‘Game of Thrones’ Season 3, Episode 7 Review – The Far Side of the World

Published 1 year ago by

Mackenzie Crook in Game of Thrones The Bear and the Maiden Fair Game of Thrones Season 3, Episode 7 Review – The Far Side of the World

Far more than any other show on television, Game of Thrones uses what few hours it has each season to arrange characters and set events into motion that will become important somewhere down the line. And considering the vast majority of the storytelling comes from small actions and discussions of said events, the series has learned to make the most of this format and frequently comes away with entertaining bits of set-up like ‘The Bear and the Maiden Fair’

By and large, the episode is a late-season de-cluttering, a shifting of the pieces to get them into the right position as the story winds its way toward the events that will likely shape and define season 3 far more than the various storylines, maimings and maneuverings have thus far.

It’s another busy episode, but there’s enough going on in most of the narratives that the audience has a better grasp of what’s at stake for each character – though Theon’s continued torment at the hands of his unnamed assailant is feeling rather tedious – to ensure the shuffling of plots can comfortably cruise along on the goodwill and momentum of the three superlative episodes which recently aired. (This is in contrast to earlier in the season when the reorganization of plots lumbered somewhat, as they collectively tried to pick up speed.)

And so, after the excitement that came from Dany’s sacking of Astapor and the visual and symbolic treat that was the triumphant scaling of the Wall by Jon Snow and Ygritte (along with the others that didn’t perish on the way up), ‘The Bear and the Maiden Fair’ slows things down a bit to more closely examine the idea of relationships and what, if anything, each individual manages to get from them.

Alfie Allen in Game of Thrones The Bear and the Maiden Fair Game of Thrones Season 3, Episode 7 Review – The Far Side of the World

Early on, Jon Snow’s still a bit perturbed about Orell’s selfish act of cutting the rope that held him and Ygritte in order to save his own life. Orell makes it clear to Snow that, in his experience, people act with their own best interests at heart, and sacrifice and loyalty only come into play when it “suits them.”

Orell’s line of thinking is reminiscent of Littlefinger’s, who is willing to throw the whole realm into chaos if it means he can move up in the Westeros power rankings. It’s a nihilistic approach that works for men like Orell and Littlefinger, as they seem motivated entirely by thoughts of possession (i.e., power over a certain red-headed Wildling). But it goes against the view of men like Jon Snow and, surprisingly, Jaime Lannister, who are – in this case, anyway – more compelled by loyalty (to a concept or to an individual) than they are by the acquisition of a thing.

But Jon’s bound between two vows (the one he gave to the Night’s Watch and the one he pledged to Ygritte) and soon, he’ll likely be asked to choose one or the other. Meanwhile, Jaime winds up returning to Harrenhal to rescue Brienne (from a bear, mind you), even though she’s released him from his debt to her.

The notion of loyalty (and especially vows) carries over to all corners of the realm as Cat Stark seems to be the only one amongst her son’s entourage fearful of angering the “prickly” Walder Frey more than he already is over Robb’s dishonorable shirking of his vow, while at King’s Landing, Tyrion and Sansa wrestle with the notion of their pending nuptials. In Tyrion’s case, Shae wants him to cut and run, but he claims loyalty to his family has bound him to this fate – especially since Tyrion’s options outside the Lannister name and wealth are woefully few.

Gwendoline Christie in Game of Thrones The Bear and the Maiden Fair Game of Thrones Season 3, Episode 7 Review – The Far Side of the World

Clearly, loyalties are a fluid thing and may be given up at the first sign of a resurrected man. Look at how quickly the Brotherhood Without Banners sent Gendry off with Melisandre – and after all that talk about not being obliged to anyone, too.

Perhaps most striking is how Daenerys has managed to rise to such a powerful position in (what probably just feels like) a relatively short amount of time, and how much of that is due to the loyalty she’s been granted by Ser Jorah, Barristan Selmy, the few Dothraki still in her party and now the legion of Unsullied at her command. She may be on the far side of the world, but at the rate she’s going, Dany will be a threat to King’s Landing long before Tywin decides she’s worth taking seriously.

All in all, major shifts seem to be looming and ‘The Bear and the Maiden Fair’ does an admirable job of setting them in motion.

———

Game of Thrones continues next Sunday with ‘Second Sons’ @9pm on HBO. Check out a preview below:

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  1. This show is THE BEST ON CABLE. PERIOD.

    • This show is THE BEST ON TELEVISION. PERIOD.

      Fixed.

    • It’s definitely my favorite show on TV atm.

  2. Fantastic episode, Daenerys is as intimidating than ever before, and I couldn’t bear to watch Jamie fight for Brienne.

    • Pun intended? Ha

  3. Can’t believe only 3 episodes left… it feels the season just started! Ugh, the wait between seasons is brutal!

    • The wait between books is even more brutal. :)

      • True that.

        B

        • yea, wasn’t it like 10 years now since the last book? lol

          • Seems like it. I think George is only about 1/4 done with Winds of Winter, so it’s going to be a while. :(

            B

          • Book 5 came out the summer after season 1 debuted, actually. So it’ll be two years since then. Give GRRM some credit there ;)

            He also recognizes that the show is depending on him to finish the last two books.

            Right now I am really liking how they split up Book 3 into two seasons anyway and wouldn’t mind if they did it again. I think GRRM will be okay.

            I am hoping Book 6 will come out in 2015 at least. That should give the show plenty of breathing space. There seems to be enough support for it to go on another six years anyway.

  4. No mention of the music at the end, or the fact that the episode spent a lot of time examining the passion between several relationships, all in very eerie foreshadowing of what is to come.

    George wrote this episode himself, and he managed to throw in a lot of bits we never really get to see, like Tywin and Joffrey’s little back and forth about Daenerys.

    Countdown, 2 weeks. It’s going to scare the crap out of the people who don’t know the books.

    The instrumental version of the Rains of Castamere was awesome.

    Keep that tune in your head, everybody :evil grin:

    B

    • May be the best track so far:

      • Oh yeah, killer stuff. It’s easily among the 3 best things Ramin has written for the series.

        I haven’t heard anything about Season 3′s soundtrack yet, the news seems to be late. For the last 2 years, I had heard by now, for the June release dates, but as of the last time I checked on this years, nothing announced yet.

        I’ll give a major mention to Dany’s reworked theme, as well. Killer stuff. Some cool stuff this year, though not a ton of stuff he hadn’t already written, mainly reworks. All great though.

        B

  5. I would have loved the review to touch on Robb & Talisa. For some reason I don’t trust her. She seems to good to be true. I haven’t read the books and I’m meaning to soon so it will be interesting to see how she develops.

    • Oh there is a conspiracy theory that she is really a spy. As she bears 0 resemblance to her counterpart from the novel, there is really no way to know for sure yet. I doubt it, I think everything about her is simply diabolus ex machina in foreshadowing, and not because SHE does anything. This episode, George hits you personally with passion in relationships, all to get the viewer unprepared for what is to come.

      Countdown, 2 weeks.

      B

      • 3 weeks actually. Game of Thrones is on a break after next episode, but i know exactly what you are talking about.

        • Aww, I wasn’t aware that they were preempting what will be the season’s best episode for Soderberghs Liberace piece. Ugh. :(

          B

      • Not really. Tallisa and her counterpart is practically the same but Tallisa is given more time for her character to develop.

        • Actually, the GoT Talisa, if I remember correctly, said comes from Volantis (as she wrote to her mother in that tongue), but the one from ASOIAF is native of Westeros (I won’t spoil anything here folks). So there’s no telling what exactly the GoT Talisa is.

        • How are they practically the same? Besides the fact that they both seem to be from minor noble families, there is 0 resemblance. Talisa is a healer who amputates wounded people lol, and talks back to nobles. She also just said she was pregnant, which Jeyne specifically never was. The two characters come from completely different continents, and George Martin himself suggested to the writers that since she lacked any resemblance to Jeyne, they just create a new character, and he named her himself.

          Rob also marries Talisa for completely different reasons than he married Jeyne in the book.

          B

    • For some reason I also don’t trust her. And writing that letter in Valyrian only made that feeling stronger..

      • Well, she’s from Volantis, so there is that.

        B

      • I thought the same thing to at that scene. She could be sending secrets about the war in her language but there’s no sign of it at all.

  6. I hope Jaime becomes a one handed swordsman and kick that guy ass that chop off his hand. Poor Theon, enough with the torture already. I thought it was his father that had him torture for disobeying him but not even a father would castrate his own son. Then my second guess would be Rob but even he doesn’t know where Theon is. Maybe the torturer is a ramdom person, a family member of someone Theon killed during the raid and wants revenge? He’s gotta be crazy to do all that for nothing.

    • SPOILER ALERT!!!!

      Here i s your answer: Theon has been tortured repeatedly by Ramsay Bolton. Ramsay removes the skin on several of Theon’s toes and fingers, leaving him in agony for days before removing the joints but only after Theon begs him to remove them. He broke and removed several of Theon’s teeth because Ramsay hated his smiles. It is also implied, but not confirmed, that Ramsay removes Theon’s genitals as well. Theon is forced to take on the guise of Reek, Ramsay’s former serving man. Theon is forbidden to bathe and is caked from head to toe in filth and excrement.

      • They are being light on the flaying though so far. Theon begged for his finger to be taken off right away, as opposed to Ramsay letting the skin crack and fester! lol

        Anyway, he’s not a Bolton yet, so we’ll still call him a Snow.

        Also, they are iffy about spoilers on here, so I’d be surprised if your comment didn’t get removed.

        Reek, Reek, it rhymes with sneak.

        B

        • @ Bri,

          This MutantX guy doesn’t care about spoiler warnings. He has been doing this, in the comment section, for every week of GoT. It’s like he get some personal pleasure by ruining all the fun for people who haven’t read the book. Last week he decided to give a list of everyone who is still living at the end of book 5 (although he was wrong on two people) with no spoiler warning. A couple weeks ago he gave away the entire scene that everyone who has read the book has been looking forward to all season long, with no spoiler warning. Take a look at his comment below, he gave away the whole story of a character for the next three books. I wouldn’t be surprised if he didn’t put Spoiler Warning at the beginning of his comment, but that the moderators have caught his comment, prior it posting, and placed the spoiler warning in themselves. I feel bad for people who haven’t read the books and had things ruined because of this guy.

          • Aye, I noticed the one below this after I typed it. I love to discuss the differences between the series and the novels, but only up to what they have shown so far on the series. What this guy is doing isn’t cool.

            B

            • Yeah, he isn’t even discussing the show he is just saying what is going to happen to spoil it for everyone else.

      • Oh, one more thing, the gelding isn’t implied on the show at all. It was last week.

        Yes, in the book, it was implied, in the series it’s obvious. It was the whole point of the Theon scenes in this ep.

        B

    • Oh, he is quite crazy…Theon has a long way to go with this bastard..literally…

      • There is a pretty good clue as to where he is that has been shown more than once, if you’ve looked closely.

    • SPOILER ALERT WARNING

      More about Theons future: Before he endures the worst of Ramsay’s tortures, Theon once escapes with the help of Kyra (his former bedwarmer at Winterfell). It turns out, though, that they are allowed to escape by Ramsay. Ramsay lets them get a day’s head start before hunting them with his hounds. Theon is taken back to the Dreadfort dungeon and Kyra meets a cruel and grisly death at the hands of Ramsay and his hounds. Theon is mentally and physically broken by Ramsay and lives in great fear of him. [19]

      After Ramsay’s father announces his return to the North, Ramsay has Theon washed and properly clothed, and sends him to deliver peace terms to the Ironborn occupying Moat Cailin, promising them food and safe passage if they surrender. When they do surrender, Ramsay has them all flayed alive and displays their skinless bodies along the road to the Moat. Theon is present when Ramsay is introduced to his bride “Arya Stark” who Theon instantly recognizes as Jeyne Poole.[20]

      Because Theon was a ward of Winterfell for ten years and is the closest thing to kin “Arya” has, he gives the bride away at the wedding. Jeyne pleads with Theon several times before the wedding to help rescue her. Theon refuses.

      During the wedding banquet being held in the hall Theon makes his way toward the front, someone calls him Theon Turncloak, men turn away at the sight of him, one spits. Theon thinks to himself that even the bastards of camp followers mock him. Theon doesn’t care, he thinks,
      “ “Let them laugh. His pride had perished here at Winterfell; there was no place for such in the dungeons of the Dreadfort. When you have known the kiss of a flaying knife, a laugh looses all its power to hurt you”. [21] ”

      During the bedding Ramsay has Theon strip his bride for him and makes Theon watch as he humiliates and degrades her. [21] Theon silently hopes that when Stannis comes he will kill Ramsay Bolton.

      When several Bolton men are murdered at Winterfell, Theon is thought a suspect. The idea is quickly dismissed by Roose Bolton, who claims that Theon is too broken and weak to have carried out the murders. The murders cause tension in the castle between the Freys, Boltons, Manderlys and other Northern houses.[22]

      The musician at Winterfell “Abel” and six wilding spearwives disguised as maids are actually responsible for some of the deaths and use the confusion in the castle to free “Arya Stark,” enlisting the help of a very reluctant Theon. In the end, Theon and Jeyne manage to escape and are caught by Mors Umber who sends them to rendezvous with Stannis’s army a few days ride away.[22]

      Asha is a captive with Stannis’s army and barely recognizes Theon due to his torture at the hands of Ramsay.[23]
      The Winds of Winter

      Theon is now a prisoner of Stannis Baratheon, who plans to have Theon executed, but not right away, Stannis tells one of his knights that the Turncloak “Is more use to me alive. He has knowledge we may need.” [24]
      Quotes
      “ “The boar can keep his tusks, and the bear his claws. There’s nothing half so mortal as a grey goose feather.” [25] ”

      “ “I’m not him, I’m not the turncloak, he died at Winterfell. My name is Reek, It rhymes with freak”[26] ”
      Theon to Barbrey Ryswell while in the persona of “Reek”.
      Family
      Unknown of
      House Stonetree

      Quellon

      Unknown of
      House Sunderly

      Unknown of
      House Piper

      Before he endures the worst of Ramsay’s tortures, Theon once escapes with the help of Kyra (his former bedwarmer at Winterfell). It turns out, though, that they are allowed to escape by Ramsay. Ramsay lets them get a day’s head start before hunting them with his hounds. Theon is taken back to the Dreadfort dungeon and Kyra meets a cruel and grisly death at the hands of Ramsay and his hounds. Theon is mentally and physically broken by Ramsay and lives in great fear of him. [19]

      After Ramsay’s father announces his return to the North, Ramsay has Theon washed and properly clothed, and sends him to deliver peace terms to the Ironborn occupying Moat Cailin, promising them food and safe passage if they surrender. When they do surrender, Ramsay has them all flayed alive and displays their skinless bodies along the road to the Moat. Theon is present when Ramsay is introduced to his bride “Arya Stark” who Theon instantly recognizes as Jeyne Poole.[20]

      Because Theon was a ward of Winterfell for ten years and is the closest thing to kin “Arya” has, he gives the bride away at the wedding. Jeyne pleads with Theon several times before the wedding to help rescue her. Theon refuses.

      During the wedding banquet being held in the hall Theon makes his way toward the front, someone calls him Theon Turncloak, men turn away at the sight of him, one spits. Theon thinks to himself that even the bastards of camp followers mock him. Theon doesn’t care, he thinks,
      “ “Let them laugh. His pride had perished here at Winterfell; there was no place for such in the dungeons of the Dreadfort. When you have known the kiss of a flaying knife, a laugh looses all its power to hurt you”. [21] ”

      During the bedding Ramsay has Theon strip his bride for him and makes Theon watch as he humiliates and degrades her. [21] Theon silently hopes that when Stannis comes he will kill Ramsay Bolton.

      When several Bolton men are murdered at Winterfell, Theon is thought a suspect. The idea is quickly dismissed by Roose Bolton, who claims that Theon is too broken and weak to have carried out the murders. The murders cause tension in the castle between the Freys, Boltons, Manderlys and other Northern houses.[22]

      The musician at Winterfell “Abel” and six wilding spearwives disguised as maids are actually responsible for some of the deaths and use the confusion in the castle to free “Arya Stark,” enlisting the help of a very reluctant Theon. In the end, Theon and Jeyne manage to escape and are caught by Mors Umber who sends them to rendezvous with Stannis’s army a few days ride away.[22]

      Asha is a captive with Stannis’s army and barely recognizes Theon due to his torture at the hands of Ramsay.[23]
      The Winds of Winter

      Theon is now a prisoner of Stannis Baratheon, who plans to have Theon executed, but not right away, Stannis tells one of his knights that the Turncloak “Is more use to me alive. He has knowledge we may need.” [24]
      Quotes
      “ “The boar can keep his tusks, and the bear his claws. There’s nothing half so mortal as a grey goose feather.” [25] ”

      “ “I’m not him, I’m not the turncloak, he died at Winterfell. My name is Reek, It rhymes with freak”[26] ”
      Theon to Barbrey Ryswell while in the persona of “Reek”.
      Family
      Unknown of
      House Stonetree

      Quellon

      Unknown of
      House Sunderly

      Before he endures the worst of Ramsay’s tortures, Theon once escapes with the help of Kyra (his former bedwarmer at Winterfell). It turns out, though, that they are allowed to escape by Ramsay. Ramsay lets them get a day’s head start before hunting them with his hounds. Theon is taken back to the Dreadfort dungeon and Kyra meets a cruel and grisly death at the hands of Ramsay and his hounds. Theon is mentally and physically broken by Ramsay and lives in great fear of him. [19]

      After Ramsay’s father announces his return to the North, Ramsay has Theon washed and properly clothed, and sends him to deliver peace terms to the Ironborn occupying Moat Cailin, promising them food and safe passage if they surrender. When they do surrender, Ramsay has them all flayed alive and displays their skinless bodies along the road to the Moat. Theon is present when Ramsay is introduced to his bride “Arya Stark” who Theon instantly recognizes as Jeyne Poole.[20]

      Because Theon was a ward of Winterfell for ten years and is the closest thing to kin “Arya” has, he gives the bride away at the wedding. Jeyne pleads with Theon several times before the wedding to help rescue her. Theon refuses.

      During the wedding banquet being held in the hall Theon makes his way toward the front, someone calls him Theon Turncloak, men turn away at the sight of him, one spits. Theon thinks to himself that even the bastards of camp followers mock him. Theon doesn’t care, he thinks,
      “ “Let them laugh. His pride had perished here at Winterfell; there was no place for such in the dungeons of the Dreadfort. When you have known the kiss of a flaying knife, a laugh looses all its power to hurt you”. [21] ”

      During the bedding Ramsay has Theon strip his bride for him and makes Theon watch as he humiliates and degrades her. [21] Theon silently hopes that when Stannis comes he will kill Ramsay Bolton.

      When several Bolton men are murdered at Winterfell, Theon is thought a suspect. The idea is quickly dismissed by Roose Bolton, who claims that Theon is too broken and weak to have carried out the murders. The murders cause tension in the castle between the Freys, Boltons, Manderlys and other Northern houses.[22]

      The musician at Winterfell “Abel” and six wilding spearwives disguised as maids are actually responsible for some of the deaths and use the confusion in the castle to free “Arya Stark,” enlisting the help of a very reluctant Theon. In the end, Theon and Jeyne manage to escape and are caught by Mors Umber who sends them to rendezvous with Stannis’s army a few days ride away.[22]

      Asha is a captive with Stannis’s army and barely recognizes Theon due to his torture at the hands of Ramsay.[23]
      The Winds of Winter

      Theon is now a prisoner of Stannis Baratheon, who plans to have Theon executed, but not right away, Stannis tells one of his knights that the Turncloak “Is more use to me alive. He has knowledge we may need.” [24]
      Quotes
      “ “The boar can keep his tusks, and the bear his claws. There’s nothing half so mortal as a grey goose feather.” [25] ”

      “ “I’m not him, I’m not the turncloak, he died at Winterfell. My name is Reek, It rhymes with freak”[26] ”
      Theon to Barbrey Ryswell while in the persona of “Reek”.
      Family
      Unknown of
      House Stonetree

      Quellon

      Unknown of
      House Sunderly

      Unknown of
      House Piper

      • This should be removed. I was replying to your earlier comments, but you are giving way too much away now.

        Some of it is also irrelevant to the series, as they obviously didn’t even use Kyra. They replaced it with Ramsay’s first appearance.

        Overall, this version of Ramsay is nothing compared to how evil he is in the book, it’s just the surface. The tv show will never get into some of the stuff he REALLY does.

        B

  7. People tend to miss the little things. Like a giant torture cross on a banner shown over and over.

    • As non-book readers, its much harder to spot these sutble clues.. And even if you spot them, it’s not easy to make the connection between the banners and Theon. But I rewatched all episodes recently. And there have been more hidden clues (Roose saying he will send his bastard to re-take Winterfel)

    • Yep. If you’re really paying attention, “The Climb” has a torture scene with Theon that transitions DIRECTLY into another scene with a very CLEAR clue as to the tormentor’s identity.

      Season 2 also tells you what’s going on if you pay attention to the scenes with Robb and his camp.

      • But because 2 scenes transition, doesn’t always mean they are connected. I think most viewers, who didn’t read the books or haven’t been spoiled, still don’t have a clue who the torturer is.

        • I haven’t read the books (yet) but I think I know who it is. But the fact Robb is clueless to Theon’s whereabouts is the part that confuses me if I think who it is.

        • I could be wrong, but I think the clue is in one of the banner’s.

  8. I love the show, but I’m also somewhat hoping that the Theon torture scenes don’t continue anymore after this episode. There’s enough characters to go around and I think none of us will forget what’s happening to Theon now even if he disappears for a few episodes.

  9. Jamie has some Honor left in him yet, i’m starting to like his character, hope he gets a chance to redeem himself.

    • Hasn’t he been redeeming himself all season long? He saved everyone in Kings Landing, he saved Brienne from being raped (and lost a hand doing so), he saved Brienne again from Bolton’s men..

  10. The biggest dissapointment was the end when it was announced there were only three episodes left……I’m sure these aren’t cheap, but damn. It seems like they’ve barely hit full stride when the season is suddenly coming to an end every time.

    I’ve been listening to the books while driving semiand haven’t quite caught up to this point yet. But I’m glad I have because there’s a lot of things that I wasn’t all that sure of in regards to how everyone related to each other in the stories.

  11. I have a question for those who read the books (I’m only on the second) Do they ever explain how these extended “Summers” and “Winter” actually work? I mean they keep talking about ten years of summer and are expecting an even longer period of winter. There has to be a catch because a lot of people (And animals) would starve to death with ten years of no crops. My guess is that they still have fours seasons, but the winters are longer or the summers are longer depending what time they consider they’re going through….On whatever planet this is supposed to be…..Can’t be Earth because no time lines in human history match anything here.

    • It’s never explained in the book. I assume that they have adjusted for the winters and know to save up a huge amount of their crops. It would be interesting if they showed massive storehouses in the series. I’m not sure if Dorne and the lands in the South really get winters. Perhaps the North imports massive amounts of food? Whatever they normally do has been interrupted by the war. This winter will be incredibly cruel.

      • Yes, there are 4 seasons, but the Summers and Winters are extended and irregular. Other than that, it is not explained. It may have something to do with R’hllor (the lord of light) and the Other (he who shall not be named). My theory about those 2 gods is that the entire idea is totally misinterpreted though. I don’t trust R’hllor at ALL.

        B

    • Nope — It’s never explained, and this is one of the many problems I have with the GOT novels. If a world had very long [years long] ‘seasons’ of indeterminate length, it would affect everything in their culture…and yet somehow on the GOT world, or Westeros anyway, they are stuck in the high Medieval period. This makes no sense at all. My personal belief is that GRRM is simply making this stuff up as he goes along. If in fact he does have some over-arching storyline and worldview, he’s concealing it _very_ well.

      • Someone else had an interesting theory about them staying in this Midevil period. That these little ice age periods kept them from from much advancement because it forced them to basically devote all their energies to just staying alive. Then again they talk of war histories that go back a few thousand years so that too seems a bit of a stretch.

        I’d like to say also that I used to wonder why they didn’t try to limit the story lines in the movie version so they could concentrate better on a few for the short time they have to tell the story. After listening to the books while going down the road I’m surprised they’ve been able to cover as much as they have. These books are a massive undertaking because there’s just so many different things going on at the same time. Sure can chew up a lot of highway with this series…

  12. first of all im not a dude second i did place a spoiler alert, if you git all boo booed then dont read it .

    • You put a spoiler alert in for the first time in 7 weeks. Don’t act like you’re some kind of saint when you haven’t done it before. Screen Rant has had to delete most of your post in the previous weeks because you don’t follow the guidelines.

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