‘The Imitation Game’ Trailer: Benedict Cumberbatch is a WWII Code Breaker

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A trailer has been unveiled for this fall’s The Imitation Game, a movie about Alan Turing’s role in breaking the Enigma code used by Nazi Germany in WWII – starring Benedict Cumberbatch as the famous mathematician and logician. While the trailer primarily focuses on the race-against-time/thriller aspect of the story, it has been indicated that Imitation Game will also deal with Turing’s life after he became a hero in the second World War – including, the horrible fate that eventually befell him.

Related to that – there’s a reference to Turing being gay in the Imitation Game trailer; presumably, the actual film will touch upon how he was forced to undergo chemical castration because of his sexual preferences (leading to him committing suicide). It’s a disturbing end to Turing’s story, even ignoring how he’s been dubbed by many historians as the “Father of Theoretical Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence.” (Not exactly something you focus on during a trailer to market the film- not even an potential awards season contender.)

Indeed, The Weinstein Company has positioned Imitation Game to serve as Oscar bait this fall – and while the trailer does include a somewhat formulaic moment of Turing’s coworkers rallying to support him (despite his prickly nature), overall the film seems to be a solid piece of historical drama, all things considered. Certainly, it looks to be a pleasantly handsome movie in terms of aesthetics, with very fine-looking production design by Maria Djurkovic (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) and costumes from Sammy Sheldon (X-Men: First Class).

imitation game benedict cumberbatch The Imitation Game Trailer: Benedict Cumberbatch is a WWII Code Breaker

Imitation Game is the feature debut for screenwriter Graham Moore, though the film was directed by someone with a bit more experience, in the shape of Moreten Tyldum (helmsman on the acclaimed Headhunters). Starring alongside Cumberbatch are such well-respected names as Keira Knightley (Begin Again), Matthew Goode (Stoker), Mark Strong (Low Winter Sun), Charles Dance (Game of Thrones), and Rory Kinnear (Penny Dreadful), among others.

The Imitation Game opens in U.S. theaters on November 21st, 2014.

Source: The Weinstein Company

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  1. thanks, Sandy, for giving away the ending and what could have been a powerful moment in a film about someone I don’t know about.
    now what’s the point of watching this film? it loses it’s gravity. thanks!

    • “… now what’s the point of watching this film?”

      Well, to see whether or not it does justice by the real Alan Turing’s life, essentially. Knowing what eventually happened to him (which, as far I can tell, is fairly common knowledge, relatively speaking) won’t diminish that effect, if the film is done well. If anything, I imagine it will only add a layer of poignance to everything that happens onscreen.

    • Anyone who studied 11th grade history knew how his life went, this isn’t exactly “fictional” stuff…

      • But what if you dropped out in 10th? :-(

    • Could have been worse. At least they didn’t tell us who wins the war so should still be some surprises for you.

      • I never heard of this guy. until I read the second paragraph, I knew nothing about this guy.
        they don’t teach about this guy in every 11th grade class.
        But since the rest of you know so much about this guy, then you don’t need to see this film either, if it’s old hat to you.

        • Well, according to that logic there is no need at all to make movies about history…or?

          • Actually, no. According to his logic you shouldn’t WATCH historical movies if you’re well informed on the topic. Because lots of people will be clueless as to who he is: they shall be the ones who’ll it’ll most serve. As they’re now getting informed.
            But anyway, I learned about this guy but I never knew his sexual orientation was never discussed in my Philosophy class. Either way, at the end of the day emotion is emotion, if handled properly it’ll still affect you deeply even if you know how it ends.

  2. I don’t understand why I have to watch a movie for the same reasons everyone else watches a movie.
    I like certain kinds of movies and I’d rather not be told what happens in the film before I watch it.
    It is sufficient to say that he was a code breaker.
    if you feel the need to add he was gay too, fine. but s*** man, don’t tell me how he dies and what happens to him.
    that’s what I’m watching for.
    When I watch an Indiana Jones movie, I watch it because it’s about an archeaologist (however that’s spelled) chasing after the Grail. I don’t need to know what happens to the grail.
    When I watch Empire Strikes Back, I want to watch the continuation of Star Wars. I dont’ need to know what happens to Luke’s appendage or how he finds a long-lost family member.
    let me watch and be surprised.
    that’s like someone talking during the movie and telling me what happens before it happens. let me watch it for myself.
    But I guess I can’t. can I? I have to already know who this guy is from my 11th grade history teacher (who did not teach me this) and then (without spoiler warning) I have to find out what happens in the movie before I see it. I never even heard of this movie till today but now I don’t need to see it.
    If you guys don’t mind knowing everything that happens in a film before you see it, watch the preview for “Friday the 13th” the one they made a few years back. it shows you every death in the preview.

  3. To those of you who are confused about the 11th grade comment above, it’s because this historical character is mainly taught in history classes over in Europe. America (depending upon the teacher and curriculum) doesn’t teach much or anything about him. This doesn’t make him less important just means American’s couldn’t or didn’t want to fit him into their studies.

  4. Seems truly captivating and intriguing ! Haven’t watched a complete Benedict Cumberbatch movie yet, missed the WIKILEAKS and surely hope to catch on this wonderful, epic n biopic probably…

  5. !!! Potential Spoilers!! (even though it’s history)

    “…he was forced to undergo chemical castration because of his sexual preferences (leading to him committing suicide).”

    Although the official report says he committed suicide, according to many sources, including Turing’s co-workers, friends and his mother, he did not commit suicide; he was poisoned by the chemicals he worked with.

    (I also think it’s a leap to say it was ’caused’ by his chemical castration, it could have very easily been 50 other things, if it was suicide at all.)

    The movie looks really interesting; I just hope they don’t show his end as interpreted by the 1954 coroner’s report of suicide; the same coroner that didn’t even perform a chemical test on the apple that supposedly killed him.

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