Jackie Chan has gone on-and-off about plans to fully leave behind his days making action movies; that’s understandable, given that the martial arts icon turned 58 earlier this year. However, just because Chan intends to hang up his hat – as far as crazy stunts and gymnastic fight choreography goes – that doesn’t mean he’s done playing action heroes just yet.

Chan is currently developing a new English-language, action-comedy, based on his own original story idea. However, for the time being, the project is without either an official title or director (though, Chan could very well assume helmer duties, once post-production is complete on his most recent film, Chinese Zodiac).

Heat Vision reports that Chan has recruited up-and-comer Jay Longino to script his new action-comedy, which Chan will also produce. Longino only has one major writing credit on his resume to date (the direct-to-video Bachelor Party 2: The Last Temptation), but FX recently purchased his pilot script for the TV series Raising Blind. Moreover, Longino is also working on the scripts for a pair of John Singleton projects: the action-thrillers Layover and Broken Run (Hunger Games star Liam Hemsworth is attached to star in the latter). Here’s the lowdown on the plot for Chan’s new film:

Based on an original idea of Chan’s, the story is a two-hander action comedy featuring a detective (Chan) who must track down an American gambler that has skipped out on his debt owed to a Macau casino syndicate. The settings include Hong Kong, Macau, Eastern Europe and mainland China.

The last time most U.S. moviegoers saw Chan onscreen, it was in the Karate Kid remake (not counting his voice work in Kung Fu Panda 2). Chan has otherwise been focused more on non-Hollywood fare for the past two years – as evidenced by his appearances in Asian films such as Shaolin and 1911 (he also directed the latter), along with the aforementioned Chinese Zodiac and untitled action-comedy vehicle.

Jackie Chan in ‘1911’

Of course, Chan was a well-established star in the Chinese movie business well before he made the jump overseas to the U.S. – and found box office success with the Rush Hour and Shanghai Noon franchises (among other titles). Thus, Chan is really just returning to his roots, by focusing on international projects. So long as he continues to deliver quality products, it’s not as though Chan’s dedicated fans are really going to care where his films are set, right? They might be happier, actually, given that Chan’s least-popular offerings over the past decade have mostly come from Tinseltown (The Tuxedo, The Spy Next Door), but, moving on…

We’ll keep an eye out for additional information on Chan’s new action-comedy. In the meantime, for any Screen Rant readers who hail from China: you can look forward to Chinese Zodiac arriving in theaters this December (it does not appear to have a U.S. release date yet, sadly).

Source: THR