Tom Cruise is usually a pro at chewing bubblegum and kicking butt in his movies, but in the upcoming Edge of Tomorrow his character – Lt. Col. Bill Cage – is more experienced at drumming up support for the army – putting his good looks and charisma to use – than actual fighting. That changes when Cage is punished for insubordination by being deployed in the field, as part of the human resistance against an extraterrestrial army that’s invaded Earth.

Edge of Tomorrow was directed by Doug Liman (Bourne Identity, Mr. and Mrs. Smith), who drew from a screenplay co-written by Christopher McQuarrie (Jack Reacher) and Jez and John-Henry Butterworth (Fair Game), based on the novel All You Need Is Kill by Japanese author Hiroshi Sakurazaka. Cruise spends most of the film sharing the screen with Emily Blunt (Looper), though such familiar faces as Bill Paxton (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.) and Jeremy Piven (Entourage) also show up to play key supporting roles.

The first trailer for Edge of Tomorrow focuses primarily on establishing the film’s Groundhog Day/Source Code-esque sci-fi premise – Cage gets stuck in a time loop that allows him to relive (and die) on the same day over and over – while the newly-unveiled second preview examines what happens once Cage joins forces with fellow soldier Rita Vrataski (Blunt) – someone who’s also “hijacked” the aliens’  power and been equipped with an infinite number of lives to lose in battle.

Cruise as Cage is apparently shown dying a lot in Edge of Tomorrow; as illustrated by the second trailer, that sets the stage for some dark comedy, as well as some poignance – with regard to what the future holds, should Cage and Vrataski ever manage to break the cycle, defeat the baddie aliens, and live to tell the tale. Fortunately, it seems that the most enticing aspects of the film (in terms of action and story) are being saved for the actual movie, rather than spoiled ahead of time.

All thing considered, the only significant concern at this point seems to be that Edge of Tomorrow might not have that much depth, as far as thematic/philosophical implications of its premise being examined goes. The futuristic world and battle sequences (featuring soldiers armed with mechanical exoskeletons) seem well-done; so long as McQuarrie and Liman have also given the film just enough brains, then we should be good to go.

Edge of Tomorrow opens in U.S. theaters on June 6th, 2014.