‘The Flash’ Adds Tony Woodward AKA Girder as Recurring Villain

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Girder joins The Flash The Flash Adds Tony Woodward AKA Girder as Recurring Villain

The CW’s Arrow spin-off The Flash is gearing up to hit TV screens this fall after the premiere of the pilot episode at San Diego Comic-Con 2014, and recent weeks have seen the show’s cast of recurring characters starting to fill out with several familiar names from DC comics. Since the pilot established that Barry Allen was far from the only person affected by the particle accelerator disaster at S.T.A.R. Labs, quite a few of these upcoming characters have superpowers of their own.

Wentworth Miller is set to play villain Captain Cold, while on the other end of the thermometer Arrow star Stephen Amell’s cousin Robbie Amell will play Firestorm. Kelly Frye will appear in the first season as Bette Sans Souci AKA Plastique, and Arrow regular Emily Beckett Richards (who plays Felicity Smoak) is also set to make a guest appearance.

It’s lucky that Barry Allen has so much energy, because he’s going to need it with the number of superpowered villains now set to appear. TV Line reports that episode 6 of The Flash season 1 will introduce Tony Woodward AKA Girder, according to a casting call that reveals the character is an old schoolmate of Barry’s who used to bully him when they were kids.

The Flash Starring Grant Gustin Time Slot The Flash Adds Tony Woodward AKA Girder as Recurring Villain

In the comics Woodward is a steel worker who gets dunked into a vat of molten steel, which had been treated with products of S.T.A.R. Labs’ experiments. His body is transformed into a jumbled mass of metal, and the casting call describes Girder as “a grinning lunkhead who loves destruction [and an] unstoppable force… who can transmute any part of his body into solid steel.” Based on this description, it sounds like the TV version of Woodward will look normal most of the time and will be able to transform into Girder selectively.

The main antagonist of The Flash pilot, who was based on DC villain Weather Wizard, was arguably the weakest part of the episode, but a roster of strong and interesting villains could be exactly what is needed to get the series off to a running start. Girder hasn’t yet been cast, but with The Flash premiering on The CW in just a couple more months, we can expect to have a face to put to the name fairly soon.

Already The Flash has clearly demonstrated a much more fantastical tone compared to the relatively grounded Arrow, and introducing a different supervillain in each episode could be a great formula for the first season. Hopefully we’ll get to see even more members of the Rogues Gallery in the first season, or even see unsmiling S.T.A.R. Labs scientist Caitlin Snow transform into her superpowered alter-ego, Killer Frost.

The Flash premieres Tuesday, October 7th, 2014 @8pm on The CW.

Source: TV Line

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  1. i wanna know the voice actor who will be doing Gorilla Grodd

    • I could see John Noble do it. He already did Brainiac, but his voice would be good for Grodd I think.

  2. But who’s going to play The Trickster?

    • The question is…. Who’s going to play Mirror Master?

      • Mirror master is so underrated. Love that weirdo lol

        • Yeah. Very interested to see the concept of mirror world in the show.

      • Damn Mirror-Master could bring Inception-levels of weirdness to the show! Vintage Silver Age Flash!

  3. Even though I have every confidence that this show will be much better quality, it is starting to sound depressingly more and more like “Smallville 2.0″.

    • Which is a weird thing because Smallville almost tried to shoehorn characters in to keep interest but this is like “Hey, lets expand our universe”.

      Then again, 42 minutes of The Flash pilot was much better than the entire 10 seasons of Smallville I put myself through. Genuinely didn’t like that show. First 6 seasons were horrible, cliched and forced teen drama storylines (I hated those kinds of shows, could never get into Buffy, Angel, Beverly Hills 90210, The OC, Dawson’s Creek or Party Of Five, even though friends loved them all) and from season 7 onwards, it felt to me like “Crap, err….lets put this character in and hope for the best”. Kristin Kreuk was kinda hot but that was my sole reason for watching and by the time she left, I forced myself through to see how they would possibly end the show.

      The final shot of the show was cool though, I’ll give them that.

      • I liked the “Flash” pilot and I still have high hopes for the show. Its just things like Girder being an old high school bully of Barry that has me worried. That is such an unnecessary, stupid, and clichéd plot point that it screams “Smallville” level of corny. Also, the whole Starlabs explosion causing all the villains is uncomfortably similar to the meteor rocks causing all the villains in ” Smallville “.

  4. This show will be awesome. This will most likely make everyone forget about Smallville. Arrow’s already doing a good job of that.

  5. We tend to forget that Smallville came around 2001 — even before the first Spider-Man movie. A lot of the superhero film conventions we are accustomed to today were not available to the show-runners back then. I still believe they did a tremendous job at humanising characters like Clark Kent (compared to Superman Returns or even MoS), Jonathan Kent, and Lex and Lionel Luthors. Yes it gave us a restrained Superman adaptation, but the character-arcs and dynamics explored in the show were, and still are, very memorable.

    Having said that, I have a lot of hope for Arrow S3 and the first season of the Flash. It takes these type of comparatively-low-budgeted superhero shows at least a season to get a general audience approve of it. The Flash, if it pushes along the edges of sci-fi and maybe add in a lesson or two from the Captain America movies, could flourish as the best and most truthful superhero series (on both film and TV) out there right now. Honestly, if DC wants to “compete” with Marvel at the same sort of tone that Marvel has used for its movies, the best character to do that with is the Flash.