Machete slices its way into theaters today (read Screen Rant‘s review of the film HERE) – meanwhile, the unrated trailer for another Grindhouse-inspired flick, Hobo With a Shotgun, has made its way online.

Hobo With a Shotgun originated as a Canadian fan-made pseudo-trailer that was featured alongside the other fake trailers in the 2007 Robert Rodriguez/Quentin Tarantino Grindhouse double-feature.  The Hobo trailer was not included with U.S. prints of Grindhouse – which itself was considered a financial failure upon its initial release in theaters.

Jason Eisener was responsible for both creating the original Hobo With a Shotgun trailer and co-writing/directing the film adaptation.  The movie revolves around a homeless man (played by Rutger Hauer) who decides to become a vigilante and “clean up” his crime-ridden neighborhood via the use of (what else?) a shotgun.

Two teaser videos for Hobo With a Shotgun were released a couple months back and hinted at the extremely profane and sleazy nature of the film.  The new trailer for the exploitation feature delivers on that promise and features tons of graphic violence and gore – needless to say, it is NSFW.

Check out the NSFW Hobo With a Shotgun trailer below:

Hobo With a Shotgun looks to mimic the stylistic design of old-school exploitation flicks, with its synthesizer score, lewd content, and low-budget look all very much in the vein of actual B-movies from the 1970s and ’80s.  The footage in this preview also contains the kind of brutal violence and gore gags that would have landed the film an X-Rating a few decades ago, but today – in the age of Piranha 3D – should still qualify for the more audience-friendly R-Rating.

Will the success or failure of Machete, Hobo With a Shotgun, and the in-development Thanksgiving movie encourage (or discourage) filmmakers from creating exploitation flicks?  Given the low cost nature of B-movie fare, it seems highly unlikely to disappear in the near future.

Hobo With a Shotgun is tentatively scheduled for release in Spring of 2011.

Source: AICN