Hack/Slash is a horror comic book series created by Tim Seeley that centers on Cassie Hack, a surviving horror victim who turns the trope on its head when she dedicates her life to hunting down and killing “slashers” — dead and undead villains who prey on teenage girls. She and her partner in crime, Vlad, work together to take down well known monsters from slasher films — like Chucky — as well as original characters.

With the massive success of The Walking Dead and Fear The Walking Deadit should come as no surprise that Hack/Slash is reportedly the latest comic book property to be adapted for television,  joining the ranks of PreacherWatchmenand Y: The Last Man

THR reports that Relativity Television has secured the rights, and will be working alongside Skip Woods, who will executive produce and write the show. Woods seems like an apt choice for this horror/action show, as he is best known for both Hitman films, The A-Team, and A Good Day To Die Hard. Adrian Askarieh — who optioned the material back in 2005 — will serve as another executive producer.

Various adaptations have long been rumored for this particular comic book. In 2006, Seeley attended the San Diego Comic Convention alongside director Todd Lincoln to discuss a live-action film Rogue had planned on releasing in 2008, which never materialized. Not limited to just the big and small screen, it has also been adapted into the stage play titled “Hack/Slash: Stage Fright”.

Hack Slash Cassie and Vlad surrounded by bodies 570x856 Hack/Slash Horror Comic Becoming A TV Series


Much like the upcoming Jack Ryan series, and the latest news that Hansel & Gretel is being modified for television, this is just one in a series of adaptions that have transitioned from major film projects into television events. While the productions have been creatively exciting — and advantageous for shared universe crossovers — it also serves to reduce options for the big screen. These days grand “event” movies are dominating in theaters, pushing out smaller films with less of a built-in fanbase.

Now, there is increasingly less room for traditional film adaptations and these smaller projects are moving from movies to television. This shift is drastically altering our television landscape, creating the phenomenon of “too much TV,” while simultaneously keeping us in the Golden Age of television. Perhaps we will eventually see the pendulum swing the other direction, as movie goers max out on large-scale blockbusters, but it will likely take many years until executives take note and modify their production schedules. In the meantime, at least we have plenty of theater at home.

Screen Rant will bring you more information on the Hack/Slash TV series as it is made available.

Source: THR