‘Hunger Games’ Movie Spoilers Discussion

Published 2 years ago by , Updated September 18th, 2012 at 8:08 am,

The Hunger Games movie Logo Hunger Games Movie Spoilers Discussion

While our readers are already talking about this movie in the comments section of our Hunger Games Review, this is the place where you can discuss The Hunger Games spoilers without concerns about ruining the movie for folks who haven’t seen it yet.

If you’re posting comments here, assume that anyone in the conversation has seen the movie – if you haven’t seen the movie, we would recommend you don’t read the comments here until you have. 

We’ve set up a poll below where you can rate The Hunger Games for yourself. Other than that, feel free to discuss the film and all its surprises!

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  1. As a parent, I am sad that this is so popular. I am not trying to belittle any of you teens; but you are all growing up too fast! Why? When I was growing up, there was never a pregnant Middle School Student. Now they are everywhere. The fault rests on society and its degradation and the teachers and administrators that no longer hold themselves in high moral regard. There are elementary teachers discussing Jersey Shores in earshot of the students, teachers wearing shirts that show cleavage, and other indecencies all around. I think this movie is okay for high school students, but not for Junior High/Middle school. Much like most first graders will not be able to perform multiplication and division, the 12-15 year old age group is not emotionally or academically ready to comprehend this kind of brutality and violence. As an adult, I have pressures and problems that believe me, you would not want to deal with. I feel bad for you young people who are being robbed of your childhood. You’re only young for a very brief time in your lives…

    • Dee- did you read the books? There’s a huge lesson to be learned by the trilogy; the kids forced to kill other kids is just the part people choose to focus on, but for me, that really wasn’t the point- it’s more about the government and their control on a population! I read books with similar themes in middle school, anyway. Lord of the Flies, Animal Farm, 1984. (Not to mention the other books we had to read that dealt with other horrible topics: racism, the Holocaust, slavery, real historical wars!) Also, high school students tend to be 14 when they start.. so since the movie is pg-13, only those middle school students that are about to be in high school should be going. Not disagreeing with what you are saying about kids today growing up quicker, but that seems like a completely different topic than the movie.

      Also, wanted to say, I saw the movie for the second time last night. And, after feeling disappointed by some left out moments the first time- I was able to know what was going to happen, and therefore I wasn’t as disappointed. (ie: I was sad about the cut cave scene between Katniss and Peeta- so the second viewing, I knew that the 2 kisses between them was all I’d get. Therefore, I made sure to “enjoy” those 2 more, and not expect anything else)

      • Yes Animal farm was the book that came into my mind when I read this Hunger games trilogy. The theme of rebellion against the oppressors and then after the victory, the winners becoming as bad, or even worse than the previous ones, sprung straight into my head. Far from being bad for youngsters to read, to me they are good. I did wonder about my 10 year old grandaughter seeing the movie, but she loved it and I talked to her about it both before and after and was quite satisified. She has seen much worseviolence on the news and on tv in ordinary things like soap operas. I also agree that the topic ofkids growing up too quick is a totaly differnt subject than this film, To me the music industry is the worst culprit here, I was appalled at the sight of the pop star guests performances on x factor a couple fo years ago and to see little girls apeingthe sexual dance moves of these pop videos scares the life out of me. This movie does not

      • I am a 68 year old grandmother. I was introduced to the books by my teenage grandaughters and loved them. I have read all three books twice and couldnt wait to see the movie. I was not disapointed I thought it was really good. To me the theme of the books, which doesn’t really become apparant until the last one,is more complex than most people realise. It is one of taking care that in rising up against oppressors, you dont yourselves become oppressors in turn. The hatred unleashed by the war, resulting in the killing of the sick and the innocent by those who themselves decried the callousness of the other side. The potential idea of starting another hunger games themselves against the innocent children in the capital, in retributiion, once they are victorious and becoming as bad in the end as their previous oppressors. Rather like the theme in the Harry Potter series of hatred and descrimination by the wizarding world against those who are differnt from themselves, ie the Muggles, and where does it stop, once unleashed? Like the Nazis. Quite grown up themes and philosophies and good ones to introduce to teenagers. My ten year old grandaughter loved the film and I see nothing wrong with that at all. I dont understand the reservations of Dee about it at all. As a parent and grandparent I think a discussion with teenagers about these themes as shown in these books can only be beneficial and invaluble in shaping young minds. Also as an avid reader and ex librarian I applaud the fact that these books encourage young people to read.

    • Dee…

      Several points:

      1. Youthful pregnancies, rapes, etc. DID occur in the past (true, not NEARLY as much or as frequently as today, but still…), but they were often hidden away or outright denied so as not to disturb societal expectations.

      2. The fault rests with a lax society, often degraded educational system, AND negligent (perhaps even downright criminally stupid) parents.

      3. Stories with very similar themes/concepts are read in middle school as part of the accepted (and I think necessary) curriculum.

      I DO agree that today’s kids are asked to grow up too quickly, but the issue is not so black and white.

      • All of the evidence suggests that violent movies have no impact on teens whatsoever. Teen pregnancies and societal violence are at all time lows, despite a poor economy and high unemploymnet, things that traditionally trigger both. IN fact, worldwide, nearly every kind of violent crime is rapidly plummeting, check any data list and you can verify this. However, the increasing role of social media makes every little event and act seem greater and more all-encompassing than it really is. So are we just getting more civilized, then? Indeed, the decline in violence coincides with global evidence of converging attitudes towards greater toleration. For example, the proportion of people worldwide who say they wouldn’t want to have a neighbor of a different religion dropped from 67 percent to 48 percent between the early 1990s and the mid-2000s. Turn on the television and you’d be sure to think that political dialogue is getting more rancid by day. And it might be, but people’s attitudes are actually becoming more pacific and tolerant.

        Cultural factors are important, then. But before you rush to deride the Federal Communications Commission and the Supreme Court for their lackadaisical attitude to violence on television, note that the trend towards more — and more graphic — violence on TV doesn’t quite sync with the pattern of crime rates. A culture of violence and violence in popular culture are two very different things. In fact, one more element of cultural change that may behind declining violence is the substitution of fantasy violence for the real thing. French historian Robert Muchembeld argues in his book, History of Violence, that crime fiction and novels about war have given young men a way to indulge in violent fantasies without actually going out and stabbing someone. Or, over the last few years, they could stab someone playing Grand Theft Auto rather than stab someone while actually committing grand theft auto. This is the blood-and-gore version of the argument that more pornography leads to lower sexual violence.
        There might be something to it. While exposing kids to the latest cadaver on CSI — or to Jack Bauer’s lessons in successful torture on 24 — is probably a bad idea, watching an action movie might in fact reduce violence among adults. A recent study in the Quarterly Journal of Economics suggests that violent crime rates actually dropped when a blood-splattered blockbuster was in the cinema in the United States. The authors Gordon Dahl and Stefano Della Vigna looked at data from 1995 to 2004 and concluded that violent movies deter almost 1,000 assaults on an average weekend in the United States.
        Perhaps humanity will never completely abandon its lust for blood. But it appears that lust can in fact be sated using fake blood wielded by Hollywood special-effects technicians. And outside the theater, people respond to behavioral cues — if their friends don’t stab people to win an argument, they are less likely to do it themselves. They also respond to institutional cues — if they can use the courts to settle a dispute or address a wrong, they’re less likely to resort to blood feuds. All of which suggests the hope that, in years to come, there will be a lot more deaths on TV and movie screens than in the real world.

    • I’m sorry but don’t you dare blame this on teachers and administrators. Blame the parents. Our rights as teachers are being ripped away from us daily and you want me to believe that I am responsible for the way teens are today? I’d tell you to kiss my ass but that would be rude. I’ll just say get a flipping clue as to who is REALLY responsible for the way Kids are today. THEIR PARENTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • I’m in a Single Subject Credential program right now, and I feel your frustration in being blamed for society’s problems. But laying blame on any one group of people isn’t going to help either (even though I agree, parents are typically the students’ heaviest influence). Be that as it may, there’s a huge collaboration process that has to occur before we get serious results. That collaboration has to take place between the parents and the teachers, and of course the students too.

        Unfortunately, if these groups don’t support each other, nothing gets done. Parents not respecting teachers is reflected in our culture; it’s a big part of the reason why kids lack respect for their school instructors, though other factors are in play for their behavior as well. Teachers not respecting parents is the result of their frustration toward being blamed [indeed, educational reform is a popular topic in political debates] and having to deal with the craziness of their students’ adolescent woes.

    • Dee- You are right in your opinion, although you do have to remember this is a film. It isn’t bases on reality, but only for entertainment. I see where you are coming from as a parent, and I value your opinion but this is a great film. I most certainly don’t like how people are making it as Twilight ! Thi trilogy has meaning and should be worthy as it’s own series, not brought or compared to something it’s not. They only have a love triangle to add drama and suspense to make you think. Thank you for your time …

    • just to let you know, teen pregnancies have reached an all time low, the only difference being people are more public, when you get pregnant, you got married and you disappeared. and i’m so tired of censorship! how am i supposed to learn and grow if im not exposed to anything? not trying to be rude but come on…

    • I know, this is a young adult novel, but as a fourteen year old teenager, I found the Hunger Games so great because of it’s harsh critique, how far a nation can get for a fun, and also because of the author’s exaggerated view of the reality, because the idea about the Capitol is maybe an opposite of the reality, but when you think about it, the Capitol is maybe near you then you think. This idea, about entertainment, is exactly what might happen. Children forced to kill another children? Maybe not. But what about the whole nations everywhere, that remind us of District 12, the nations that have to fight for food everyday, or walk for dozens of miles just for a bottle of water? And this is why I like the Hunger Games, the critique of the harsh reality.

    • I really cant agree with you Dee. I am 68 years old and certainly had a totally different childhood in a totally different more innocent world than the young ones today. The influences on young children that appall me today are all around them, advertising indoctrination into spending more and more money on expensive branded goods. Soft porn pop videos, the cult of celebrity and the sexualisation of little girls. The get famous “its my dream” mentality of the x factor contestants, who want to be famous at all costs in a get rich quick mentality that doesnt want any hard work. So many things worry me about the world that my grandchildren are being brought up in. However these books and film are not among them. I spend a lot of my time as a grandparent encouraging my grandchildren to read and to look at the world with a critical analising eye. These books teach them to think.

    • Dee- Well this book was written for the tween-teen age group and yes, im a teen but I agree that some tweens-teens are being robbed of child-hood do to electronics, but It’s not like someone is going to go hurt somebody because they saw it in a movie. Yes this is your opinion and its not wrong but I really can’t agree with you after reading that, coming from a teen who hasent been robbed of childhood (:

  2. I First of all, I have read all three books, and I couldnt wait for the movie to come out, as I loved all the books. I went to see the premier and I have mixed feelings about the movie.

    Now, I dont care about little differences like the colour of the cat or the Cornucopia, as those are not really that important to the story and can be done without. Even Peetas leg being replaced isnt really mentioned that much later in the books. But what about the force field? That plays quite a big role in the later books.

    The scenes were a bit rushed. Rue and Katniss didnt really connect. If I hadnt read the books, I dont think I would have cared too much about Rue dying. She hardly played any role in the arena, except for showing Katniss the tracker jacker nest. Thresh was supposed to ask Katniss about Rue instead of just shouting “Just this time 12!” The scene could have been played out better. If they had only cut the scene with District 11 rebelling, and maybe cut some of Seneca Cranes scenes, they could have added other things, like Katniss explaining why she has to hunt, and maybe the Games could have been longer, as I just felt they were too rushed. We hardly got to know Rue and her district.

    Thats my biggest problem with the movie, as I felt everything was too rushed. But overall the movie was actually pretty good, and I liked Haymitch especially. The cast were brilliant and I look forward to seeing the the sequel.

    • Agreed, although maybe I would choose to cut other scenes. I don’t remember District 11 rebelling in the first book (I haven’t read the last two books yet) so it was an emotionally potent surprise to me. Heck, I even shed a tear. Totally unexpected.

  3. I had no intention of writing a comment until I read a post that has made me a little angry. I am the parent of a 15 year old boy. He read each of the Hunger Game books and then encouraged dozens of his friends (as well as his mother) to read this series. I do not understand how anyone can criticize these books. For these 2 very simple facts 1. A 15 year old JR high school boy is reading (for his own entertainment) 2. That said boy is having lively conversations with his parents, teachers and peers regarding these books.

    Bravo to the author – You have accomplished what many others have failed to do, you have kids reading and talking.

    Oh by the way we have also both seen the movie – He rates it poorly (1 1/2) I rate it slightly higher at 3 1/2.
    I was very impressed with the casting. I thought they did a very good job matching these actors to the characters

  4. Just got back from seeing it with my 10-year old son and his friend. My son read both HG and Mockingbird. I didn’t read either one.

    I thought it COULD have been a good movie IF:
    1. It were about 45 minutes shorter.
    2. The screen display wasn’t so nauseating. Jiggling the picture around on the screen? What’s up with that? Didn’t add any value to the movie whatsoever, and made me near-nauseous.

    That’s my 2 bits – no spoilage. Oh- one more thing. Hadn’t seen the female lead before, but I’m betting she becomes a major star.

  5. the person who plays katniss is hot and has a nice rack , id definetly do her HARD

    #swagg

  6. You like dat comment Isaac ^^^

  7. First of all I would like to that the author of the hunger games because many books don’t interest me but this one did the whole time I was reading it I was affraid that peeta was going to die when u read these parts of the book all u feel is emotion witch is the best part him not dying in the end is great the love triangle between peeta gale And katniss is so great books relating to love really gets peoples attention because they want to feel the same love. Thanks Suzanne Collins for writing such a amazing book !!!!!!!!

  8. First of all I would like to that the author of the hunger games because many books don’t interest me but this one did the whole time I was reading it I was affraid that peeta was going to die when u read these parts of the book all u feel is emotion witch is the best part him not dying in the end is great the love triangle between peeta gale And katniss is so great books relating to love really gets peoples attention because they want to feel the same love. Thanks Suzanne Collins for writing such a amazing book

  9. First of all I would like to that the author of the hunger games because many books don’t interest me but this one did the whole time I was reading it I was affraid that peeta was going to die when u read these parts of the book all u feel is emotion witch is the best part him not dying in the end is great the love triangle between peeta gale And katniss is so great books relating to love really gets peoples attention because they want to feel the same love.Thanks Suzanne Collins for writing such a amazing book

  10. Modern barbarism in which children and youngsters kill other children and youngsters. Great message for our society. The movie could have been fantastic if the killing part was not there. They could have been trapped or as a team intelligently overcome obstacles. Slaughtering by children in a untra modern society is plain stupid when a bunch of riches are watching with sadistic pleasures.

    • If you take the slaughter out of the Hunger Games, you remove the entire point. It’s like saying you don’t like Gladiator because it’s too violent. In a story about the Holocaust, would you take away the footage of the concentration camps?

      This story tackles distasteful themes because it’s trying to make a point, I’m sorry you can’t see beyond the surface. Maybe when the rebellion is incited and the government overthrown, effectively abolishing the Hunger Games in the next few movies, you’ll understand why these themes are necessary.

      I respect Suzanne Colins for respecting teenagers’ intelligence and ability to comprehend that some things are just /wrong/. These books will one day be studied in schools, like Animal Farm, I’m sure.

      • don’t need a rebellion to remove hunger games from the future. Just need better thinking by adults. You cannot compare with holocaust or gladiator because they did not involve an all children team. I am not hiding away from history but future societies. can be thought better than what is portrayed. You don’t learn drive a car by crashing, so you don’t need such movie themes to incite rebellion to abolish future hunger games. Just a little thought by adults, will go a long way.

  11. I thought the movie wasn’t that good at all, but I think this is because I haven’t read the book. Then again, if a movie requires you to read the book to understand it fully, it’s a bad movie.

    The idea of the story was very interesting, but in every aspect it came a bit short. Lots of things weren’t explained at all and I thought the kids in the Games were utterly stupid:
    - When Katniss is in the tree, surrounded by 4 other competitors (incl Peeta), they decide to wait until she comes down. Why not surround the tree with the 4 of them? Hell, they even put up a campfire NEXT to the tree. Why don’t you set the tree on fire? These supposed trained killers from district 1 and 2 should know better.

    - When Katniss and Peeta are teaming up after Peeta has been healed, they split up for a moment and Katniss hears a cannon shot. Her first reaction is to hysterically run around and scream Peeta’s name as hard as she can. Now, first of all, if it were actually Peeta who got killed, it’s not advisable to go running around and screaming like that as the killer would be very nearby. Second of all, one of the next shots shows Peeta and Katniss looking up in the sky after hearing a cannon shot to see who got killed, since the picture and district of the deceased participant are immensely projected on the force field. Instead of Katniss freaking out before and screaming and easily getting herself killed, she could’ve just looked up in the air !

    I really hated the action scenes as well, because you really couldn’t follow any of it. They were all big blurry images and after 30 seconds somebody would be dead. Not really what I expected from such a brutal story.

    There’s also no connection at all with that Rue girl. I figured that she meant a lot to Katniss as a lot of screentime was spent/wasted on her crying because of her death and picking flowers for her and stuff, but that Rue barely did anything in the movie.

    I have more examples but this post is getting a bit long, so this is my 2 cents for now. Do you agree/disagree?

    • I agree! And I read the books first. I left the theater thinking, I don’t think anyone that didn’t read the books is gonna get this… and at the time, I thought that meant no sequel… but apparently there’s enough of us crazy about the books to rake in the millions. :)

      It left a LOT unanswered, and I really hope the 2nd will be better, or there may not be a finale.

    • I have read all 3 books a couple of months ago and loved it. This series is great and is not realistic so I am sick of people criticizing it because of the killing. I am 12 years old and almost everyone I know has read this series and my teacher is the one who convinced me to read it. Please don’t think I’m a bad kid because I’m not I’m a straight A student. These books have changed my life and for about 2 weeks all I dreamed of at nigh was the Hunger Games while I finished the series in exactly 1 week because I couldn’t put it down. I highly recommend this book to anyone between the age of 11-111:)

      • I totally agree! Although I’m only 12, but I am on a 11th grade reading level. I absolutely adored the first book, liked the second book, but the third book lost me. My friend said Peeta and Katniss had a baby. Not so sure, as I skimmed through the last book. Anyways, I am currently writing a fan fiction where P & Kat have a baby named rose. skip to when she’s 14. Her BFF, a crippled 12 yr old, gets chosen, she volunteers to be tribute. The arena is a cold oblivion, but everyday it gets a little hotter.

    • I have read all 3 books a couple of months ago and loved it. This series is great and is not realistic so I am sick of people criticizing it because of the killing. I am 12 years old and almost everyone I know has read this series and my teacher is the one who convinced me to read it. Please don’t think I’m a bad kid because I’m not I’m a straight A student. These books have changed my life and for about 2 weeks all I dreamed of at night was the Hunger Games. I finished the series in exactly 1 week because I couldn’t put it down. I highly recommend this book to anyone between the age of 11-111:)

      • Good for you Miri. I think the books are great and they get young people reading and thinking about life and that has to be good. Just to see the violence is not to really understand the books at all. My grandaughters aged 13 and 15 introduced me to the books and took me to see the film, they had seen it already, but were keen to take me as well. I loved it and just bought the dvd. My 10 year old grandaughter is now a fan of katniss Everdeen. a much better roll model, in my opinion than many of the shallow celebrities she had liked in the past.Good for you

  12. I don’t get why there’s so much talk about the movie being unclear. I had never heard of the Hunger Games, and in fact didn’t even know it was a book before I set foot in the theater. I had no trouble whatsoever following the movie. It explained what and where Panem was, who sponsors were and what their purpose was, what you got if you won (obscene riches), and I didn’t feel that it was rushed at all. The shakey cam? I forgot about it after a few minutes of adjustment. Rue? I cried like a baby when she died, because there was a clear and obvious connection between her and Katniss. She reminded her of Primrose.

    After seeing the move and adoring it, I got all the books and read them in 3 days, and they were even better. I want to see the movie again with fresh eyes now that I’ve been indoctrinated, but seeing the movie was my introduction to the series, and I just don’t see where the complaints are coming from. Maybe I’m just better at comprehending movies than the rest of you or something? The ability to remember details over the course of a 2 hour movie is fairly strenuous, I know.

    • Yes Nambs I agree with you. I did read the books first,and worried that the film would not show the complexities well, but i think it did. I loved it and saw it at the cinema and have now bought the dvd and watched it twice more.

  13. Interesting this review talks about the under developed characters, but truthfully, haymitch is limited in plot until book 3. Gale? He is barely in books one and two and all he does is add confusion for Katniss. I thought the movie distilled the book well. The book was not about a fight to the death. Katniss doesn’t hunt down the other players for most of the Games; she let’s the others pick each other off. What the movie did better than the book was the love triangle in part because the film picks up the emotional nuances that Katniss herself is blind to. I’m looking forward to the next movies but I hope the director drops the shaky camera technique-it made me feel sick to my stomach.

  14. Didn’t anyone mind the out-of-focus, shaky, cinematography? They did a great job with the story, I just had to close my eyes and fight the nausea. It ruined the film for me.

  15. I can tell bad reviews are mostly coming from people who have read the books. I didn’t and I loved the film, but I also realized that the Katniss – Rue relationship in the book must have been much more intense for making the scene so dramatic. I think it did a good job depicting this on an emotional level, and I absolutely loved Jennifer Lawrence’s acting. This was one of the better movies I have seen in the theater for a while, and I visit the theater a lot. I think it must have grasped the essence of the book fairly well, as I do not feel compelled to read the book because of unanswered questions. If I read the book it will be because it would be like the better, more in-depth version of the story, but that is always what books are compared to films.

  16. Hunger games was by far one of my favvv movies!!!!! 5 stars(: btw, Katniss should choose Peeta! He’s my favorite !!! Peeta<3

    • I haven’t read the books either. And the relationship between the two main characters, at times, seemed fake/forced on because of the predicament they’re in. Yet it’s not that simple. that’s why this is a good film. Because it generates discussion and tackles some very strong themes. I hope the author of the book series is happy with how it’s been adapted, it’s like during the whole fil
      The director is saying, I could go all the way, but I won’t risk it. Instead il playbit safe. And rely on the story to pull this one through. Only negative- I’m struggling with knowledge that many kids under 13 have seen or will see thus film. Just because they tone down the blood and gore isn’t enough to make it a pg13. Or M15 in Aus. M15 rating means kids well under 15 will go with their older siblings or parents to see this. Or watch it by themselves on DVD. And the themes and tone of this movie is far too mature for that in my opinion. I’m deffinately going to read the books now.

      • actually its one of the things that i thought the movie didnt explain well. that katniss’ love for Peeta was actually just an act. she didnt love him she pretended to so she could get sponsors. Peeta does love katniss but she dosent love him it was an act that her and haymitch planned. this was left out and actually becomes a main problem in the next book. so im curious to see how they’re going to do that in the movie.

  17. just saw the movie and never read the books, so one techno-logistic question:

    IF THE HAVE’S CAN MANIPULATE TECHNOLOGY TO THE POINT OF BREAKING BARRIER OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION TO THE PHYSICAL REALM (IE, THOSE CANINE THINGS POPPING UP FROM PIXEL TO EATING PEOPLE) THEN WHY IN THE WORLD DO THEY STILL NEED WORKERS/ SLAVES TO SUPPLY ENERGY OR COMMODITIES??? WOULDN’T IT BE BLOODY SIMPLER TO RENDER ENERGY/ FOOD/ NECESSITIES VIA COMPUTER AND HAVE THEM MANIFEST AS ACTUAL THINGS???

    OR BETTER YET LET’S SAY THE HAVE’S ARE SADOMASOCHISTIC AND SLAVERY IS A PASSION- THEN WHY RISK REBELLION IF THERE IS THE TECH KNOW HOW TO JUST REVERSE THE ARROW AND MAKE THE WORKERS/ SLAVES BELIEVE THEY LIVE IN A MATRIX LIKE DREAM, IE, THEY ARE LIVING AN IDEAL WHILE IN REALITY MINING FOR COAL???

    SOMEBODY HELP ME WITH THIS SEEMINGLY BLATANT CONTRADICATION!

    • precept…

      First of all, don’t use all caps-lock; it’s rude and annoying. Now, on to your questions:

      Both questions actually have the same answer…Yes, the technology is advanced, but not SO much so that human labor can be entirely removed. More importantly, the Capitol WANTS the people of the districts to work hard. Thus, they will be constantly reminded that the Capitol beat them and maintains its absolute control of their lives. Also, they’ll (at least in the Capitol’s estimation) be too tired and broken to rebel ever again. You might remember that NO ONE in the Capitol seems to work particularly hard, if at all (lowly servants excluded of course. The districts, through force, make up for the lack of effort on the Capitol’s part. Thus, the people in the districts will NEVER be allowed to function in a “Matrix”-like illusory world. The Capitol wants every single district member wide awake and fully aware of their punishment and suffering.

      • …oops, there should be a closing parenthesis after “excluded of course”…SHEESH.

  18. I really liked the books…..the third one is the worst….and the saddest!! Poor katniss…. but other than that it was good

  19. Never read the books, just saw the movie. Well acted etc but have questions about the premise:
    1.If the gov’t can start a fire or send out killer cats to change the outcome…and change the rules back & forth-then where is the credibility of the Games. Why would people keep watching if they can tell the gov’t just controls who will win?
    2. What does the winner get? Just to be alive? No riches, or be like Woody & live good & be an adviser? Do they just go back to their prior lives in the district…that’s anticlimactic & disappointing…not much of a point.
    3. Especially given the above, don’t see how The Games would keep anyone from revolting, keep the population in check.
    Do I have to read 3 books to explain this?

    • “Do I have to read 3 books to explain this?”

      No, all of those answers are very clear in the first book. The movie is a terrible adaptation of the book.

      1. The government uses the games to demonstrate their complete domination of the districts. Viewing is required. Everyone in the districts is forced to watch, and refusal is punishable by death.

      2. The winners are rich for life and live in a separate village within their district. They are also required to coach future tributes.

      3. Eventually they do revolt. The games are designed to remind the districts that revolting the last time just made life worse for the districts. The president becomes over-confident of the complete and total domination of the districts and pushes the people too far. Katniss becomes a symbol of defiance that the otherwise hopeless people of the districts can rally around.

      I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. The books are great, but the movie sucks.

      • Thank You Caleb, that explained quite a bit.
        We did think the movie was pretty good (certainly better than the boring, woodenly acted Twilight movies-saw 1st 2) and must say that you can’t judge a movie by its book. But Katniss’s boyfriend back home did say that nobody should watch-no mention of it being obligatory-and generally left the premise pretty shaky.
        By contrast, Cabin in the Woods has its own wild horror movie premise & crazy things happening but ties everything together by the end so you’re happy with the premise.
        Seems that Hunger Games movie could have easily explained this better, but instead don’t & maybe won’t be the same as book.
        But thanks again.

  20. One of the most Interesting yet disturbing films iv seen. I struggle with the fact that many kids well under the age of 13 will be seeing this. But it’s very well done. It had me hanging on the edge through the whole film, with that turned stomach feeling as the characters all attempt to keep it together and do what they must.

  21. This:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hp_xsUg9ws

    (Honest Trailers)

    • Well, they may be CALLED “Honest Trailers”, but that by no means confirms that they are accurate (or even particularly good) trailers…

  22. I am a 68 year old grandmother. I was introduced to the books by my teenage grandaughters and loved them. I have read all three books twice and couldnt wait to see the movie. I was not disapointed I thought it was really good. To me the theme of the books, which doesn’t really become apparant until the last one,is more complex than most people realise. It is one of taking care that in rising up against oppressors, you dont yourselves become oppressors in turn. The hatred unleashed by the war, resulting in the killing of the sick and the innocent by those who themselves decried the callousness of the other side. The potential idea of starting another hunger games themselves against the innocent children in the capital, in retributiion, once they are victorious and becoming as bad in the end as their previous oppressors. Rather like the theme in the Harry Potter series of hatred and descrimination by the wizarding world against those who are differnt from themselves, ie the Muggles, and where does it stop, once unleashed? Like the Nazis. Quite grown up themes and philosophies and good ones to introduce to teenagers. My ten year old grandaughter loved the film and I see nothing wrong with that at all. I dont understand the reservations of Dee about it at all. As a parent and grandparent I think a discussion with teenagers about these themes as shown in these books can only be beneficial and invaluble in shaping young minds. Also as an avid reader and ex librarian I applaud the fact that these books encourage young people to read.

    • Janet…

      Thank you for this and for your above comments. Simply put: YES, exactly.

  23. I ignored the hype of this movie all year, (I figured it was one of those horror movies like Saw b/c of the name). But I ended up buying myself the book for Christmas when my mother told me the movie was actually really good. I read the first two books in a week and absolutely loved them, I even read parts of the book to my 6 year old son- he was fascinated. I was worried to watch the movie, b/c they are always so disappointing, however—I was very impressed! I loved the movie, and thought it was as true to the book as could be. In fact my mother asked me about the differences and there weren’t that many….although Prim wasn’t the original giver of the Mockingjay pin, there wasn’t as much interaction with the capital workers and Katniss – like Cinna, the stylist crew, and even the scenes with the Avox, and of course a lot was left out in the actual games….however I couldn’t say that I was upset. It was amazing to watch the book come to life in movie form, and see that it was really close to what I had just read and watched in my head. I was even very impressed at the way the director used the ‘game commenters’ to add in details I feared people who hadn’t read the book would miss, like the tracker jackers and the land minds. You do get a lot more background from the book, yes, and it’s a very interesting series, I finished the third book a few days ago…and find myself still wandering around thinking of it…can’t wait for the second movie to come out.

    • Yes I love the books so much that I have just re read them all for the third time, finding new things of interest each time. I own the dvd and have watched that four times as well. I love all the description of the silly fashions and shallow attitudes of the people in the capital. I can see shades of that in our everyday lives, as I watch the young people of today and the priorities they display as well as the silly reality tv shows. Very good books for young people to study I think.

      • Janet, I wanted to recommend one of my absolute favorite books to you (in case you want a little variety ;) besides the Hunger Games-which is now one of my fav’s too) But it’s also a really good series, it takes place in the past rather than future. It features a very strong female lead character who you can’t help but fall in love with and admire. It’s a very interesting story line and I’ve read it a few times throughout my life. I have to admit the first 50 pages of the first book are a little boring, but if you make it beyond them you’ll never put the book down! The clan of the cave bear by Jean M Auel. I’m not trying to take away from the Hunger Games at all, very good series…but now that I’ve finished them, I have that minor ‘depression’ of not having a good book to read, lol.

        • Hi thanks I will try those. I have just finished reading The millenium trilogy. which I can recommend . The first one being “The girl with the dragon tatoo” the second one is “The girl who played with fire” and the third is “The girl who kicked the hornets nest” They are a bit violent but very compulsive reading, I couldn’t put them down .

  24. Well thanks, I’ll try those too then :)

    • They are by Stig Larsson by the way .

  25. I have to say, that just finishing the book and just watched the movie (I know, the last person on the planet to see the movie and read the book) – the book was pretty good but the movie lacked a few things. For starters I did not think the acting overall was very good and the movie felt too rush as opposed to the book. Oh well, the movies are never as good as the books they are adapted from.

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