The most successful film franchise of all time (not accounting for inflation in ticket prices) draws to a close this summer with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2. Anticipation is sky-high for the final chapter in the fantasy series, which will deliver all the epic wizard warfare and final confrontations that fans have been itching for since Part 1 was released last November.

Producers David Barron and David Heyman atttended Cinema Con last week to promote the final Harry Potter venture and opened up a bit about turning J.K. Rowling’s sprawling text into cinematic art – including some of the changes they implemented in the newest installment.

Cinemablend sat down to chat with the Harry Potter producers, who had the following to say about their general approach to designing the movies:

“By making them [from Harry’s perspective] it created something of a narrative structure, since they’re not organic cinematic narratives, the Harry Potter films. They’re meandering, they go off on these tangents. Inevitably it’s going to be an unconventional structure, but wherever we can impose some sort order on it is important.”

Barron and Heyman also talked about specific changes (or lack thereof) between the second half of the original Deathly Hallows novel and the film – so those who are unfamiliar with the book or prefer not to know as little as possible in advance ought to stop reading after this point.

SPOILERS AHEAD!

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Since Deathly Hallows was split into two movies, it allows for the inclusion of numerous sequences and plot threads that might’ve been otherwise “streamlined” for the movie. Among those that Barron and Heyman say wouldn’t have made the cut, had they made one film, was possibly Harry’s (Daniel Radcliffe) final encounter with Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) in the borderland between life and death, which Harry envisions as looking like King’s Cross – and definitely Harry’s exploration of Snape’s (Alan Rickman) memories after the latter character is killed.

The producers had the following to say on the matter:

“We also wanted to make a bigger scene of Harry’s confrontation with Snape. Snape’s role in the film is minimal, and it was minimal in the second half of the book, and yet you wanted to have the emotional investment when you see his past story [the memory Harry views in the Pensieve]. We wanted to build that up in order for it to have its emotional impact.”

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END OF SPOILERS

The second half of Deathly Hallows promises to be the no-holds-barred epic conclusion that some (basically those who haven’t read the original book) were expecting, but did not get from the more meditative Part 1. With the most awe-inspiring set pieces, F/X-heavy magical battles, and heart-breaking drama yet to be featured in the Harry Potter movies, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 should be an ending to remember.

For more from the Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 producers – including why so many different directors have worked on the movies and why the epilogue was reshot – check out the full interview over at Cinemablend.