The Jurassic Park series includes some of the most beloved dinosaur movies ever made. With it’s excellent cast of characters, the best animatronic dinosaurs ever made, and ridiculous heel running scenes, it isn’t exactly hard to see why.

When film goers are swept up in the excellent score that accompanies the ensuing prehistoric carnage, sometimes they don’t pay as much attention to the plot as they should. If they were, they may be asking a few more questions as opposed to talking about how awesome Chris Pratt is (although he is a really cool guy).

Seriously, there are some glaring plot holes in the Jurassic Park franchise to the point where they could easily break the immersion if more people took notice. From shape shifting Tyrannosaurs paddocks to bullets magically not killing things, there are some discrepancies that can’t be ignored, no matter how awesome the movies are.

However painful it may be, the public needs to know about these plot holes, even though InGen will deny, deny, deny, and Dr. Hammond will pop bottles of champagne, even though he could have ended the entire catastrophic chain of events in the first 45 minutes of the first movie.

So get ready Jeff Goldblum fans and clever girls, these are the 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Jurassic Park Movies.

15. How’d He Miss?

Jurassic Park Dr Grant pondering why he was unable to shoot a gun Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

After Dr. Grant, Ellie, and the kids are all reunited and the phones come back online. They discover that there are two raptors actively stalking the park. As Alan is on the phone, Ellie announces: “it’s coming through the glass!

When the film cuts back, it shows an abandoned shotgun on the ground leaking unfired shells. It also shows that there are three holes in the glass where Alan presumably shot at the raptor as it tried to enter through the door’s glass window.

So, Dr. Grant shot at the invading raptor, which stands about 6 feet tall, missed despite hitting the center of the window three times, and then dropped a still loaded shotgun. Again, an easily controllable firearm, hitting a large target that is confined to a small target area, which he does manage to hit three times center mass, and somehow misses the raptor.

Where else would the raptor have been if not in the middle of the glass that it was coming through? Why drop a shotgun that still has at least three more unspent shells loaded? Given the factors at play, it would have been easy for Dr. Grant to make a stand in that locked room.

14. The Lysine Contingency

Jurassic Park dino egg Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

In the first Jurassic Park, after the T-Rex has attacked the caravan of visitors, the survivors stationed in the panic room are discussing their options. Samuel L. Jackson and Muldoon briefly bring up the Lysine Contingency before Richard Hammond shoots it down and it’s never mentioned again.

Basically, the Lysine Contingency is a genetic failsafe built into each dino in the park that prohibits them from producing the essential amino acid Lysine, requiring it to be supplied by park staff. Without Lysine, the terrifying attractions slip into a coma and die within a few days.

Hammond’s view is entirely financially motivated; understandably it’s expensive to artificially create dinosaurs, plus he’d be admitting that the park was a failure. So stop supplying Lysine, and they’d still only last a few weeks at best.

As to the survivors ability to last that long, of course they could. There’s an entire buffet spread that is featured being picked at multiple times by survivors, and if that spoils, there are always vending machines. That is, unless Nedry cleaned them out beforehand…

13. What Happened To The Boat?

The Lost World Jurassic Park boat e1501615446206 Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

In The Lost World: Jurassic Park, a boat is headed for the docks carrying an adult T-Rex and its cub. After repeated unanswered hails and a seriously destructive entrance, it’s easy to see why none of the crew answered the radio– they’ve all been turned into blood stains on the top deck.

As Goldblum and company investigate the ship, they find the controls for the cargo hold in the severed arm of a crew member and, like a complete dingus, decide to hit the button and open it on up, revealing that the adult T-Rex they were expecting to be on the boat was indeed on the boat. Something doesn’t add up here.

So the T-Rex was still locked up in the cargo hold when the ship crashes… so what actually ate the entire crew? It’s not like the T-Rex was able to get out, murder the entire crew, and then lock itself below deck after the massacre.

Apparently a scene that never made it into the movie shows a velociraptor making it aboard and attacking the crew, hence the crew being splattered all over the place. Still, where’s the raptor and why cut a vital scene like that out of the movie?

12. Always Do Your Research

The Kirbys Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

In Jurassic Park III, Dr. Grant travels with the Kirby’s, a seemingly wealthy couple, to look for their son who touched down on Site B after the boat his parasail is attached to is attacked. Dr. Grant is under the impression that the Kirby’s will reward him handsomely for his assistance in helping them navigate the island and find out what happened to their son.

Until the Kirby’s reveal that Kirby Enterprises never existed and they’re completely broke. Apparently, research is not Dr. Grant’s strong suit, even though he’s a palaeontologist turned action hero.

Plus, his constant warnings of not touching down on the island and his seemingly overwhelming resentment to not participate in the excursion in the first place, would lead one to believe that he’d look into the guy who’s promising him a handsome sum for his assistance in a situation he’d rather avoid.

All he needed to do was a quick Google search and he would have saved himself another dino filled vacation. Dr. Grant wouldn’t even have to do the research, he could have easily told his assistant to do the legwork and skip all the trouble.

11. Nacho Raptors

Nacho Raptors Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

One of the main pulls of Jurassic World was that Chris Pratt was going to be commanding his own pack of raptors. Although the verdict was split when fans saw a gang of raptors escorting Pratt through the jungle as he rides a dirt bike, it turned out to be alright.

In the full film, Pratt’s character Owen commands a pack of genetically modified raptors that seem to follow his whims to a degree. So, with Pratt being the pack’s Alpha, it seems surprising that the Indominus Rex is able to turn their loyalty so quickly.

It takes a matter of seconds for the raptors that accompany Pratt to the Indominus Rex site to turn quicker than Benedict Arnold, falling under the leadership of the genetic mishmash super-saur.

This could be explained by the Indominus Rex’s genetic makeup being part raptor, meaning that it’s able to talk to them in their own tongue. Still, for raptors that have been genetically toned down to be attractions and listen to Owen, it seems a little sudden.

Plus, one of those same raptors helps kill the same dinosaur it was taking commands from a few hours ago, and then listens to Owen when he tells it not to attack the survivors.

10. Depths Unseen

Wheres The Goat Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

The T-Rex scene in the original Jurassic Park is one of the most memorable. After the initial attack, Dr. Grant has to save Timmy after the car is flipped over the side of the T. Rex paddock, as Lex and him are repelling down the side using a loose cable. Wait, repel down the side? Then how did the T-Rex even get out of the pen in the first place?

That wall is easily fifty feet tall, if not more, so how did the T-Rex ever get out? It certainly didn’t climb and isn’t able to jump very high. Then, when Ellie and Muldoon find Ian buried in the remains of the bathroom and what’s left of  Gennaro, they find the other car. When they spot the other vehicle they seemingly teleport to the car’s final resting spot and then seemingly teleport back up when Ian starts to suspect that the T-Rex is inbound.

So which is it? Is the pen at ground level, or is it dropped a healthy fifty feet below the path? How did they see it eat the goat– if the exhibit is that low, how’d it throw a goat with that much force and accuracy to land on the kid’s jeep?

9. Anything But Snakes!

Jurassic Park T Rexes Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

In Jurassic Park: The Lost World, the expedition goes wrong after the team royally pisses off Mama and Papa T-Rex. When the sleeping camp is caught off guard (somehow), by the two massive dino parents, a frenzied retreat through the jungle finds Nick, Sarah, and a few others trapped by a snooping T-Rex in a small alcove behind a waterfall.

The T-Rex has some difficulty reaching the small band of survivors due to the size of the opening, meaning that they’ve just been saved by sheer luck. That is until Dr. Burke (the bespectacled dinosaur expert working for InGen), has a snake climb down his shirt, sending him scurrying out into the open mouth of the waiting T-Rex.

It’s understandable that people are afraid of snakes, but it’s a sure bet that they’re probably a lot more afraid of what is essentially a giant walking lizard. The snake doesn’t even get in his shirt, it’s sliding down between his denim vest and flannel; all he had to do was open the vest and let the snake continue on its way.

Or ask someone to help him get the snake out, or anything else besides running into the waiting maw of certain death.

8. Usain Rex

TRex Chase Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

The chase scene involving the T-Rex and the jeep full of survivors is one of the most well known in the original Jurassic Park (pretty much anything with the T-Rex falls into that category). That T-Rex is so close to munching on some sweet Goldblum Jheri Curl that it can already taste the hair spray.

As everyone knows, the jeep is able to speed off after Goldblum finally feels the gearshift digging into his back and Muldoons lead foot saves our survivors. Except that a T-Rex could never even get close to catching up to that Jeep, even when Goldblum is locking it in a lower gear.

Thanks to some seriously smart people with some serious time, it’s now thought that a T-Rex could only hit 20-25 miles per hour at top speed; deadly if you’re running on foot, but barely a threat if you’re in a vehicle that can go over 30 mph.

7. So Many Dinosaurs, So Little Time

Bracheiosarus Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

It’s hypothesized that most dinos took more than a few years to reach their full size; a T-Rex usually being predicted to take 20-25 years to get as big as the one in the original Jurassic Park. So then, how the heck long has Hammond been making attractions?

The educational film that is featured in the original Jurassic Park mentions that with “recent advancements in science and cloning technologies, that they were able to finally produce living dinosaurs.

How recent? Even if it was 25 years ago, a Brachiosaurus was predicted to live a hundred years, meaning that they wouldn’t hit full size until well into their life cycle. With “recent” usually indicating the last few years, it seems unlikely that full sized dinos would be prowling the park this early.

6. When Are We?

TImeline e1501615233590 Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

Although “Jurassic Park” has a serious ring to it, Hammond should have named his failed dream park “A Whole Bunch Of Dinosaurs From All The Hell Over The Place Park.” Obviously not as catchy but definitely more accurate, as the dinosaurs featured in the original park and seen at Site B in other entries in the series are from all over the dino timeline.

While this might seem like a slight factual oversight, the implications are far worse; palaeontologists do their best to guess how the complex relationships between dinosaurs in their respective time periods related and interacted with each other.

Dropping a whole bunch of handpicked specimens from all over a timeline that spans hundreds of millions of years is troubling. The unknown interactions between species could have made things much worse than they already turned out.

5. Call The Army, Call The Navy!

Jurassic Park III Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

In Jurassic Park III, Ellie ends up calling the Navy and Marines to inform them that Dr. Grant and a few others are currently in danger in Site B. First of all, what number did she call? You can call the respective branches of the armed services, but to not request their help in rescuing people off a privately owned island. The other baffling question that is never answered is: who cares?

Site B is owned by InGen, meaning that they would have to give the word on the government being able to send their landing forces to rescue a recluse palaeontologist, his young associate, and a divorced couple that own a bankrupt tile shop in Oklahoma. In other words, fat chance.

If anything, InGen would probably want to shut up anyone (especially Dr. Grant), who inadvertently stumbled their way onto the island to cover their butts, let alone tell other people about the dinosaurs that were still walking around in the first place.

Even if InGen wanted to assist, why would they send government forces and not their own privately employed mercenaries?

4. Restricted Fly Space

Pterodactyl e1501615129786 Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

The pterodactyl scene in Jurassic Park III is one of a few redeeming scenes in an otherwise terrible movie. Sure, it has its Hollywood element to it, making it barely bearable, but the first time that pterodactyl walks out of the fog, it’s pretty darn cool.

General pterodactyl skullduggery follows, including dive bombing, picking up and dropping people, and the Kirby’s son getting his butt handed to him on a platter by a brood of baby flying lizards.

Cut to the end of the movie and everyone’s making jokes as a flock of pterodactyls fly over their helicopter, smiles and giggles exchanged all around. Except, why the hell would they act like that when they almost all became baby pterodactyl food no less than fifteen minutes ago?

It’s a safe bet that the correct response would be to tell the military to shoot them to tatters or speed up the engine, not laugh and hope they never come to Oklahoma.

3. That Ain’t Shamu

Mosasaurus  e1501615062860 Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

One of the main attractions driving tourists into Jurassic World– besides the promise of freaking dinosaurs– is a SeaWorld-esque whale show that features one of the largest carnivorous dinosaurs that ever lived: the Mosasaurus. The fossils found indicate that these aquatic killing machines grew upwards of 56 feet and liked to prey in the shallows on things that hung out near the surface of the water.

This is further evidenced when the Mosasaurus hops out of its enclosure and drags the Indominus Rex underwater after the most unrealistic tag team match ever portrayed on the silver screen.

Which means that this thing could have jumped out of the water whenever it wanted and snacked on anything walking by when it felt like it. So, realistically, what’s to keep this thing from jumping up and snacking on a tourist buffet?

2. Lost In Translation

We Cool Craig  e1501615013576 Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

At the end of Jurassic World, the Indominus Rex is defeated by the combined efforts of a T-Rex and Velociraptor. It’s not a happy circumstance where the T-Rex and Raptor just happened to be in the same area attacking the same dinosaur.

The raptor announces its arrival to save the T-Rex from receiving a death blow, jumps on the T-Rex’s back during the fight in order to get a better angle of attack, and coordinates to successfully take the Indominus Rex down.

Then, after seemingly every dinosaur comes together to defeat a singular threat, the T-Rex and Raptor eye each other complete with a little “you’re alright bruh” nod, before heading their separate ways. They don’t just resist attacking each other; they consciously acknowledge each other’s existence and share a longing glance as well.

Somehow, they’re able to communicate their truce, as opposed to the T-Rex and Raptors in the first Jurassic Park, who attack each other with little question.

Considering that Raptors and T-Rex didn’t roam the earth at the same time, there’s no telling how they would have reacted to each other, which adds even more credibility to disproving the fact that they would ever learn to communicate.

1. “Who’s That Dude?”

Whos That Dude Jurassic Park: 15 Most Glaring Plot Holes In The Movies

Before the Navy and Marines storm the beach of Site B in Jurassic Park III, a man in a suit greets the fleeing survivors as they clear the jungle, talking with a bullhorn as they come stumbling onto the beach. “Dr. Grant? Dr. Allen Grant?” he asks, as the stunned group of survivors stare on in disbelief.

What was the point of sending the guy in the suit onto the beach first? If he were an InGen representative, why wouldn’t they secure the beach before he started broadcasting his position? Also, how did that guy get there in the first place?

Kirby says he hears a helicopter, which is what sends them running for the beach, but that thing is a ways off in the distance, leaving his method of arrival a mystery. Plus, what if none of them had been Dr. Grant? “Sorry, we’re only here to save Alan Grant, you’ll have to wait for the next deployment of Marines to pull you out.”

Can you think of any other glaringly obvious plot holes in the Jurassic Park movies? Sound off in the comment section!

  • Ad Free Browsing
  • Over 10,000 Videos!
  • All in 1 Access
  • Join For Free!
GO PREMIUM WITH SCREENRANT
Go Premium!

More Videos