Jurassic World – the fourth installment in the Jurassic Park franchise – doesn’t arrive until next June, but we’ve already gotten an early look at the human characters making their screen debut in the film. There’s also going to be at least one never before seen dinosaur featured in the movie – and although it’ll probably be a while still before we see the creature in full, director Colin Trevorrow has taken to Twitter to offer his followers what may well be a sneak peek at the new beastie.

Trevorrow has confirmed that Jurassic World revolves around a functional version of Jurassic Park that is operating in the present-day. However, the resort/biological preserve has also been around long enough for the general public to no longer be as entranced as once they were, with the variety of once-prehistoric lifeforms that are on display.

As such, Trevorrow has revealed that in the film, the park’s scientists are given a “corporate mandate”: create something “bigger, louder, with more teeth,” which is meant to wow the public and help re-ignite faltering interest in the dino-themed amusement park (though, we’re betting the decision ends up having some undesirable consequences). It could well be that this new genetically-engineered specimen is the dinosaur teased in the Jurassic World set image featured below, which Trevorrow posted to his Twitter account with the simple caption of “Nights.”


For those who missed it, here’s the extended version of what Trevorrow previously had to say, about the new dinosaur that’ll be introduced in Jurassic World:

“… The gaps in her sequence were filled with DNA from other species, much like the genome in the first film was completed with frog DNA. This creation exists to fulfill a corporate mandate—they want something bigger, louder, with more teeth. And that’s what they get.

“I know the idea of a modified dinosaur put a lot of fans on red alert, and I understand it. But we aren’t doing anything here that [Michael] Crichton didn’t suggest in his novels. This animal is not a mutant freak. It doesn’t have a snake’s head or octopus tentacles. It’s a dinosaur, created in the same way the others were, but now the genetics have gone to the next level. For me, it’s a natural evolution of the technology introduced in the first film. Maybe it sounds crazy, but most of my favorite movies sound crazy when you describe them in a single sentence.”

It was previously rumored that an early draft of the Jurassic World script – one that is reported to have since been heavily revised by Trevorrow and screenwriter Derek Connolly (Safety Not Guaranteed) – included “underwater dinos” – and, judging by some of the film’s artwork featured at the Licensing Expo in Las Vegas this week (see below, via Coming Soon), that looks to still be the case. Could it be that the “modified dinosaur” teased by Trevorrow and the one hinted at in the latest set image, are one and the same as the aquatic creature shown here, with the “It’s Feeding Time!” tagline? (Their jawlines certainly seem alike.)


Trevorrow has also revealed that one of the central themes explored in Jurassic World is the idea that “we’ve become numb to the scientific miracles around us,” in modern times. It’s a worthwhile concept to explore and one that’s new territory for the Jurassic Park franchise. It also lends a meta aspect to the Jurassic World storyline, as we live in a time where blockbusters have gotten increasingly big and flashy in their presentation – to the point where many moviegoers are not so easily blown away by the tentpoles that Hollywood has to offer, especially those that sacrifice coherence for scale.

Will Jurassic World manage to astonish as Steven Spielberg’s film once did – or, failing that, prove that there’s still a fair amount of life left in the Jurassic Park brand? That remains to be seen, though we like what we’ve heard and seen from Trevorrow’s dino adventure thus far, which is encouraging.

Jurassic World opens in U.S. theaters on June 12th, 2015.

Source: Colin Trevorrow, Coming Soon