Marc Cherry’s upcoming drama pilot, Hallelujah, has cast its primary leads in Donal Logue and Terry O’Quinn, and in doing so, we learn a bit more about the show’s premise.

Hallelujah will focus primarily on the continual conflict between good and evil, and its lasting effect upon the people living in the titular Tennessee town. On one hand will be Logue’s Rye Turner, an exemplary family man and owner of the local diner, who is on a bit of a losing streak, as of late. Turner’s nemesis is Del Roman (O’Quinn), a crooked millionaire who controls everything in Hallelujah, including the law.

Enter the previously cast Jesse L. Martin, as a mysterious stranger (and potential savior) who has put it upon himself to end the bitter conflict between these two men, and return peace to the town.

After the unfortunate cancellation of his critically-lauded FX drama Terriers, it was only a matter of time before Logue turned up in a major role on another series. Having been seen in a handful of beloved, but short-lived programs such as Life, The Knights of Prosperity and of course Terriers, Logue may have finally landed the lead role that will keep him in one spot for more than one season.

Meanwhile, O’Quinn’s name had most recently been associated with the J.J. Abrams-produced Odd Jobs, which would have also featured his Lost co-star Michael Emerson. While that project made it all the way to NBC, it stalled just short of being given a greenlight by the network. However, both actors have landed safely on other shows, with O’Quinn jumping aboard Hallelujah and Emerson joining the Jonathan Nolan-written and J.J. Abrams-produced CBS drama Person of Interest, where he will also portray a man with money and means.

Will Cherry’s ‘Hallelujah’ be a success like ‘Desperate Housewives’?

With the addition of Logue and O’Quinn, the cast of Hallelujah now jumps to five regulars including Frances O’Conner (A.I. Artificial Intelligence) and Arielle Kebbel (True Blood, Vampires Suck). Certainly more stars will be added to the cast, and hopefully we’ll get more nuggets of information about the show’s central themes and plotlines. Hallelujah’s continual reference to the classic literary concept of good vs. evil (with a dash of Yojimbo thrown in for good measure) sounds intriguing enough on paper, but will that translate into another hit show for Desperate Housewives producer Marc Cherry?

Look for Hallelujah to air on ABC in the fall.

Source: Deadline