied in the comic) but the film doesnt acknowledge it at all.

        I just think the darkness and vileness of the act wouldve added more to kickass’ personal motivation to take down chris along with his dads death.

        Also they glorify every time kickass gets lucky(with katy in the first and nightb*tch in the second) and show tidbits, but when s3x is bad and wrong, then lets just tell a joke and cut away.

  7. I’ve personally never been able to stomach a rape scene in any movie ever. He one in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was especially uncomfortable, it honestly took me 10 to 15 minutes to get through the scene.

    • Well at least in that scene she gets some payback with the tattoo. Not saying I found it easy to sit through the rape or anything, but it was nice to see the guy get punished in the way that he did.

    • After that scene, it’s a very comforting movie. But I can easily see why no one would watch further than that.

  8. The Gang Rape in the comic was off panel, and was not depicted graphically. Just the aftermath.

    In Comics, there is no place for sexual assaults.

    Anyone who has a problem with the alleged rape scene in Kick Ass 2, then you better not watch The Accuse.

    There is no place in my opinion for a gratuitous rape scene, unless it an integral part of the story. Even then, I do not pay attention.

  9. They left the one from Watchmen in, so whats the difference with this one

    • You see, you have to REALLY understand Watchmen to know that’s really not, technically, a rape seen. Eddie knew that violence turned her on. And it did. It’s hard to get that just from her smile in the movie, I admit. You have to have a good understanding of the story and the source material to realize she really isn’t being raped, and even if she is… she is enjoying every second.

      She didn’t go back to him and get pregnant with his kid because she didn’t like what he did. What he did “hit the spot” so to speak.

      • What? where the hell did you get the idea that she was turned on by being raped???

        The reasons she went back to him were not explained well enough or alluded to properly in Watchmen in a way that seemed legitimate.

        However in before watchmen (the minutemen segment) a more in depth view of how it happened was given and as a result the events of the g-novel regarding that incident made a bit more sense. But there getting back together had NOTHING to do with her loving getting raped. :/

        • Dr. Mindbender is insane. SPOILERS: Silk Spectre did not in any way enjoy being raped, and the rough s3x stopped being enjoyable as soon as she realized that ‘no’ meant something other than ‘no’ to her compatriot. But the writing is excellent, and over the years she realized a couple of things (with the power of denial?), such as a) the end result made the horrible event worthwhile to her and b) she was capable of forgiving her sick attacker to a certain point.

          As horrific as rape is, is it really worse than ending a human being’s life violently? There are rape survivors. Are there decapitation survivors? I also felt that the drama of the supervillain attack was blunted by the cop-out. I didn’t mind that they cut away to the impotence joke, but the ominous music stops and they make it seem like Night Biatch was just going to get a spanking. Really, MF’s impotence should have enraged him MORE and put her in a much more scary situation where her short-lived respite would turn into greater physical punishment. Anything less and she gets off light compared to the Colonel, which makes zero dramatic sense since she is personally closer to the man that the MFer hates. She should have been incoherent and broken in that hospital bed.

  10. I can’t watch any rape scene in a movie period.

    • I have, in many movies.

      Hate the idea of rape and find watching rape scenes uncomfortable but after seeing the original I Spit On Your Grave, most other things are a cakewalk.

    • @War Clown

      That’s your problem. I don’t see how this should affect normal people.

    • It wasn’t shown in the comic anyway.

  11. My guess is they left that part out to keep their rating & not losing out on the young teen audience. Rape scenes in films are a touchy subject & even if done with a deft hand they can totally turn some people off to a film.

    • How would they lose their rating? It’s rated R anyway.

      • @Corey

        It would down to NC-17. That is how they would lose their rating.

        • If it were portrayed in the same way as the comic I doubt it gets a NC-17 over it…really I don’t care if it is in there one way or another but I don’t think a scene were a gang rape occurs off screen would push a movie over the R rated edge.

          • I never read the comic, but the way it has been talked about I assumed it was a long, drawn-out visual situation. Having it implied would mean there is no scene per say, so it was probably left out to avoid bad press.

            • Nope, pretty much it was Mother F—KER unzipping his pants and the aftermath of the attack.

  12. No need for it–glad they removed it as written. Let’s keep the focus on ass-kicking please. ;)

  13. So let me get this straight. NUMEROUS violent deaths in various ways are more acceptable that a faux rape scene?

    • There’s a (perfectly reasonable) stigma attached to sexual violence that isn’t attached to scenes of murder. Way more people are raped than murdered, so it feels real to a huge number of people.

      Also, murder doesn’t traumatise the individual for the rest of their lives (they’re dead), but rape does.

      • That is clearly a backwards rationalization. If you asked 99% of women or men raped would say they would rather be raped than murdered.

        Secondly, the traumatization based upon murder extends also to the family of the murdered victims.

        It is simply the socialized acceptance of one form of violence which has a ‘final’ ending versus one that does not and it is hypocritical.

        So we can essentially watch hyper-violence and hyper-sexualization but when it comes to violent sexualization we get moral? Freeking ludicrous.

        • This isn’t really a discussion of hyper-sexualization or objectification in film, but there are plenty of viewers who are bothered by such things, as evidenced by objections to the gratuitous Alice Eve underwear shot in STAR TREK: INTO DARKNESS. So it’s not like that isn’t an issue for people.

          On the topic of this thread, though, sexual violence is something that a sizable part of the audience has experienced personally. The threat of sexual violence is something that an even larger part of the audience lives with daily. So it’s reasonable to assume that scenes of sexual violence or even the threat of sexual violence will trigger responses in a sizable portion of the the audience and filmmakers need to be sensitive to the possibility of creating emotional responses that are contrary to their intentions, which are apparently, in this case, to make a film that’s colorful and fun and funny. If they want to avoid those unwanted responses (and the comments in the post suggests that the filmmakers here did), it’s not enough to feature a scene in which rape all-but-happens and pretend like that’s enough to sidestep the issue.

          • Buster, that is my point about social hypocrisy. You are making a market driven argument that ‘people are uncomfortable so it shouldn’t be shown or it shouldn’t be shown in detail’. I just watched a regular high grossing rated R movie where a helicopter blade sheared off a mans head and they showed it piece by piece.

            As far as the fear of violence or sexual violence, where I come from many people fear violence period. This is also common in other parts of the world. Point being using that as a greater justification for steering away from rape does not hold weight.

            Now I can buy the market based response since movies are based upon their success at the box office at that scale. However the moral arguments against sexual violence but the blatant endorsement of MURDER DEATH KILL is hypocrisy at its finest.

            • Love how “uhm yeah” is completely correct, while Tom and Buster are just politically correct. It’s a disgrace to see people whiteknighting like that.

    • Depends. Violence between combative characters is one thing (IE villains and the “superheroes” that take the accepted risks that come with fighting them). However violence against an unarmed person, particularly a women, is much worse.

  14. “in the comic they are not real people so you can put a rape in there and you’re not like feeling emotion towards it it’s just people on a piece of paper”

    I like Mintz Plasse but this statement is such b*******.

  15. Alright, so how many of you here had a problem with the near rape scene in Watchmen?

    • Near rape ._. ? She got pregnant from that didn’t she xD ?

    • I think what people have a problem with isn’t the depiction of rape, but the context of it. In the comic, Millar has said that he specifically included it in order to let the reader know that The Motherf**ker is a bad guy, which… well if the only way a writer can do that is to have a character rape someone, then their writing could probably use some work.

      The other problem is that Katie isn’t really treated as important, despite the fact that she’s the one being raped. The scene is used to make Kick-Ass angry, and to show that The Motherf**ker isn’t a nice person. Katie just sort of gets discarded once she’s served her purpose for the male characters in the plot.

      Compare that to Watchmen, where Moore shows the impact of the violence not only on the original Silk Spectre but also on Laurie, and shows the continued trauma of it in those characters even decades later. You could probably still criticise the way Moore handles it, but at least he treats it as more than just a clumsy shorthand for showing that the Comedian isn’t a very nice person.

      • Well clearly the writers did something right since there has been all of this talk generated by what amounts to an unseen act, that from what you wrote was done just to set something else up. The shock value tactic used in the comic would have probably backfired on them in the film which might be why they backed off. Clearly artistic integrity was not a factor and I doubt they would have fought to keep it in the movie.

  16. I think maybe this just highlights how borderline enjoying violence as entertainment is. You can beat a hooker and steal her money in any of the GTA video games, but as far as I know no video game would allow you to rape another character. So beating the hooker is okay because the sex was consensual and the beating came after.

    I personally avoid rape scenes as I find them upsetting. I still think it’s kind of hypocritical to say the movie or comic book is going too far.

    • Just the US has a problem with sex that badly and so few problems with on-screen violence. In the rest of the world no one cares about the sex parts, we are more disturbed by the violence. And that’s actually the way it should be. Sex is something normal, while violence definitely shouldn’t be so casual.

  17. I don’t get some sick satisfaction out of seeing a rape on screen, but it doesn’t bother me anymore than seeing someone dismembered or brutalized in other ways. If it has a function in the story it doesn’t bother me…if you just make a film with a rape scene just for the hell of it it is another story. That might lead me to believe that the writer or filmmaker has a strange hatred of women.

    • I’m with you. I don’t have a problem with rape scenes if they are relevant to the story and dealt with properly.

      • i would suggest to u guys to watch “a serbian film” and then come back and say that showing rape and everything of that sort in graphic nature is alrite to give to the mass public there will always be niche genres where people will get there jollies from watching people getting raped but in the whole 90% of the world is uncomfortable with it and it just shouldnt be depicted in any way like that in a main stream film that gets theatrical release people need to be more sensitive to the realities of the world before they make something so uncomfortable for so many people

        • I have seen A Serbian Film and it bares no relevance to my last comment. I suggest reading it before responding.

        • I do understand what you’re saying there, trip, but the director would argue that the realities of the world are precisely what he was trying to depict: http://aserbianfilm.co.uk/statement.html

  18. Total sellout to neo-feminist Left. Tell the story as written. Or don’t tell it at all.

  19. Mintz-Plasse’s ludicrous “just people on a piece of paper” babble notwithstanding, by its end, the first Kick-Ass movie adaptation had diverged so far from the tone of the original comic that the two had become separate entities. Gratuitous schoolgirl outfit and all. There was never the slightest chance of that scene making it into the sequel, implied offscreen or otherwise. The only question now is how exactly does what’s apparently been substituted for it fit into a “colorful and fun” movie?

  20. Not exactly on topic but Chris Mintz Plasse is such a terrible actor. He was great as McLovin, but he was so awful in the first KA. Seriously how does this guy get work??

  21. I enjoyed this movie. Dont really know why its called kick-Ass and not hit girl, but overall, pretty good movie. Jim Carrey was pretty good despite his rants about guns

  22. I’m glad that they left that scene out of the movie it just wouldn’t feel right

    • Wouldn’t feel right for _you_ you mean…

    • There is no scene, actually. It’s just the picture above, than cut away to, I think, the hospital calling Dave that she has been raped.

      • This sums up my thoughts exactly. Idiots who wrote this don’t realise that their was no ‘rape scene’ in the comic. It was implied because we see MF unzipping his trousers. We then hear later about it via a phone call.

        People on here really need to toughen the hell up – this is a 15 rated movie that shy’s away from rape – but showed a 15 year old girl orgasm and showed someone being stabbed with pieces of glass?

        I’m more offended by the fact they turned it into a joke – they should have just have him walk up, unzip and then we cut to the hospital as Dave enters finding NB showing the aftermath of the attack.

        Thus we also have a moral that rape is not a joke or something to be taken lightly – instead we had a “he’s limp so he cant rape her” joke.

  23. We just came back from seeing this and the “Rape” scene played out very funny.
    They did a great job putting the twist on the scene.
    They also left out another violent act from the comic dealing with Jim Carrey’s character.

  24. So instead of having a humiliating rape scene with the female character, they now have a attempted rape scene that humiliates the male character. Just because that’s politically correct/acceptable. That movie sounds p*ssy-whipped beyond recognition. Good job feminism.

    And it’s kind of disgusting to read the comments on this page saying “omg, you can’t even have attempted rape, omg so evul”. A man got shot off a balcony with a rocket and exploded into a million pieces in the last movie. If that can happen, so can rape.

  25. Maybe you should all see the movie before commenting on the scene. It was handled not only in a non-disturbing way, it was handled in a funny and ludicrous way. You couldn’t watch that scene and find it disturbing on any level because of how stupid it was.

    • ” It was handled not only in a non-disturbing way, it was handled in a funny and ludicrous way. You couldn’t watch that scene and find it disturbing on any level because of how stupid it was.”

      That is exactly the problem I have with the change they made. Why is gang-rape funny just because it failed? Millar is being accused of writing the scene for shock value, but at least there was tried-and-true real motivation for the victim’s boyfriend to get revenge. Meanwhile the movie makes light of the issue which seems worse, as we can now apparently laugh at rapists just like we laugh at Freddy Krueger.

      I did like the change of victim from Katie to Night Biatch. I just think they could have gotten even more mileage out of the situation. Consider, in Kill Bill a woman gets shot in the head which puts her into a coma and she loses her husband and believes that she has miscarried. This is psychologically traumatizing stuff and we get to enjoy her kicking serious tale in recompense. Therefore, if Night Biatch had gotten raped or dehumanized in some way then it would have been similarly empowering to show her destroying bad guys at the end of the movie. Instead she’s just one of the crowd at the end with no special motivation, symbolism, redemption, etc. She could have been a 3D character and instead stayed flat and was relegated to the background for the final act. I posit that yet another Hollywood female character got raped of her potential by the filmmakers.

      • “Why is gang-rape funny just because it failed?”

        There’s something called BLACK HUMOR.

  26. He means they aren’t physical, live-action people. If it’s a comic, it’s arguably less disturbing than seeing it acted out with real, live people rather than reading a comic.

    • And he’s still wrong. When I read books, the events are often much more horrifying because my imagination can bring them to life to a higher degree as opposed to watching actors. Like, when I saw Jaws at age 4 and a kid on a raft got attacked, my parents were worried that I would be upset, but I kind of figured that the movie people put red food dye into the water. No biggie. A few years later I read the novel, and within the first few pages a female corpse washes up on the beach and the author graphically describes how a certain body part of hers was deflated. Which would McLovin suppose I found more disturbing?

  27. I think people may forget the rape scene from The Accused starring Jody Foster. That was a brutal gang rape and it fit the film because of the serious subject matter.

    A brutal gang rape in the middle of Kick-Ass 2 would just suck the fun out of the film. Sure, Cage’s burning in the first one was severe, but a full on rape would just crash the film I think.

    • You forget – in the comics the rape was heavily implied (But not shown)

      It doesn’t need to be shown to be implied and having MF just go up to NB and say the line as you hear an unzipping sound and dramatic music – then cutting to the hospital and seeing NB beaten up and bruised would have made it feel a lot more true to the comic and be a lot more honest to the brutality of rape.

  28. It worked without it and could have worked with it.The movie promotes what would happen if super heroes and villains really existed. So naturally, along with everything else, murder, sex, drugs, rape, etc. All can be applied to the film without really hurting the overall tone of the story.

  29. I saw the movie yesterday and not having read the comic going into the movie was a little surprised by the scene. My wife and I have both known victims of sexual assault, and I’ll be honest the scene in the movie even as it was made me a little uncomfortable. It wasn’t really necessary at all to keep the story going, and like others said had the potential to really deflate an otherwise upbeat, ridiculously violent fun movie. I went back and read the comic and the movie scene isn’t that much different, it still leaves it up to the viewers imagination as to what really happened.

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