Before we get to see what Dirty Dancing looks like in the 21st century, we’ll be treated to a modernized take on another dance-happy 1980s classic, Footloose – as filtered through the mind of co-writer and director Craig Brewer (Hustle & Flow, Black Snake Moan).

Brewer’s plan has been to rework the famous fish-out-of-water tale as more of a gritty and hip modern-day yarn about a city boy butting heads with the authorities in a small southern town. Based on the second trailer for his Footloose remake, has Brewer delivered just that?

Well, he’s certainly got the “grittier” part down, adding more contemporary and “racy” clothing, music, and dancing to the mix – not to mention, more down n’ dirty street brawls and an explosive race between two graffiti-plastered buses (as opposed to the tractor race, in the original Footloose).

Here is an official synopsis for the Footloose remake:

Ren MacCormack (played by newcomer Kenny Wormald) is transplanted from Boston to the small southern town of Bomont where he experiences a heavy dose of culture shock. A few years prior, the community was rocked by a tragic accident that killed five teenagers after a night out and Bomont’s local councilmen and the beloved Reverend Shaw Moore (Dennis Quaid) responded by implementing ordinances that prohibit loud music and dancing. Not one to bow to the status quo, Ren challenges the ban, revitalizing the town and falling in love with the minister’s troubled daughter Ariel (Julianne Hough) in the process.

Original Footloose screenwriter Dean Pitchford collaborated with Brewer on the screenplay for the remake – hence the overt similarities, in terms of narrative. So, what does a modern-day spin on this story look like?

Find out by watching the latest Footloose trailer (via Yahoo! Movies) below:

It’s hard to say if Wormald and Hough will make for appealing leads in the Footloose remake, since neither one has ever headlined a picture before. Both are able to pull off the dance moves well enough and are clearly meant to be the more ordinary characters in a world populated by colorful types, like Quaid’s conservative reverend or the stereotypical Southerners that populate the local high school. Arugably, the slightly hokey feel of it all is meant to be part of the charm.

Of course, if you felt the conflict at the heart of the 1984 film – namely, dancing being outlawed in a small town – stretched credibility, then you’ll probably have all the more trouble with that scenario taking place in 2011. Brewer and Pitchford have wisely retained the ultra-small town setting of the original Footloose, so that should help the culture clash in the film play out all the more believably.

While the new Footloose will certainly look and feel “edgier” than its predecessor, will it also inspire the sort of devotion from a new generation of moviegoers – like the original film did? Well, we’ll just have to wait and see, but color us skeptical for now.

On that note – check out the new Footloose poster below:

Footloose arrives in theaters on October 14th, 2011.

Source: Yahoo! Movies